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Grandfather of Toddler Who Fell From Royal Caribbean Cruise Ship Arrested

By Jim Walker on October 28, 2019

The Associated Press reports tonight that a grandfather who police say dropped the young child from the Freedom of the Seas docked in Puerto Rico last in July has arrested on charges of negligent homicide in the child’s death.

Today, a judge ordered the arrest of Salvatore Anello after state prosecutors submitted evidence that the 2 year-old girl fell to the pavement when he raised her up to an open window on the Royal Caribbean cruise ship.

We reported on the incident on July 7, 2019 – Two Year Old Child Dies After Falling From Freedom of the Seas.

ABC News initially reported that police said that the grandfather of the little girl from Indiana told officers he lost his grip while holding her outside a window on the 11th story of the cruise ship. Later, the family’s Miami lawyer said that the grandfather lifted her up and put her on a railing on the mistaken belief that there there is a glass window at that location.

I explained to a newspaper that proving negligence won’t be an easy feat for the family: “In order for a cruise line to be legally liable for this child’s death, the family’s lawyer must prove that the cruise line acted unreasonably and that the cruise line knew or should have known of the specific danger on its ship . . .  This will be an exceedingly difficult burden for the lawyer to meet in this very sad and tragic set of circumstances. Without evidence (prior incidents or proof that the cruise line knew of a dangerous condition on the cruise ship) the chances are slim that the court (if suit is filed) would permit this case to proceed to a jury trial.”

As we previously reported, there have been relatively few situations where toddlers have fallen from upper decks on cruise ships. In 2012, a 14 month old toddler fell from deck 12 to deck 11 on the Monarch of the Seas and was injured.  The ship turned around and returned to Port Canaveral, Florida, where the child received urgent medical care and recovered.

The grandfather is reportedly being held on $80,000 bond and is scheduled to appear in court on November 20th.

https://www.cruiselawnews.com/2019/10/articles/crime/grandfather-of-toddler-who-fell-from-royal-caribbean-cruise-ship-arrested/?fbclid=IwAR2wgUlhoyZYpMSdBWWoj7cQQY9DcbXQkO_LaaL4AFUkcKpiX4Lr-dkL3Eg

 

 

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Kabisay-an gid

Cruise Line: Princess Cruises 

10-Day Malaysian Peninsula & Indonesia Cruise

Ship: Sapphire Princess

Port of Departure: Singapore 

Singapore > Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia > Penang, Malaysia > Phuket, Thailand > Bali, Indonesia > Singapore 

From  $1,586 per cabin with 2 pax. Air, Insurance and transfers are not included in this price.

https://www.princess.com/cruise-search/details?voyageCode=H010

 

 

 

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Kabisay-an gid
On 10/29/2019 at 3:52 AM, Salty Dog said:

Grandfather of Toddler Who Fell From Royal Caribbean Cruise Ship Arrested

By Jim Walker on October 28, 2019

The Associated Press reports tonight that a grandfather who police say dropped the young child from the Freedom of the Seas docked in Puerto Rico last in July has arrested on charges of negligent homicide in the child’s death.

Today, a judge ordered the arrest of Salvatore Anello after state prosecutors submitted evidence that the 2 year-old girl fell to the pavement when he raised her up to an open window on the Royal Caribbean cruise ship.

We reported on the incident on July 7, 2019 – Two Year Old Child Dies After Falling From Freedom of the Seas.

ABC News initially reported that police said that the grandfather of the little girl from Indiana told officers he lost his grip while holding her outside a window on the 11th story of the cruise ship. Later, the family’s Miami lawyer said that the grandfather lifted her up and put her on a railing on the mistaken belief that there there is a glass window at that location.

I explained to a newspaper that proving negligence won’t be an easy feat for the family: “In order for a cruise line to be legally liable for this child’s death, the family’s lawyer must prove that the cruise line acted unreasonably and that the cruise line knew or should have known of the specific danger on its ship . . .  This will be an exceedingly difficult burden for the lawyer to meet in this very sad and tragic set of circumstances. Without evidence (prior incidents or proof that the cruise line knew of a dangerous condition on the cruise ship) the chances are slim that the court (if suit is filed) would permit this case to proceed to a jury trial.”

