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PhilsFan

Powering a Voltage regulator @220v with a 110V Honda generator?

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PhilsFan

My old 110V Honda 2kw suitcase generator just arrived by BB box from the USA.

I have several Chinese made voltage regulators here in my house in Mindanao to deal with the power fluctuations we have here.

Specifically, I have Chint-brand TND1-0.5 automatic AC voltage regulators. Single phase with Rated capacity of 0.5kVA. Output rated current is 2.3A The voltage regulator has plugs to power 110V and 220V. On the back of the regulator, it states input range of 110V-250V. Near the power cord itself, it is labeled as: INPUT 1 10V-250V.  

I would like to know if I can plug these into my 110V generator during a power outage. My generator DOES NOT have 220V capability.

I would hate to damage my generator or ruin the voltage regulator. Is it really possible to plug (what I thought was) a 220V powered regulator into a 110V power source and it will run both 220V and 110V devices at the same time?  I have been under the impression that I would have to order a 110V to 220V step-up voltage regulator in order to run 220V appliances. I am not able to find any of this type here locally and would be forced to have these heavy bastards shipped from the USA. 

Much thanks to anyone here who could advise me.

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M.C.A.

I'm not an electrician so hopefully, someone will post but if your voltage regulator power input requirements are 110 - 220 V... I'd think that would work but how many watts can the voltage regulator handle they do get hot if maxed out on voltage.

So if I have this correct your voltage regulator power requirements are 110 - 220 V... So it sounds universal with options to convert up to 220 Volts, if nobody gives you answer I'd take it to an electrician shop to double check this.

Edited by M.C.A.

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PhilsFan
9 minutes ago, M.C.A. said:

I'm not an electrician so hopefully, someone will post but if your voltage regulator power input requirements are 110 - 220 V... I'd think that would work but how many watts can the voltage regulator handle they do get hot if maxed out on voltage.

So if I have this correct your voltage regulator power requirements are 110 - 220 V... So it sounds universal with options to convert up to 220 Volts, if nobody gives you answer I'd take it to an electrician shop to double check this.

Agreed. Hoping an experienced member here can give me the Go-No-GO.  I wasn't able to find any info online about the V Regs ability to use dual voltage. It appears that way, but I am hesitant. I could deal with blowing up a V Reg, but would really be pissed if I wrecked my generator because I did something stupid!.

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Jawny

I can’t answer the technical query. However, the 110v generator may be suitable for many of your electronic devices.  That is, you may have a wide variety of items which can accept lower voltage. Even some lighting systems allow for voltage ranges. I know televisions and some computers accept a range of voltage. 

I would guess that power hungry things like water pumps, refrigerators and the like would require the full, or close to, 220v. 

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PhilsFan
14 minutes ago, Jawny said:

I can’t answer the technical query. However, the 110v generator may be suitable for many of your electronic devices.  That is, you may have a wide variety of items which can accept lower voltage. Even some lighting systems allow for voltage ranges. I know televisions and some computers accept a range of voltage. 

I would guess that power hungry things like water pumps, refrigerators and the like would require the full, or close to, 220v. 

Thanks yes, aware of what items can be used TV/Computer etc. Primarily concerned with A/C, refrigerator (220V) and keeping wifi up and running in a power outage. I need to be able to work through power outs.

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Woolf

@PhilsFan

I found this, is that your unit ??

https://www.chinahao.com/product/534027363660/

it says  input 160 to 250 v

found a few other places that said 160 to 250v

if the above is your regulator will not work at 110 volt

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PhilsFan
2 minutes ago, Woolf said:

@PhilsFan

I found this, is that your unit ??

https://www.chinahao.com/product/534027363660/

it says  input 160 to 250 v

found a few other places that said 160 to 250v

if the above is your regulator will not work at 110 volt

Same brand. But the back of my unit says 110V-250V. Not a direct match.

My 110V outlet is on back panel. I have 2- 220V in front and a 220V on back in addition to the 110V outlet.

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PhilsFan

I am getting really tempted to just plug the damn thing in and see what happens, Lol. Hopefully, I have a definite answer before I just do it!

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Woolf

@PhilsFan

Your  generator has a circuit breaker ?

your regulator has a fuse or breaker ??

if yes to both   I would try  it 

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M.C.A.
17 minutes ago, PhilsFan said:

Thanks yes, aware of what items can be used TV/Computer etc. Primarily concerned with A/C, refrigerator (220V) and keeping wifi up and running in a power outage. I need to be able to work through power outs.

Found some information on your voltage regulator you said it handles 0.5 kw... So 1 kva equals 1000 volt amps, meaning volts multiplied by amps, therefore equals1000 watts. The difference between volt amps and watts is considered in circuit which has a power factor other than unity due to inductive or capacitive reactance.  

If I'm not mistaken your voltage regulator can only handle 500 watts.  I purchased a servo controlled 1,500-watt voltage regulator and it ran me nearly 3,500 pesos Omni brand

Edited by M.C.A.
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PhilsFan
Just now, Woolf said:

@PhilsFan

Your  generator has a circuit breaker ?

your regulator has a fuse or breaker ??

if yes to both   I would try  it 

I will check it. Great suggestion Woolf. Generators got one..whew!

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PhilsFan

This is my unit. I have 3 of them.

 

Image result for chint TND1-0.5 voltage regulator

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PhilsFan

It has a 3amp breaker. I should be good to go. I will try it out tomorrow.

Just now, Woolf said:

That is one of those I found, it says  input 160 to 250

http://fireflyelectric.com/product/automatic-voltage-regulator-single-phase/

Yeah, weird, Huh? ...mine definitely says 110V-250V on the back AND at the cord exit. 

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M.C.A.

PhilsFan, I have a similar unit but it's a 1000 watt but no servo and it had to be repaired it wasn't giving out the right voltages for 110 or 220 it also could have burned up my TV's, I paid 1000 pesos for it about 20 years ago but the electrician was able to regulate both 110 and 220 outputs.

If you want to run an AC unit or fridge you'd need a more powerful voltage regulator probably as high or higher than 3000 watts, depends on your fridge or AC unit power requirements.

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