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Janneo

Identify This Snake

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Janneo
2 hours ago, Kreole said:

That is definitely a cobra.  You can tell by the nose and head scale configuration and by the eyes which are close to the nose.  If you were bitten, and have not suffered any ill effects, then it was a dry bite in which no venom was injected.  Very likely the snake was as surprised as you were and immediately struck out without loading venom.  But once the snake was hiding, you can bet it was in full defensive mode and ready to kill if attacked. 

Consider yourself an extremely fortunate person.  Anytime you see 2 holes together, then most certainly it was a snake bite, and the fact you did not notice it right away was probably due to high Adrenalin running through your body and that cobra fangs are not long and do not penetrate very far.  In addition, because of the short fangs, the cobra actually has to chew when biting in order to inject the venom.

Thank you for posting this. Far more facts about this snake than I have been able to find myself.

I realize how this could have ended far worse. Even if I was not actually bitten, I could have been, especially while I was unaware of it being near me. I am still too anxious and on edge to really feel fortunate although I know I am. 

At least this experience has made me much more careful and aware of the dangers. 

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Jawny
4 hours ago, Janneo said:

Thank you for posting this. Far more facts about this snake than I have been able to find myself.

I realize how this could have ended far worse. Even if I was not actually bitten, I could have been, especially while I was unaware of it being near me. I am still too anxious and on edge to really feel fortunate although I know I am. 

At least this experience has made me much more careful and aware of the dangers. 

If you get a chance, you might want to examine the surroundings for potential hiding places for snakes.  I had a snake pit right alongside my home.  Literally, many snakes inside a portion of the house.  Too complicated to try and explain, but when we built the house, there was a hollow space we’d covered with cement, but not particularly well built.  For many months, we were seeing snakes alongside our house and they would seem to disappear.  Turns out they were in the pit which we didn’t see.

One day an adult cobra came across our lawn directly toward the house which was puzzling.  We were able to distract and then dispatch the cobra.  I suspect he was hunting snakes and somehow detected the snake activity.  Paranoia perhaps.  We then made the discovery of the snake pit and cemented it over.

We also use screens or other ways to make it harder for snakes to enter the property.  Doesn’t exclude them completely, but gives us peace of mind.  We once caught one in a screen as it attempted to escape and got stuck with a full belly or pregnant body.

We keep rats and mice down as well, though that is also hard.  

Looking out for snakes is a way of life for us.  Just good housekeeping and awareness is our best hope of avoiding contact. 

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Janneo
4 hours ago, Jawny said:

If you get a chance, you might want to examine the surroundings for potential hiding places for snakes.  I had a snake pit right alongside my home.  Literally, many snakes inside a portion of the house.  Too complicated to try and explain, but when we built the house, there was a hollow space we’d covered with cement, but not particularly well built.  For many months, we were seeing snakes alongside our house and they would seem to disappear.  Turns out they were in the pit which we didn’t see.

One day an adult cobra came across our lawn directly toward the house which was puzzling.  We were able to distract and then dispatch the cobra.  I suspect he was hunting snakes and somehow detected the snake activity.  Paranoia perhaps.  We then made the discovery of the snake pit and cemented it over.

We also use screens or other ways to make it harder for snakes to enter the property.  Doesn’t exclude them completely, but gives us peace of mind.  We once caught one in a screen as it attempted to escape and got stuck with a full belly or pregnant body.

We keep rats and mice down as well, though that is also hard.  

Looking out for snakes is a way of life for us.  Just good housekeeping and awareness is our best hope of avoiding contact. 

Remind me to never move anywhere near where you are :-) 

Snakes was never a consideration when I moved out to the province. If I ever move again, a low prevalence of snakes surely will be on the wishlist. However it seems I got lucky in that aspect. This is actually the first snake I have seen here during more than a year. I remember asking a local after the move about snakes, and was told there are none. That probably made me too careless and nonchalant of the risk. Coming from a country where a bee sting is about the worst that can happen probably have not helped either.

I am taking your advice to heart and hope others do also. Thanks Jawny

 

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Jawny

Having snakes nearby is not as scary as it sounds.  Kinda like having mosquitoes.  As a side benefit of being close to nature we see many birds (those the snakes don’t eat) and have a fair number of monitor lizards (which feast in our tilapia). We’ve even had meerkats which compete with the feral cats. 

Frankly, we’ve only had animal related deaths/injuries in our community from rabid dogs. 

BTW, I’m curious just how such a large snake was inside your place....that is if it was inside. We had one snake in our house, but we think it was brought in with a basket of laundry. 

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Janneo
1 hour ago, Jawny said:

Having snakes nearby is not as scary as it sounds.  Kinda like having mosquitoes.  As a side benefit of being close to nature we see many birds (those the snakes don’t eat) and have a fair number of monitor lizards (which feast in our tilapia). We’ve even had meerkats which compete with the feral cats. 

Frankly, we’ve only had animal related deaths/injuries in our community from rabid dogs. 

BTW, I’m curious just how such a large snake was inside your place....that is if it was inside. We had one snake in our house, but we think it was brought in with a basket of laundry. 

Hehe, nice comparison. I'm happy you feel that way. The risk are probably low enough to not worry about it to much. Even though nature is close by, there is not much wild life here. Very few birds. A few occasional mice. Not much prey for a snake around. It will likely take another year until i see another snake.