As we previously reported, there have been relatively few situations where toddlers have fallen from upper decks on cruise ships. In 2012, a 14 month old toddler fell from deck 12 to deck 11 on the Monarch of the Seas and was injured.  The ship turned around and returned to Port Canaveral, Florida, where the child received urgent medical care and recovered.

The grandfather is reportedly being held on $80,000 bond and is scheduled to appear in court on November 20th.

https://www.cruiselawnews.com/2019/10/articles/crime/grandfather-of-toddler-who-fell-from-royal-caribbean-cruise-ship-arrested/?fbclid=IwAR2wgUlhoyZYpMSdBWWoj7cQQY9DcbXQkO_LaaL4AFUkcKpiX4Lr-dkL3Eg

 

 

My sincere condolences to the family on the loss of their little girl, but suing Royal Caribbean won't bring back the child, nor change the fact that ol' Grandpa is a monumental dumbass. Gramps was criminally negligent - it was a large window, there's no way he didn't know it was open. Helen Keller could've been able to tell it was open. 

 

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Why Cruise Lines Keep Cutting Their Ships in Half

The economics of cruising are as fascinating as they are counterintuitive.

A few weeks ago, John Delaney, president of Seattle-based Windstar Cruises, stood on a scaffold at a historic shipyard in Palermo, Italy, and took a blowtorch to the Star Breeze, a 30-year-old, 212-passenger motor yacht.

With sparks flying, and shipyard workers and invited guests cheering him on, Delany made the final vertical cut to chop Star Breeze in half. But he was hardly destroying the small ship—he was doing just the opposite.

In a process called “stretching,” the Star Breeze is getting pulled apart to make room for a new, 84-foot, 1,250-ton prefab midsection addition. Think of it like unsnapping (or unwelding) two Legos and putting another block in between. But with a boat.

After four months of surgery, the all-suite Star Breeze will be bigger, more luxurious, and more profitable. When she debuts again in February, she’ll have 50 new suites to house 100 additional guests, a 50% increase in passenger capacity, and command higher rates for her shiny new cabins. Delaney says it should add at least 20 years to the ship’s life span.

Stretching, it turns out, is so good for Windstar’s bottom line that the company will similarly expand two more ships by the end of 2020, spending a total $250 million to increase its overall capacity by 24%.

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Sliced and waiting, Silversea’s Silver Spirit during its 2018 stretching.

The Big Idea

Stretching cruise ships is hardly a new idea. Teijo Niemela, editor of CruiseBusiness.com, says the concept was borrowed from Scandinavian ferries that were sliced to add cargo space. He sailed on his first stretched ferry in Finland in 1972.

It was only six years later that Royal Caribbean added an 85-foot block to first expand a ship, the Song of Norway, starting a slow but steady industry trend. The defunct Royal Viking Line stretched ships in the 1980s; Norwegian Cruise Line added sections to three ships in the 1990s. More recently, MSC Cruises lengthened four ships and has announced plans to slice a fifth. The $143 million project, scheduled for 2021, will add 75,000 square feet to the MSC Magnifica, comprising 215 new staterooms (most of them in the popular balcony category), two restaurants, and a water park, as well as technology that’s more environmentally friendly.

Last year in Palermo, ultraluxury line Silversea added a 49-foot midsection to its Silver Spirit at a cost of $70 million, increasing the ship’s capacity from 540 to 608 passengers by adding 34 suites. It took 500 workers and about 450,000 man hours to complete the stretch.

“For cruise lines, it’s a quicker way to expand capacity compared to building a new cruise ship,” Niemela says. “A new cruise ship takes about 22 months or more [to build]. Add a new midsection, and it’s only a few months that the ship is out of service.”

Doing the Math

With estimates of about $175 million to build a 300-plus passenger vessel, stretching the older ones made more sense, Delaney says, especially when each project costs an average $80 million.

By lengthening its ships, Windstar will add 150 suites that will go for an average $450 to $550 per person per night. With those 300 additional passengers, the six-ship line, owned by Denver billionaire Philip Anschutz’ Anschutz Corp., could add more than $49.2 million in annual revenue.

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Silversea added a 49-foot midsection to its Silver Spirit at cost of $70 million.

There are also benefits downstream. While the guts of the ships are open, Windstar is replacing seven outdated engines with four new Wartsila engines that will meet the International Maritime Organization’s tougher emissions standards.

