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Rwtom

Roof Design Problem

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Rwtom

My mother in laws house has a poorly designed roof & gutter system. Because it adjoins the neighbors house, the gutter is directly on top of the wall. And the roof edge is aligned with the inside of the wall. So when it rains really hard it fills up and leaks into the house. It’s been ‘repaired ‘ many times. Stops leaking temporarily and then starts again. I assume they’re filling the gap between the gutter and the corrugated roofing. But it’s not holding. 

I’m wondering if anyone has a good suggestion for a new roof design. I can’t think of a good solution, since the roof can’t extend beyond the outside of the wall. Any ideas?

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Edited by Rwtom
Added a picture

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to_dave007

Can you try to show us what's underneath the roof right close to the wall?  So we can see why the water can't just run down the inside of the wall, and so we can see what you have to work with inside.. under the roof..

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fred42
2 hours ago, Rwtom said:

I assume they’re filling the gap between the gutter and the corrugated roofing.

What gutter?

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Rwtom

There’s a gutter just below the roof. It’s not visible in the picture. But it feeds into a downspo

2 hours ago, to_dave007 said:

Can you try to show us what's underneath the roof right close to the wall?  So we can see why the water can't just run down the inside of the wall, and so we can see what you have to work with inside.. under the roof..

Currently it’s covered by the ceiling. I was looking for general ideas before we tore into it. I’m not there now. Probably will be next month 

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to_dave007

The existing gutter may get filled with debris..  like leaves etc..  and block the downspout from time to time and lead to the flooding you mention.  Not sure what best way to prevent that would be..  maybe bigger downspout.  Can't prevent leaves being up there.

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Rwtom
27 minutes ago, to_dave007 said:

The existing gutter may get filled with debris..  like leaves etc..  and block the downspout from time to time and lead to the flooding you mention.  Not sure what best way to prevent that would be..  maybe bigger downspout.  Can't prevent leaves being up there.

Right, I thought that debris might be the problem. She had someone clean it out. It still leaked.

I was thinking about a bigger downspout. And there’s another downspout that tees into this one. Definitely need to separate them.

thanks

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Woolf

Cover the gutter with a net, something like shown here

 

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to_dave007
1 hour ago, Rwtom said:

Right, I thought that debris might be the problem. She had someone clean it out. It still leaked.

I was thinking about a bigger downspout. And there’s another downspout that tees into this one. Definitely need to separate them.

thanks

I had downspout get plugged up back in Canada once..  and water backs up right up to the roof. problem happened at a bend

Edited by to_dave007

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oztony

Insufficient gutter volume and downspout for heavy rain ...possible partly blocked drain..

If unable to increase gutter size or add additional downspouts ..create an overflow relief at either or both ends of the guttering that is lower than the inside of the gutter profile ...so at least the water will flow out of the end of the gutter run instead of over flowing to the inside of the building...

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Headshot

Leakage like this is due to buildings being built right up to the property line. It is a fact that it sometimes rains so hard here that gutters overflow (even if there is no debris in the gutter or downspout). Downspouts are often undersized anyway, so they can't handle the water volume created by the roof size. However, there would likely be a leak in this situation even if the gutter and downspout were properly sized and the water was draining on the outside of the wall. CHB walls are porous, so water will come right through them.

If you really want to stop the leak, tear off the roof, and rebuild it so the slope the entire roof runs away from this property line (provided the other side of the house isn't also against a property line). Sloping a roof toward and property line like this is just asking for trouble. Then, make sure the gutter and downspout are out from the wall and properly sized to handle the water volume that can be generated by the area. Also, make sure that the downspouts drain far away from the walls of the house (into a street or cistern would be best).

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Davaoeno
35 minutes ago, Headshot said:

Leakage like this is due to buildings being built right up to the property line. It is a fact that it sometimes rains so hard here that gutters overflow (even if there is no debris in the gutter or downspout). Downspouts are often undersized anyway, so they can't handle the water volume created by the roof size. However, there would likely be a leak in this situation even if the gutter and downspout were properly sized and the water was draining on the outside of the wall. CHB walls are porous, so water will come right through them.

If you really want to stop the leak, tear off the roof, and rebuild it so the slope the entire roof runs away from this property line (provided the other side of the house isn't also against a property line). Sloping a roof toward and property line like this is just asking for trouble. Then, make sure the gutter and downspout are out from the wall and properly sized to handle the water volume that can be generated by the area. Also, make sure that the downspouts drain far away from the walls of the house (into a street or cistern would be best).

It sounds like the 600 pesos quick fix just became an   80,000 peso reno !! lol

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oztony
23 minutes ago, Headshot said:

 If you really want to stop the leak, tear off the roof, and rebuild it so the slope the entire roof runs away from this property line (provided the other side of the house isn't also against a property line).  Sloping a roof toward and property line like this is just asking for trouble.

What do you suggest Bill if the other side of the roof does also abut a wall on the property line ....move the house...

Zero lot building (right on the boundary) is a common thing in condensed area's  , the roof does look like it needs to be replaced but I get the feeling that the OP is looking for reasonable suggestions on how to mitigate this existing problem or he would have posted "where to purchase corrugate iron roofing" from ....

With what looks like a tree (with the green foliage) to the rear of the property it would be feasible to think that excess water could be diverted through an overflow relief at the end of the gutter run at that end in the least ... 

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Headshot
1 hour ago, oztony said:

What do you suggest Bill if the other side of the roof does also abut a wall on the property line ....move the house...

I know the OP is probably looking for a cheap fix. Since everybody was just throwing out suggestions like, "clean the gutters", I figured that somebody should at least say that there may not be a cheap fix to this problem (IF the OP is actually interested in a fix). Rain water that is drained toward a wall will inevitably cause problems inside the house (since rain here is often so hard that no gutter can contain it).

On any house, there has to be at least one side that is free from obstruction (or else you couldn't access the house). The answer may be to slope the roof toward that side of the house (that is free of obstructions). Of course, if there is no clear side of the house, then the MIL is SOL, and there will always be water in her house after hard rains. Not all problems have cheap and easy solutions. Some have no solution at all.

Edited by Headshot
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Davaoeno
7 minutes ago, Headshot said:

On any house, there has to be at least one side that is free from obstruction (or else you couldn't access the house).

hahaha  You do not seem to be very familiar with house construction here in the Philippines.  Many times I have seen someone just use the wall of an already existing house as the wall of their new house.  [ every house has a front, a back and 2 sides ]

I am sure that someone will not accept  your attitude that the MIL is SOL - since filipinos have learned that there is a solution to every problem . It might not be fancy , it might not be beautiful- but nobody lives in the street because they are SOL and can not access their home !!

Edited by Davaoeno

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Headshot
1 minute ago, Davaoeno said:

hahaha  You do not seem to be very familiar with house construction here in the Philippines.  Many times I have seen someone just use the wall of an already existing house as the wall of their new house.  

I am sure that someone will not accept  your attitude that the MIL is SOL - since filipinos have learned that there is a solution to every problem . It might not be fancy , it might not be beautiful- but nobody lives in the street because they are SOL and can not access their home !!

I am VERY familiar with house construction in the Philippines. Little or no thought often goes into the planning process, and this kind of problem pops up a lot. Poor people, living in poor areas, often build structures with no plans, and no thought. That doesn't make the problem any less. I said that IF the MIL's house has no open side to drain the water, then she is SOL (as in, she will always have water drainage problems). Nobody said she will be out on the street. Judging by the age of the roof in the picture, she has lived with this problem for a long time already.

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