Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
Dafey

Doctor Dies Of Severe Dengue; 4 Others Infected

Recommended Posts

Dafey
Quote

 

MANILA, Philippines — A doctor at the Philippine Children’s Medical Center (PCMC) in Quezon City died of severe dengue on Wednesday while four other physicians were infected with the mosquito-borne virus, a report of the hospital showed.

Based on PCMC’s statement signed by hospital executive director Julius Lecciones, one of its fellows succumbed to the infection on Sept. 19.

“This month, unfortunately, we had five doctors getting ill as well from dengue, including the fellow we lost who also had a comorbidity due to diabetes mellitus,” Lecciones noted in the statement issued on Sept. 20.

The four physicians have fully recovered, even as all of them including the deceased were not inoculated with the anti-dengue vaccine Dengvaxia.

Lecciones also revealed a surge in dengue cases at PCMC since May.

As this developed, Health Secretary Francisco Duque III said in a phone interview that an outbreak of dengue at a hospital is “unacceptable” while the death of the doctor is “lamentable.”  

“I am just waiting for the report of (Lecciones). They have to find out why this happened. If the report is questionable, I will have an independent body to investigate this,” Duque said. 

To prevent a repeat of the incident, the health chief has ordered all the hospitals of the department to check if there are dengue outbreaks in the communities surrounding them.  

PCMC, for instance, is situated in a highly-populated community. 

“If there are epidemics in a community, the hospitals (should) make sure that the concerned local government units are doing dengue prevention activities so the disease will not spread,” Duque said.

But Lecciones claimed that the PCMC has been enforcing protective measures like the use of insect repellant and early consultation for any febrile episode since last month.

“We have intensified not only our early reporting system for febrile episodes among our employees but also search and destroy efforts against the mosquito vector in the hospital and our immediate outside environment,” he said.

“Heightened awareness is key, coupled with early and proactive clinical intervention as appropriate. Our heightened vigilance continues for our employees, our patients and the larger community,” Lecciones added.

 

https://www.msn.com/en-ph/news/national/doctor-dies-of-severe-dengue-4-others-infected/ar-AAAtPLz?ocid=spartandhp

  • Thanks 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
HeyMike

My neighbor's 18 month baby died from dengue 2 weeks ago. They live in Barili. The baby got a fever so they brought him to the hospital, but in 3 days he had died. Dengue is a good topic to bring up every once in a while for those new LinC members who may have just moved here and are not familiar with dengue. Usually it does not kill, but the very young and the older people are more in danger, as would be expected. 

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Headshot

Like I have said before, hospitals in the Philippines are the most dangerous places in the country. There are always Dengue patients around, and the hospitals don't do a very good job keeping mosquitoes out. It is amazing that more doctors, nurses, patients and visitors don't die. Mosquitoes ride elevators up to the Dengue wards and rooms to get a quick bite (I saw that in Chong Hua Hospital in Cebu). The next person the mosquito bites will get infected.

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Soupeod

Is Dengue more prevalent in big cities? Nm just looked it up.

 

 

IMG_2622.JPG

Edited by soupeod
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
oztony

I think I read about tests they have done in Aus. with dengue and they have developed a way of introducing something to the mozzies so that when they breed they no longer have the ability to carry Dengue ....will try and dig it out ...but it was the most promising news about Dengue ever... 

Found it ....... https://www.smithsonianmag.com/smart-news/australian-city-beats-dengue-fever-using-special-mosquitoes-180969857/

An Australian City Beats Dengue Fever Using Special Mosquitoes

There has not been a case of the disease in Townsville for four years after the release of insects carrying a naturally occurring bacteria

Globally, dengue fever is on the rise. Just last year, cases of the mosquito-borne disease reached an all-time high in Australia, infecting around 2,000 people total. But the city of Townsville in the state of Queensland hasn’t seen a single case in the last four years, despite being in the perfect habitat for the disease.

  That’s because, reports Sarah Boseley at The Guardian, the citizens of Townsville released millions of mosquitoes infected with a certain bacteria that prevents them from spreading the disease. If deployed globally, the technique could help protect the over 2 billion people living in the range of the disease.

It turns out, about 60 percent of insects on Earth carry around bacteria known as Wolbachia. Though the microbe does not normally colonize Aedes aegypti, the super-resilient and adaptable tropical mosquito species that transmits dengue fever, zika, chikungunya and other human diseases. But researchers have found a neat trick: If Wolbachia does take root in those mosquitoes, it disrupts the growth of the viruses and reduces their transmission.