“Not only do we get to leverage the fuel against more people, we’re putting in much more fuel-efficient, energy saving, state-of-the-art engine technology,” Delaney says. “We get the benefit of that and reduced repairs and maintenance with the new engines.”

Fixed costs don’t change much when a ship is stretched. Build a new one, and you have to fully staff it; expand an old one, and it’s a matter of a few extra hires to maintain the same crew-to-guest ratio. (That, and a slightly longer shopping list to stock the kitchens.)

“The flow through on the extra hundred guests, that revenue, almost 90% goes to the bottom line,” Delaney says. “It’s significant. The return on the investment was much, much higher on the stretch.”

The Cutting Edge

The entire stretching process happens on a dry dock where workers have access to all sides of a ship—including the bottom—and can manually torch through structural walls with ease. There’s no room for error when your 13,000-ton yacht needs to (literally) stay afloat.

Six such stretchings, including those by Windstar, Silversea, and MSC Cruises, plus another two for ferries, have taken place over the last five years at the Palermo yard of Italian master shipbuilder Fincantieri SpA.

Once all the guts of a ship are removed, including pipes and cabling, engineers pull the front half of the ship forward on giant blocks, then use self-propelled platforms on wheels to maneuver a prefabricated middle section into place before welding it all back together. Unlike Frankenstein, Star Breeze will bear no visible scars when it leaves the shipyard early next year.

As with Silversea’s expansion of the Silver Spirit, which added, among other things, a seafood and steak restaurant, pizza parlor, outdoor aerobics studio, and additional sunny places for lounging, Star Breeze will also get upgrades along the way.

“When those ships were built [in the 1980s], things like a big pool, a really nice spa, a great gym weren’t as important,” Delaney says. Today, he notes, they’re expected. Star Breeze’s new pool is five times larger, and the fitness center now has a yoga studio. Other upgrades include a 1,374-square-foot, three-bedroom Grand Owner’s Suite and a handful of restaurants.

Plus, the ship’s profile gets longer, sleeker, and prettier. “It’s no longer short and stubby like a hatchback,” he laughs.

800x-1 (2).jpg
The finished Silver Spirit.

https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2019-12-04/why-cruise-lines-keep-cutting-their-ships-in-half-for-stretching

 

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Family of Chloe Wiegand, who died falling from cruise ship, sues Royal Caribbean

“This is not some freak accident,” the family's lawyer said of the death of the 18-month-old. “This is something that was a preventable accident.”

Dec. 11, 2019, By Ben Kesslen

The parents of an 18-month-old who fell to her death from an open window on a Royal Caribbean cruise ship in July announced Wednesday that they are suing the cruise line, contending that the accident was the company’s fault.

Alan Wiegand and Kimberly Schultz Wiegand, of South Bend, Indiana, were on a Royal Caribbean cruise ship in Puerto Rico when their daughter, Chloe, fell out of an open window from the ship's 11th story while she was in the care of her grandfather, Salvatore Anello.

191029-chloe-wiegand-al-1105_1a4a1d62306371f776ee2c786ce8d1e1.fit-560w.jpg
Salvatore Anello with his granddaughter Chloe Wiegand.

Anello, who had placed Chloe near a window prior to her fall, has been charged with negligent homicide in her death. The grandfather told CBS News in November that he “thought there was glass” in the window pane, adding that “if there was some kind of warning sign there, we wouldn't have ever been near it.”

The lawsuit says Chloe was with her mother in a children's water park area on the pool's 11th deck, and that when the mother had to go attend to another matter, Anello came to supervise the child.

"Mr. Anello was closely supervising Chloe as she played," the suit says. When at one point "Chloe walked over to a nearby wall of glass on the same deck," her grandfather followed her.

191211-royal-caribbean-chloe-wiegand-fall-cs-814a_ef9ff82aa145b29a2e8c9dff1d9a3900.fit-560w.jpg
The wall of glass featured three rows of glass, floor to ceiling, with a wooden rail between the middle and bottom rows.

"Unknown to Mr. Anello at that time, this was not, in fact, a wall of fixed glass," the suit says. Instead, some of the glass panes in the middle row could be opened by anyone, including other passengers.

In addition, a wooden rail that was about 18 inches from the wall of windows kept Anello far enough away that he could not tell a window in front of him had been slid all the way open, the suit says.

Upon reaching the windows, Chloe asked to be lifted up so that she could bang on the glass as she frequently did at her brother’s hockey games, the suit says. Anello lifted her up onto the railing and held her as she leaned forward to bang on the glass that they thought to be in front of them.

But with no glass in the opening, "she slipped from Mr. Anello’s arms, falling through the open pane and down approximately 150 feet below" onto the pier in San Juan, killing her, the suit says.

191211-royal-caribbean-chloe-wiegand-fall-2-cs-814a_ef9ff82aa145b29a2e8c9dff1d9a3900.fit-360w.jpg
The distance between the window and the railing.

https://www.nbcnews.com/news/us-news/family-chloe-wiegand-who-died-falling-cruise-ship-sues-royal-n1099576

 

 

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Kabisay-an gid

Carnival cruise ships collide in Cozumel, Mexico:

 

 

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Twas the Night Before Christmas - Cruise Ship Style!!

'Twas the night before Christmas, and far out at sea
Our vessel was sailing, as smooth as could be

The stockings were hung from the balcony chairs
With hope that St. Nicholas would find them out there

The children were nestled all snug in their uppers
Having just settled down from a Christmas Eve supper

And ma and myself, we were covered in aloe
A bit too much sun, in a pool, warm and shallow

When up in the sky, there arose such a clatter
I leapt from my bed to see what was the matter

To the balcony glass door, I flew like a flash
Well, more like a saunter, and less like a dash

And what to my skeptical eyes should appear
But a great shiny sleigh, and eight flying reindeer

They circled our ship, from starboard to port
As the moon lit the driver, a jolly old sort

Who called to his team, in a happy retort
"Now Dasher, now Dancer," so on and so forth

We raced through our cabin and into the hall
To the very top deck, in time for us all

To be awed by the sight of Old Santa's sleigh
As he lightly touched down, by the midnight buffet

With a bundle of goodies thrown over his back
He rose in the air and dropped down the smokestack

Santa went straight to work, and later we learned
He found every child's cabin, from the bow to the stern

Insides and ocean views, balconies and suites
Santa filled every stocking, with toys and with treats

Until all his deliveries had been handled with care
Then he noted he still had a minute to spare

So he surfed the wave rider, with nary a fall
While Dasher and Dancer scaled the rock-climbing wall

And Prancer, who had always been fond of the cold
Tried the ice-skating rink, a sight to behold

And then with a whistle, Santa summoned his team
And he bade us farewell, silent nights and sweet dreams

And I heard him exclaim, as he flew out of view
Merry Christmas to all, and to all, a good cruise!

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Carnival Corp. offers use of ships as floating hospitals

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Carnival Corp. has offered use of its ships as temporary hospitals for non-coronavirus patients to free up space at land-based hospitals to treat patients with Covid-19. 

President Trump announced at a press conference on Thursday that he had spoken with Carnival Corp. chairman Micky Arison on Thursday morning. “He’s going to make ships available,” he said.  

The president has already ordered that two Navy hospital ships be deployed to areas hits hard by coronavirus. The USNS Comfort will head to New York Harbor and the USNS New York will be dispatched to a location on the West Coast. If needed, the Carnival ships could supplement those efforts. 

“In addition to the big medical ships that you have coming, if we should need ships with lots of rooms, they will be docked at New York and Los Angeles and San Francisco, different places, so I want to thank Micky Arison. That’s Carnival Cruise Line,” the President said. 

In a statement shortly afterward, Carnival Corp. said that select ships from its many brands -- including Carnival Cruise Line, Holland America Line, Princess Cruises and P&O Cruises Australia -- would be made available to help with a possible shortage of land-based hospital beds. 

“As part of the offer, interested parties will be asked to cover only the essential costs of the ship’s operations while in port,” the company said. 

“If needed, cruise ships are capable of being quickly provisioned to serve as hospitals with up to 1,000 hospital rooms that can treat patients suffering from less critical, non-Covid-19 conditions,” Carnival Corp. said. 

Temporary cruise ship hospital rooms can be quickly converted to accommodate remote patient-monitoring devices over the ship’s high-speed WiFi network, the company said. The ships would be capable of providing cardiac, respiratory, oxygen saturation, and video-monitoring capabilities. Rooms have bathrooms, private balconies and isolation capabilities if needed.

