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Japan to begin collecting ¥1,000 departure tax from next Monday


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https://www.japantimes.co.jp/news/2019/01/01/national/japan-begin-collecting-1000-departure-tax-next-monday/#.XCvot9IzavF

Japan to begin collecting ¥1,000 departure tax from next Monday

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Japan will start collecting from next Monday a departure tax of ¥1,000 for each person leaving the country by aircraft or ship regardless of nationality.

Under the relevant law enacted last April, the levy will be collected each time an individual leaves the country, and comes on top of airfare, ship fare and travel fees.

The government plans to utilize the revenue from the tax for measures to accommodate more foreign visitors to the country, develop tourism bases and improve immigration procedures, officials said.

People leaving Japan within 24 hours of their transit entry and children under 2 years old will be exempted from the departure tax.

Those with tickets purchased and issued before Monday will be basically exempted from the tax.

The revenue from the tax is estimated to hit ¥6 billion in fiscal 2018 through March 2019 and ¥50 billion in fiscal 2019.

Specifically, the revenue will be used to set up facial recognition gates at airports for speedier immigration procedures, while also promoting the use of multilingual information boards and helping introduce more cashless payment terminals for public transportation.

The number of visitors to Japan has surged in recent years, topping 30 million for the first time ever in 2018.

The government has set a goal of increasing the annual number of foreign visitors to 40 million by 2020, when the Tokyo Olympics and Paralympics will take place.

With the departure tax, the government expects to secure stable financial resources for measures to promote tourism, the offcials said. 

 

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Looks like the Rugby world cup ticket holders may get an exemption if their block bookings have already been made.

Should assist with their tourism  upgrade as a reduction in tourism numbers may mean less expenses on future upgrades

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Salty Dog

I don't think I would cancel my trip there just because they enacted a $9 fee… 

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Me neither

 

But, if I was starting out. I might just decide any place that wants to tax me for boosting their tourism industry may get second place to one that does not.

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smokey

Cheap compared to philippines always over 100 for me to leave us should.do that to all visitors

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smokey are you a visitor? or a longer term stayer on residential avoidance?

 

As opposed to a genuine tourist who visits and leaves on their journey

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Headshot
13 minutes ago, MickyG said:

smokey are you a visitor? or a longer term stayer on residential avoidance?

As opposed to a genuine tourist who visits and leaves on their journey

What difference does it make? Do you think that if Smokey answers one way or another, it somehow makes his opinion more or less relevant when it comes to exit fees from various countries? All Smokey is saying is that the US should match its policies to that of other countries. If they charge American citizens an exit fee, then the US should charge their citizens an equal exit fee for the same circumstances.

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sierra01
50 minutes ago, Headshot said:

What difference does it make? Do you think that if Smokey answers one way or another, it somehow makes his opinion more or less relevant when it comes to exit fees from various countries? All Smokey is saying is that the US should match its policies to that of other countries. If they charge American citizens an exit fee, then the US should charge their citizens an equal exit fee for the same circumstances.

It's a good idea, it would make certain countries think twice about that, and other various fees they charge.

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smokey
1 hour ago, MickyG said:

smokey are you a visitor? or a longer term stayer on residential avoidance?

 

As opposed to a genuine tourist who visits and leaves on their journey

Even my wife has to pay everyone pays 

1 hour ago, Headshot said:

What difference does it make? Do you think that if Smokey answers one way or another, it somehow makes his opinion more or less relevant when it comes to exit fees from various countries? All Smokey is saying is that the US should match its policies to that of other countries. If they charge American citizens an exit fee, then the US should charge their citizens an equal exit fee for the same circumstances.

Correct

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1 hour ago, Headshot said:

What difference does it make? Do you think that if Smokey answers one way or another, it somehow makes his opinion more or less relevant when it comes to exit fees from various countries? All Smokey is saying is that the US should match its policies to that of other countries. If they charge American citizens an exit fee, then the US should charge their citizens an equal exit fee for the same circumstances.

My question had nothing to do with reciprocal arrangements, Shame that you did not see that or choose to answer a question you did not understand. A perfectly good answer to a question that what  never asked is still a fail.

 

My point was pretty simple is that there are plenty of places to visit that do not demand a good bye tax as method of gratitude for boosting GDP.  The other side of the coin is if they do not charge a visa fee then an exist fee is better understood and accepted.

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Departure tax - Terminal fee

I am pretty sure that all airports charge a terminal fee for each passenger

who else to pay for the facilities of the terminals

The fee may or may not be included in the airline ticket price

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Departure_tax

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A departure tax is a fee charged (under various names) by a country when a person is leaving the country.

Some countries charge a departure tax only when a person is leaving by air. Various rules apply to the payment of the tax, including payment at the airport to those about to catch a flight (sometimes only in the local currency and sometimes by credit card), or by some prepayment method, or it may be charged to the airlines and included in the airline ticket price.

 

Here is an incomplete list:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Departure_tax

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