In Townsville, population 187,000, researchers from Monash University and the nonprofit World Mosquito Program, attempted to do just that. Kelly Servick at Science reports that the program enlisted 7,000 families in the metro area to host a small tub of Wolbachia-infested Aedes aegypti eggs in their yard, where they fed them fish food and nursed them to maturity. Eventually, 4 million bacteria-filled mozzies—as they’re called in Australia—hatched and mixed with wild populations over 25 square miles, spreading the bacteria throughout the population during mating. The study, which has yet to be peer-reviewed, appears on Gates Open Research.

Monash medical entomologist and World Mosquito Program director Scott O’Neill tells Servick that, so far, the mosquito population in Townsville seems to be maintaining the Wolbachia. In the decade before the study, the city experienced dengue outbreaks every year. But since the release of the inoculated mosquitoes, there have been no cases reported.

That’s encouraging news, since researchers have had little success in beating mosquito-borne illnesses in recent decades. “We’re wanting to have a really major impact on disease. For dengue and Zika nothing’s working at the moment for control. There’s evidence of a growing disease burden and there was the big Zika pandemic that stripped through the Americas recently and the rest of the world,” O’Neill tells The Guardian’s Boseley. “Nothing we’ve got is slowing these diseases down – they are getting worse. I think we’ve got something here that’s going to have a significant impact and I think this study is the first indication that it’s looking very promising.”

The Townsville test is not the first trial of the Wolbachia method, but it is by far the largest test case so far. Currently, the program is doing research on the technique in 12 countries and has released the mosquitoes in six, including the favelas of Rio de Janeiro that bore the brunt of the Zika outbreak. The next major case study is in the city of Yogyakarta in Indonesia, a city of about 400,000 people, where researchers are conducting a randomized trial of the method. Those results should be ready in about 18 months.

According to a press release, the current cost of releasing the treated mosquitoes is about $15 per person. With time, the team hopes to get the cost down to about $1 per resident, which would allow the project to be rolled out in some of the poorer regions of the world where it’s needed most. Even more promising, O’Neill tells Boseley that lab tests suggest the same technology could be used to prevent malaria as well, though field trials of that are still a way’s away.

The other advantage of the Wolbachia method is that, since the bacteria is naturally occurring throughout most of the world, there is little danger of spreading a pathogen that might hurt other insect species. Other researchers are also looking at ways to stop the spread of dengue and other diseases by creating genetically modified mosquitoes resistant to carrying the virus. Another type of genetic modification causes the male offspring Aedes aegypti mosquitoes to die, eventually leading to a population crash. Wolbachia can be used to produce similar results—if only male mosquitoes are infected with the bacteria any eggs they fertilize with non-infected females will be sterile, also leading to a population crash, a technique recently tested in Florida.

The World Mosquito Program’s Wolbachia method, however, has several advantages. Genetic modification is controversial and could lead to public resistance to the release of the insects. And methods that kill off mosquito populations, though welcome by many humans, could have negative impacts on the environment. The World Mosquito Program says that their program, at least so far, is self-sustaining, has little impact on the environment and doesn’t raise red flags the way genetic modification projects can.

 

Edited by oztony
  • Like 2
  • Thanks 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
M.C.A.

I just got back today from visiting our friends who lost their 6-year-old daughter to dengue, she died Friday, it was tough for me seeing such a beautiful little girl so young lose her life, she would play with our grandkids.  :sad_01:

  • Sad 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
wondersailor
1 hour ago, oztony said:

I think I read about tests they have done in Aus. with dengue and they have developed a way of introducing something to the mozzies so that when they breed they no longer have the ability to carry Dengue ....will try and dig it out ...but it was the most promising news about Dengue ever... 

Found it ....... https://www.smithsonianmag.com/smart-news/australian-city-beats-dengue-fever-using-special-mosquitoes-180969857/

An Australian City Beats Dengue Fever Using Special Mosquitoes

There has not been a case of the disease in Townsville for four years after the release of insects carrying a naturally occurring bacteria

Globally, dengue fever is on the rise. Just last year, cases of the mosquito-borne disease reached an all-time high in Australia, infecting around 2,000 people total. But the city of Townsville in the state of Queensland hasn’t seen a single case in the last four years, despite being in the perfect habitat for the disease.

  That’s because, reports Sarah Boseley at The Guardian, the citizens of Townsville released millions of mosquitoes infected with a certain bacteria that prevents them from spreading the disease. If deployed globally, the technique could help protect the over 2 billion people living in the range of the disease.