The company said the ships would be able to provide up to seven intensive care units in their onboard medical centers with central cardiac monitoring, ventilators and other medical devices.

Carnival said various decks could house multiple medical functions, the company said.

 

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What Is the Economic Impact of the Cruise Industry in the United States?

Cruising is a global industry, with economic contributions that extend beyond the taxes cruise lines pay and the onboard personnel they employ. In the United States alone, cruise lines support a domino effect of businesses that ultimately employ hundreds of thousands of people and contribute billions of dollars to the economy.

A November 2019 report titled "The Contribution of the International Cruise Industry to the United States Economy" from the Cruise Lines International Association (CLIA), the industry's trade association, outlined the direct and indirect ways the international cruise industry creates its economic footprint. Cruise Critic took a look at that, as well as other reports, to examine the industry impact.

Employment & Expenditures

According to Statista, a provider of market and consumer data, the North American cruise industry directly employed about 246,000 people in in the United States and Canada in 2018.

Direct employment by the cruise lines in the U.S. (including those working in the lines' corporate offices and in call centers taking reservations) in accounted for wages and taxes paid to U.S. federal, state and local tax jurisdictions of $1.67 billion in 2018, according to CLIA's report.

The industry's impact on indirect jobs --  which can include anything from port services and taxi or bus drivers to food and beverage suppliers, apparel and textile manufacturers, real estate purchases and leases, and more -- is greater.

According to the CLIA report, the cruise industry's direct expenses in the United States amounted to about $23.9 billion, resulting in an estimated 172,326 direct jobs throughout the U.S. economy, paying $8.32 billion in wages and salaries in 2018. Included in these direct expenses are purchases of a variety of goods and services, including food and beverages, fuel, insurance and business services, among others.

 In 2018, the cruise industry was a main source of business for 78,800 U.S.-based travel agents, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics.

The economic chain continues as these businesses purchase their own goods and services from other businesses.

Passenger & Crew Spending

But cruise lines are not the only ones contributing to the economy. Travelers taking cruises are also spending money, particularly in the cities from which they depart.

In 2018, 12.7 million cruise passengers boarded ships at U.S ports, according to Statista. U.S. homeports are located on the East Coast, the West Coast and the Gulf Coast, spreading the industry's economic impact to multiple states.

Most cruisers spent money on some combination of hotel rooms, rental cars, parking, gas, food, taxis or Ubers/Lyfts, and other local goods and services. Passengers (and crew) spent $4.67 billion in the United States in 2018, according to the CLIA report.

In Florida, specifically, onshore spending by passengers and crew produced just over $1.2 billion, the CLIA report said. 

In Seattle, in a typical year, an estimated 1.2 million cruise ships passengers pass through the cruise port. Their spending (on hotels, restaurants and related goods and services) totals about $467 million annually, according to a report from the Port of Seattle.

Similarly, according to the Port of Los Angeles, 11 cruise ships passed through the Los Angeles World Cruise Center in 2018, handling about 519,000 passengers; each time a cruise ship calls there, it adds an estimated $1 million into the local economy, the port says.

Case Study: Alaska

There's also a domino effect from passenger and crew spending, particularly in areas of the U.S. that are heavily dependent on cruise visitors, like Alaska.

According to the report, "The Role of Visitors in Alaska's Economy," prepared by the McDowell Group in 2018, the economic chain works like this: Visitors and cruise companies spend money on goods, including food and beverages, souvenirs and fuel, as well as services including tours, lodging and recreational activities. The companies that provide said goods and services then spend money on restaurant supply goods, inventory for their stores, fuel, utilities, building maintenance, accounting services and publishing. Employees of all the above spend money on groceries, clothing, restaurants, medical care, real estate and recreation.

In 2017, direct visitor spending by crew members accounted for $22 million, while direct cruise line spending and payroll accounted for $297 million.

In terms of direct payments to the State of Alaska, the cruise industry paid $33.3 million in 2017, including $19.9 million from the commercial passenger vessel tax.

https://www.cruisecritic.com/articles.cfm?ID=5278&et_cid=3325808&et_rid=16703363&et_referrer=NULL

 

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Virgin Voyages Rolls Out New Health Protocols to Make Its Ships Safer

image.png.4ff0539ae846ef82850724c06ae04564.png

 

Virgin Voyages is well aware that there are a whole lot of eager travelers who are still nervous about stepping foot on a cruise ship right now. That’s why the company is implementing a strict new set of health and safety measures to help put passengers at ease.

