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Dafey

An abundance of seafood

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RangerUp
Posted (edited)
8 hours ago, Soupeod said:

I am sure you could find them in Cebu with as many members who shop the wet markets.

I haven't seem them in Cebu, not in any malls or markets. Anyone else?

 

edit: lobsters

Edited by RangerUp

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Cebuandrew

At the main market in Bantayan, all I've seen is the occasional smaller rock lobsters. No colors to them. Here, the best is the large black tiger prawns that one can get for around p400/kilo fresh caught. Take a kilo home, butterfly and devein them, quarter stick of butter and a clove of fresh minced garlic. That is heaven to me.

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Soupeod
1 hour ago, RangerUp said:

I haven't seem them in Cebu, not in any malls or markets. Anyone else?

 

edit: lobsters

Wow, im not sure where they are catching them. They look just like Oztony’s. 600₱ - 700₱ a kilo

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JamesMusslewhite
Posted (edited)
On 5/13/2019 at 9:34 AM, PlanB said:

P2000 for a complete live lobster dinner, veggies, baked potato, hot real butter, in a U.S restaurant-  with assurance it will be cooked just right or immediately corrected. Better health controls, ingredients. Cost of living 5 higher?? Philippines more expensive with no hot water, a cook making P400 a day, no guarantee of food quality. If I knew how to cook it myself those thoughts would be negated. Maybe the lobsters here in Phils are worth it and someday I will understand the restaurant pricing.

It depends on the species as to the pricing of the lobsters. These are the 8 Panulirus species found in the waters around the islands here.

589133733_spinylobstersofAsian-Pacific2(2)(Large).thumb.png.c5412fa9c0892e20321c32cb97b515e7.png

Of those 8 Panulirus species these three species yield the highest 'Buyer's' and 'Market' prices; these are the 'ornatus' (Tiger), 'versicolor' (bamboo) and the 'homarus' (scalloped). Of those three it is the Panulirus 'ornatus' which yields the highest 'live-delivery' prices in Japan, S. Korea, Singapore, Taiwan, Hong Kong and Mainland China.

941523065_Panulirusornatus(Large).thumb.jpg.69882822e5d25bb1d0eb8ed76a3b1474.jpg  

It is priced for it's natural sweet taste and creamy textured flesh and excellent for Sushi and Sashimi dishes and prized for it's colorful shell as a centerpiece display for banquets, weddings and celebrations. They have been proven to taste better than the clawed cold-water species of N. America and Europe and yields 23% more editable meat. They also grow larger and taste better than the Panulirus species of the Americas. It is the undisputed king of the lobster industry. I personally prefer them Sashimi style with either wasabi and soy sauce or nice sweet-chili ginger duck-sauce for dipping, with a side of steamed black rice and a quality bottle or two of warm rice wine. 

   As for steaming lobster I have found it best to use a 50/50 mix of Sprite cola and Red Horse rather than in saltwater. But I really prefer grilling them over steaming them as steaming tends to toughen the flesh and tends to have more of a bland taste. I suggest cutting then in half lengthwise and remove the digestive track. Then run a butter knife along both sides along the shell, as this helps prevent the flesh from sticking as it it grilling. Grilling adds more flavor from the wood smoke. Apply a healthy dribble of either olive oil or coconut oil before placing the shell into the grill, and apply the oil using a brush as the flesh is being grilled. This helps the flesh to retain it's moisture during the grilling, and a slow-grill is best. One can wrap the lobster halves in foil if you which to help retain moisture during grilling. Do not apply butter as the flesh is grilling as it actually dries the flesh making it tougher and more chewy. If you want butter than heat in a pan and use the butter as a dipping sauce, Add any desired seasonings to the butter (not the flesh) as the seasonings can also dry and toughen the flesh during grilling. Also if you over-season it does not ruin the lobster, and one only has to add more butter to the pan to thin the seasonings. Enjoy...

Edited by JamesMusslewhite
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oztony
13 hours ago, Soupeod said:

Wow, im not sure where they are catching them. They look just like Oztony’s. 600₱ - 700₱ a kilo

I should of reminded everyone that in Australia you pay way more for .... well everything...

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JamesMusslewhite
15 hours ago, Cebuandrew said:

At the main market in Bantayan, all I've seen is the occasional smaller rock lobsters. No colors to them. Here, the best is the large black tiger prawns that one can get for around p400/kilo fresh caught. Take a kilo home, butterfly and devein them, quarter stick of butter and a clove of fresh minced garlic. That is heaven to me.

Next time you grab a mess of prawns set a few aside. There is a Filipino sweet&sour sauce (orangish in color and thick as ketchup) which is perfect to use as a glaze. Simply brush the prawns as they are grilling. You just might find a new favorite.

sweet-and-sour-sauce.jpg

It is also good for grilling fish, chicken and meatballs...

 

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Cebuandrew
36 minutes ago, JamesMusslewhite said:

There is a Filipino sweet&sour sauce

Yup, the standard lumpia dipping sauce. Good idea actually. Gonna give it a try. I imagine 1-minute on each side over a hot grill??

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Davaoeno

Filipino Hillbillys ??

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JamesMusslewhite
Posted (edited)
3 hours ago, Davaoeno said:

Filipino Hillbillys ??

Yep I hear that, just how a Sweet & Sour Asian sauce equates to a hillbilly.com site is a bit odd to me to.

 But I do live deep among Filipino hillbillies, NPA and sea-peoples, where I strangely feel quite at home, I guess it must be due to my upbringing among South Texas river-rats, bayou/swamp-folks and coastal bay-trash folks. But them folks sure learn ya how to cook up a mess of tasty squiggly-wigglies and sea-bugs...     

Edited by JamesMusslewhite
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JamesMusslewhite

   Now I live on a small 8 hector island which is thin and long, and on the outer edge of a deep-water mangrove. A few times a month when the moon, tide and wave action is right; my wife will inform me as she says, ''time to go scrounging''. She grabs her goggles, pole-net floating bucket and underwater flashlight and she goes scrounging. It can take her several hours to walk the shallows to the end of the shoreline and back. Most time she returns with a wide assortment of shells and various sea-critters. She makes what we jokingly call 'road-kill' stew, which is actually a creamy thick adobo which is usually quite incredible. She catches squid, octopus, crabs, shrimp, scallops, clams and an assortment of shells and crustaceans. It is quite a treat to sit down to a steamy heap of fresh new-harvest rice smothered thick in a meaty creamy adobo sauce is a Filipino treat. Freshly plucked and cooked in less than an hour is about as fresh as seafood can be, Wolfgang Pluck would be both envious and jealous. Then to enjoy the fare in a quite seaside bungalow sitting only mere feet from the shoreline  makes for quite an enjoyable dining experience. Living on a quite secluded island does have it's charm.

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JamesMusslewhite
5 hours ago, Cebuandrew said:

Yup, the standard lumpia dipping sauce. Good idea actually. Gonna give it a try. I imagine 1-minute on each side over a hot grill??

That should do it. I also found a light rub of curry powder before placing on the grill and then bushing on the Sweet&Sour is quite tasty. I make a dipping sauce using hot-horseradish and yellow Asian mustard to work well with that combo. It makes the hot mustard dipping sauce commonly used on Chinese style egg rolls. As shrimp are my absolute favorite vegetable I have learned quite a few ways to grill those sea-bugs.

 

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