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RangerUp

Cebuano v Bisaya ...exactly the same or not.......

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Headshot

Bisaya is a major language, and Cebuano is a dialect of Bisaya. It is easy to think that their is no difference because Cebuano is the most widely spoken dialect of Bisaya, but there are several other dialects in Bisaya. My wife (who has many relatives on Negros) says that those from Negros have a sing-songy way of speaking Bisaya (a different dialect), but that it is mostly understandable to her. Deep Bisaya is the language from before the Spanish (sort of like Old English is to the English language). Very few Filipinos use deep Bisaya in today's world unless they are trying to impress with their knowledge of the language.

Edited by Headshot
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RangerUp

The point that most are missing is that, confusingly, Bisaya/Visaya/Bisayan/Visayan are four words that  all mean two different things.

The first thing they mean is Cebuano, like my post and Simple Man's post confirmed, they are literally used as a synonym for Cebuano. It's like how many Filipinos broadly call all species of tuna, "tulingan" and not the individual names.

The second thing they mean is this: 30 languages, in the Visayan language family.

Quote

Native speakers of Visayan languages, especially Cebuano, Hiligaynon and Waray not only refer to their language by their local name, but also by Bisaya or Binisaya, meaning Visayan language. This is misleading or may lead to confusion as different languages may be called Bisaya by their respective speakers despite their languages being mutually unintelligible. - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Visayan_languages

 

Edited by RangerUp

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cookie47

Just a little story relating to language in Negros.

My first wife was from Escalante.

At home they spoke Cebuano.
This apparently is due to Escalante and a few surrounding kilometres face Cebu. I'm not too sure of the accual are)
The children in the morning would speak Cebuano at home, The bus conductor would speak to them in Ilongo, (Because to bus terminated in Bacolod), at school they spoke English. Then the reverse on the way home.I found this amazing.

Sent from my Redmi Note 3 using Tapatalk

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oztony
18 minutes ago, RangerUp said:

The point that most are missing is that, confusingly, Bisaya/Visaya/Bisayan/Visayan are four words that  all mean two different things.

The first thing they mean is Cebuano, like my post and Simple Man's post confirmed, they are literally used as a synonym for Cebuano. It's like how many Filipinos broadly call all species of tuna, "tulingan" and not the individual names.

The second thing they mean is this: 30 languages, in the Visayan language family.

 

 

18 minutes ago, RangerUp said:

Native speakers of Visayan languages, especially Cebuano, Hiligaynon and Waray not only refer to their language by their local name, but also by Bisaya or Binisaya, meaning Visayan language. This is misleading or may lead to confusion as different languages may be called Bisaya by their respective speakers despite their languages being mutually unintelligible. - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Visayan_languages

This whole post just confirms that there is a difference between Cebuano and Bisaya ...even on the premise that everything relates back to Bisaya .....there are different takes on it ..Where we are they call their dialect Bisaya which is very similar but some differences to Cebuano. Which means they are not exactly the same ... which was the original statement.

Trying to flog a dead horse on this ............

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oztony
7 minutes ago, cookie47 said:

Just a little story relating to language in Negros.

My first wife was from Escalante.

At home they spoke Cebuano.
This apparently is due to Escalante and a few surrounding kilometres face Cebu. I'm not too sure of the accual are)
The children in the morning would speak Cebuano at home, The bus conductor would speak to them in Ilongo, (Because to bus terminated in Bacolod), at school they spoke English. Then the reverse on the way home.I found this amazing.

Sent from my Redmi Note 3 using Tapatalk
 

It gets funnier ...when they are at home "sabot" ...means understand ....and when they get off the bus in Bacolod ....it means pubic hair ...tinuod estorya (true story) ...:D  

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RangerUp
12 minutes ago, oztony said:

they are not exactly the same ..

When used in the second definition.

Not when used in the first definition (which, again, is literally synonymic).

 

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cookie47
It gets funnier ...when they are at home "sabot" ...means understand ....and when they get off the bus in Bacolod ....it means pubic hair ...tinuod estorya (true story) ...  
Absolutely, my Sister in law who was an absolute hoot of a lady was very naughty (for a filipina) and tried to catch me out at times......


Sent from my Redmi Note 3 using Tapatalk

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