On Thursday, Richard Branson’s nascent cruise line announced an extensive set of health protocols in a press release. Dubbed “Virgin Well,” the comprehensive program was designed in collaboration with health and science specialists with the aim of making traveling by cruise ship safer for passengers and crew as the company prepares for its maiden voyage.

Cruise lines around the world have been forced to suspend service because of the global pandemic, and Virgin Voyages was no different; it had to postpone its launch. The company’s first ship, the Scarlet Lady, was originally scheduled to set sail on its inaugural season in April. Because of the outbreak, that date was postponed until August and has now been pushed back to a “soft open” in October, assuming that travel restrictions have been lifted by then.

When the Scarlet Lady does finally leave port, it will do so with reduced ship capacity. The new boat, which has never sailed with passengers (or sailors as the company calls them) before, will be outfitted with a cutting-edge air purification system from AtmosAir Solutions, virus neutralizing air filters and thermal monitoring cameras. The boat will also make use of virtual queues instead of physical lines, while all public spaces will have fresh air. Additionally, all passengers and crew will be subject to rapid Covid-19 testing and a pre-boarding health check before boarding. Crew will also be tested regularly during their time on the boat.

“The health and wellbeing of our Sailors is our number one priority, so we rolled up our sleeves with leading experts to further innovate and create an even healthier way to travel and still have an incredible vacation,” said Virgin Voyages CEO Tom McAlpin. “We appreciate some people will be apprehensive about traveling, so we are committed to being led by science and creating ways to give people confidence to explore the world while feeling safer, more relaxed and free to enjoy themselves.”

While the entire travel industry has been disrupted by the Covid-19 outbreak, cruise lines have been hit especially hard. The CDC and US Department of State even discouraged Americans from taking cruises earlier this spring after two ships belonging to Princess Cruises experienced onboard outbreaks. Since then, numerous lines, including Norwegian Cruise Line and Royal Carribean, have suspended service indefinitely.

https://www.msn.com/en-ph/travel/news/virgin-voyages-rolls-out-new-health-protocols-to-make-its-ships-safer/ar-BB15GiDT?ocid=msedgdhp

 

 

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This an email sent to Cruise Lines International Associations (CLIA) members.

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June 19th 2020

CLIA Announces Voluntary Suspension of Cruise Operations from U.S. Ports

Dear CLIA Members and Partners,

Earlier today, the Global Board of Directors voted to voluntarily extend the suspension of U.S. cruise passenger operations until 15 September 2020 for all ships that are subject to the CDC's current No Sail Order (vessels with the capacity to carry 250 or more). We will continually evaluate the evolving situation and make a determination as to whether a further extension is necessary. 

While we know this decision will have tremendous implications for the greater cruise community—including many of you, our valued travel agents, ports, cruise suppliers and service providers travel agencies and agents, cruise suppliers and service providers—it has become clear that barriers to the resumption of U.S. cruise operations will not be resolved by 24 July, the expiration date of the current CDC No Sail Order. With that said, and given the devastating impact the suspension of cruise operations is having on U.S. jobs and the economy, we are hopeful that this extension will allow for a thoughtful and productive dialogue with the CDC regarding the future of cruise operations in the United States. 

While this is not welcome news, please know that CLIA is committed to supporting every member of our cruise community through these difficult times. As we strive towards a safe resumption of operations, we will continue to promote and share the importance of this community and the industry-wide commitment to public health and safety, which is further demonstrated by the decision to extend the suspension of U.S. operations.

Very shortly, CLIA will distribute a press release announcing the voluntary extension of the current suspension in the U.S. In the meantime, please do not hesitate to reach out should you have any questions and thank you, as always, for your continued support and commitment to the cruise community.

 

 

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SkyMan

I wonder what some of those retired permanent cruisers are doing.  The ones that don't have a real residence and just go from cruise to cruise.

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48 minutes ago, SkyMan said:

I wonder what some of those retired permanent cruisers are doing

Not a good time to go to a nursing home!

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