It must have seen my open doors as an invitation and stepped right in. That will never  happen again. Until I can get some kind of screens installed the doors stays shut. Awareness level has gone up a few notches.

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Headshot
2 hours ago, Jawny said:

Having snakes nearby is not as scary as it sounds.  Kinda like having mosquitoes. 

I would much rather have snakes than mosquitoes. Snake eat vermin, whereas mosquitoes suck our blood and give us Dengue Fever, Malaria, Yellow Fever and a half-dozen other deadly diseases. Mosquitoes are about as useful and beneficial as big government.

Edited by Headshot
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Kreole
22 hours ago, Janneo said:

Thank you for posting this. Far more facts about this snake than I have been able to find myself.

I realize how this could have ended far worse. Even if I was not actually bitten, I could have been, especially while I was unaware of it being near me. I am still too anxious and on edge to really feel fortunate although I know I am. 

At least this experience has made me much more careful and aware of the dangers. 

One other little factoid is that the cobra in your photo is a Philippine Spitting Cobra which means it can spit its venom up to 8 feet in order to blind an adversary.  Here is a quote from wikipedia:  "The spitted venom is generally harmless on contact with mammalian skin (although contact can result in delayed blistering of the area), but can cause permanent blindness if introduced to the eye; if left untreated it may cause chemosis and corneal swelling."  So, a thorough rinsing of the eyes ASAP is necessary to avoid severe damage.  It should be noted that the cobra does not spit at its prey; it is only used in defensive mode which should disable an adversary and allow the cobra to escape.

Again, I am just guessing  that the cobra that bit you did not have time to muster its defenses in order elevate its head high enough to a position from which it could spit or effectively bite.  I am not a herpetologist, but I do a lot of natural history study because that is my main interest.  I am fascinated by all wildlife and am especially keen on those that inhabit Siquijor or the Philippines in general.  

I once had the experience of picking up a Blue Ringed Octopus to photograph it in my hand, where it managed to crawl off before I got a good pic, causing me to pick it up a second time and take some more pics of its beautiful coloring and brilliant blue ring patterns.  I only learned a couple of weeks later that that it produces one of the most toxic venoms in the world, far more lethal than many venomous snakes.  Unlike you, it did not bite me, but we share the same result of being alive to tell the tale.  Anyone wanting to see photos just pm me.

I think that any of us who live on remote islands must make peace with the fact that we would not make it to a medical facility in order to save our lives.  I just hope that I have the presence of mind to accept my fate and make my peace before I die without a lot of strangers crowding around me.

Edited by Kreole
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BossHog
On 10/22/2018 at 11:35 AM, Jawny said:

We’ve even had meerkats which compete with the feral cats.

There are no meerkats in the Philippines (except possibly in a private zoo). They are endemic to southern Africa.

Perhaps you're thinking of the Asian palm civet (Paradoxurus hermaphroditus).

 

 

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Jawny
18 minutes ago, BossHog said:

There are no meerkats in the Philippines (except possibly in a private zoo). They are endemic to southern Africa.

Perhaps you're thinking of the Asian palm civet (Paradoxurus hermaphroditus).

 

 

Thanks for spotting my error.  I failed to use the correct name.  We have seen civets, more than once.  In fact, my BIL discovered one nesting (sleeping) in his CR area.  

The first one we saw, was actually a skeleton.  The carcass had been consumed by ants, so we saw this critter we thought had been a squirrel. I was amazed as I had never seen a squirrel here.  Turns out, it was a civet.  

We're pretty sure the resident ones feast on the cocoa trees we have.  

The one my BIL discovered became lunch.  Too bad, as they seem to be generally harmless. 

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BossHog
5 minutes ago, Jawny said:

I was amazed as I had never seen a squirrel here.

We get a lot of the Philippine pygmy squirrels on our property. You seem to see them most often at daybreak on a rainy morning. One of my photos:

870610381_pps-feat(Medium).thumb.jpg.f13c7bd5e3cdb20b7ea4dac3b6557189.jpg

Sorry for dragging us way off-topic but I'm kinda keen on the wildlife here.

 

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Janneo
6 hours ago, BossHog said:

Sorry for dragging us way off-topic but I'm kinda keen on the wildlife here.

 

Well, I clicked on your blog link and found some info on venomous snakes in the Philippines, so still on topic. :-)

Anyway, my question has been answered so I don't mind.

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juhaerik

Yes, this is 99,9% Philippine Cobra - with most potent venom of Asian cobras. And it spits too...

home-herp

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RogerDuMond

Here is another request for identification of a snake. It was about four foot long, thin, gray with orange spots on the back, white stripes on the head, two small circular spots on the head between the white lines, and large eyes.

snake.jpg.aeeba634f19d8549a4b7a3b8b4b0f648.jpg

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oztony

Would that be a Philippine Cobra ? the markings appear to be a cobra family type .....

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Headshot
Posted (edited)

I believe that is a paradise tree snake.

1415777346_Paradisetreesnake.jpg.03ac3816ce7f58144e82b6620b534121.jpg

It is a rear-fanged mildly-venomous snake. They are also called flying snakes because they launch themselves from tree to tree.

Edited by Headshot
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