It turns out, about 60 percent of insects on Earth carry around bacteria known as Wolbachia. Though the microbe does not normally colonize Aedes aegypti, the super-resilient and adaptable tropical mosquito species that transmits dengue fever, zika, chikungunya and other human diseases. But researchers have found a neat trick: If Wolbachia does take root in those mosquitoes, it disrupts the growth of the viruses and reduces their transmission.

In Townsville, population 187,000, researchers from Monash University and the nonprofit World Mosquito Program, attempted to do just that. Kelly Servick at Science reports that the program enlisted 7,000 families in the metro area to host a small tub of Wolbachia-infested Aedes aegypti eggs in their yard, where they fed them fish food and nursed them to maturity. Eventually, 4 million bacteria-filled mozzies—as they’re called in Australia—hatched and mixed with wild populations over 25 square miles, spreading the bacteria throughout the population during mating. The study, which has yet to be peer-reviewed, appears on Gates Open Research.

Monash medical entomologist and World Mosquito Program director Scott O’Neill tells Servick that, so far, the mosquito population in Townsville seems to be maintaining the Wolbachia. In the decade before the study, the city experienced dengue outbreaks every year. But since the release of the inoculated mosquitoes, there have been no cases reported.

That’s encouraging news, since researchers have had little success in beating mosquito-borne illnesses in recent decades. “We’re wanting to have a really major impact on disease. For dengue and Zika nothing’s working at the moment for control. There’s evidence of a growing disease burden and there was the big Zika pandemic that stripped through the Americas recently and the rest of the world,” O’Neill tells The Guardian’s Boseley. “Nothing we’ve got is slowing these diseases down – they are getting worse. I think we’ve got something here that’s going to have a significant impact and I think this study is the first indication that it’s looking very promising.”

The Townsville test is not the first trial of the Wolbachia method, but it is by far the largest test case so far. Currently, the program is doing research on the technique in 12 countries and has released the mosquitoes in six, including the favelas of Rio de Janeiro that bore the brunt of the Zika outbreak. The next major case study is in the city of Yogyakarta in Indonesia, a city of about 400,000 people, where researchers are conducting a randomized trial of the method. Those results should be ready in about 18 months.

According to a press release, the current cost of releasing the treated mosquitoes is about $15 per person. With time, the team hopes to get the cost down to about $1 per resident, which would allow the project to be rolled out in some of the poorer regions of the world where it’s needed most. Even more promising, O’Neill tells Boseley that lab tests suggest the same technology could be used to prevent malaria as well, though field trials of that are still a way’s away.

The other advantage of the Wolbachia method is that, since the bacteria is naturally occurring throughout most of the world, there is little danger of spreading a pathogen that might hurt other insect species. Other researchers are also looking at ways to stop the spread of dengue and other diseases by creating genetically modified mosquitoes resistant to carrying the virus. Another type of genetic modification causes the male offspring Aedes aegypti mosquitoes to die, eventually leading to a population crash. Wolbachia can be used to produce similar results—if only male mosquitoes are infected with the bacteria any eggs they fertilize with non-infected females will be sterile, also leading to a population crash, a technique recently tested in Florida.

The World Mosquito Program’s Wolbachia method, however, has several advantages. Genetic modification is controversial and could lead to public resistance to the release of the insects. And methods that kill off mosquito populations, though welcome by many humans, could have negative impacts on the environment. The World Mosquito Program says that their program, at least so far, is self-sustaining, has little impact on the environment and doesn’t raise red flags the way genetic modification projects can.

 

As memory serves me, they used this technique in parts of Florida with the zika scare in the US, but they added a twist. They only introduced the bacillus into the male mosquito. This made all offspring unviable. They were successful at greatly reducing the population of the mosquito which, to my mind, is infinitely more desirable. The elimination of the species of mosquito is not something that i would cry about.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Goetz1965

So whats the point ? How many die from Malaria - or get run over in traffic every day ... ?

  • Confused 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Dafey
14 minutes ago, Goetz1965 said:

So whats the point ? How many die from Malaria - or get run over in traffic every day ... ?

Just like a Typhoon, you can survive or avoid Dengue if you prepare.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
wondersailor
4 minutes ago, Goetz1965 said:

So whats the point ? How many die from Malaria - or get run over in traffic every day ... ?

According to the CDC, in 2016 approx. 445,000 worldwide. Add to that yellow fever, denge, zika and who knows what next. All by one species species of mosquito. I say get rid of it once and for all.

 

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

  • Sailfish Bay Fishing Charters

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use, Privacy Policy and Guidelines. We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue..