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Rwtom

Roof Design Problem

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colemanlee

I attempted to fix that exact problem a few years ago...what I ended up doing was cutting the roof back about six inches and installing plastic pipe (12" diameter) cut in half where the edge of the roof was.  I carried the pipe the entire length of the roof so it drained out the front and rear of the house.  It fixed the problem except in huge downpours like you get with typhoons...

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Bama

As beat up as the last 2 feet of roofing looks in the pic, I could see possible leakage between the the corrugated metal roof joints themselves.

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to_dave007
6 hours ago, colemanlee said:

I attempted to fix that exact problem a few years ago...what I ended up doing was cutting the roof back about six inches and installing plastic pipe (12" diameter) cut in half where the edge of the roof was.  I carried the pipe the entire length of the roof so it drained out the front and rear of the house.  It fixed the problem except in huge downpours like you get with typhoons...

I was thinking the same thing in response to this thread..  about a larger diameter plastic pipe..  but wasn't sure how easy it is to buy at that size.

For the OP...

 - make sure you have a nice positive slope in the gutter to make sure the water flows even in the heaviest rain.

- I like the idea of oversizing the down spouts

- also wondering how to avoid water "splashing" out of the gutter during heavy rain

 

 

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fred42

The gutter is where??? We need a picture of it.
Dont worry..It would not surprise me if one never existed. (not saying that it doesn't exist!)

Edited by fred42

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Rwtom
13 hours ago, Headshot said:

Leakage like this is due to buildings being built right up to the property line. It is a fact that it sometimes rains so hard here that gutters overflow (even if there is no debris in the gutter or downspout). Downspouts are often undersized anyway, so they can't handle the water volume created by the roof size. However, there would likely be a leak in this situation even if the gutter and downspout were properly sized and the water was draining on the outside of the wall. CHB walls are porous, so water will come right through them.

If you really want to stop the leak, tear off the roof, and rebuild it so the slope the entire roof runs away from this property line (provided the other side of the house isn't also against a property line). Sloping a roof toward and property line like this is just asking for trouble. Then, make sure the gutter and downspout are out from the wall and properly sized to handle the water volume that can be generated by the area. Also, make sure that the downspouts drain far away from the walls of the house (into a street or cistern would be best).

Yeah, I was considering replacing the roof, because it does look like it needs it. It might look odd to slope it all in one direction, but it's worth considering. On the other side of the house is a 3' walkway. And that currently has a gutter for the other half of the roof. So that's a possibility

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Rwtom
11 hours ago, colemanlee said:

I attempted to fix that exact problem a few years ago...what I ended up doing was cutting the roof back about six inches and installing plastic pipe (12" diameter) cut in half where the edge of the roof was.  I carried the pipe the entire length of the roof so it drained out the front and rear of the house.  It fixed the problem except in huge downpours like you get with typhoons...

I was thinking about something like that, but didn't know if that size pipe was available there. I was also considering shipping them a waterproof underlayment, that could be placed in the cement trough. As I inquired more about it; I found out there is no metal gutter as I was thinking. It's just a cement trough.

51 minutes ago, fred42 said:

The gutter is where??? We need a picture of it.
Dont worry..It would not surprise me if one never existed. (not saying that it doesn't exist!)

Your'e right; After inquiring about it more, I found out there is no metal gutter as I was thinking. It's just a cement trough.

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Davaoeno
13 minutes ago, Rwtom said:

I was thinking about something like that, but didn't know if that size pipe was available there. I was also considering shipping them a waterproof underlayment, that could be placed in the cement trough. As I inquired more about it; I found out there is no metal gutter as I was thinking. It's just a cement trough.

Your'e right; After inquiring about it more, I found out there is no metal gutter as I was thinking. It's just a cement trough.

There are products on the market you apply with a brush over concrete which seals it from water seepage .  . Some even say you can apply it underwater.

 

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Bama

Perhaps now is the time to consider installing a gutter and attaching it to your neighbors wall.

There are gutters in the PI that could handle an excessive amount of rain. Eyeballing the gutters on the front of my house and they appear to be 10 inchs tall and 6 inches wide.Replace the damaged roofing and install gutters might help a bit. Can't be sure without more pics.

Edited by Bama

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Rwtom
On 11/22/2018 at 5:14 PM, Bama said:

Perhaps now is the time to consider installing a gutter and attaching it to your neighbors wall.

There are gutters in the PI that could handle an excessive amount of rain. Eyeballing the gutters on the front of my house and they appear to be 10 inchs tall and 6 inches wide.Replace the damaged roofing and install gutters might help a bit. Can't be sure without more pics.

The wall in the picture isn't the neighbors, it's the wall of the house of my mil. the one with the red roof. The neighbor recently attached an addition to their home to her wall. And did some of the damage seen on the red roof by trampling on it while working on their addition. 

But yes, I agree. I think she needs a new roof and gutter. And was looking for ideas how to have it done so that heavy rain wouldn't backup and leak into her house.

I know it's hard to see with the picture. It's actually hard to see even in person. Will probably need to open the ceiling and try to see what's happening. I will do that when I return next month.

thanks for the feedback

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Headshot

If you replace the roof, just have the new roof drain away from the wall. All of the problems will be solved. And the wall is plenty high enough to do that. Make sure there is a good seal between the wall and the roof, too.

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