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Why is it that no ones using Clay Bricks to make houses?


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sunnybanana1913

I just realized that all the houses ive seen in Philippines are made with thr concrete hollow blocks. Im sure its cheaper but is it even possible to buy clay brcks anywhere?

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I've seen only one size red brick sold where we live..Used them for my pizza oven dome build.. Not cheap though!

Why they don`t use them here within the ring of fire?
Not 100% sure but I definitely wouldn't want to live under a house made of  them after experiencing the last earthquake we had here.. 

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brick-2205882_1280-730x410.jpg

 

Edited by fred42
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Ozepete
5 hours ago, sunnybanana1913 said:

I just realized that all the houses ive seen in Philippines are made with thr concrete hollow blocks. Im sure its cheaper but is it even possible to buy clay brcks anywhere?

Jeeez mate, they cant lay concrete blocks properly so how bigger a mess do you think they would get into laying bricks!  :shitbricks:

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6 minutes ago, Ozepete said:

Jeeez mate, they cant lay concrete blocks properly so how bigger a mess do you think they would get into laying bricks!  :shitbricks:



Why would they need to lay them neatly and properly only to render all those lovely courses and beautiful pointing with an inch of cement render?

Edited by fred42
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Actually, they are quite capable once taught. A friend of mine in the mountains back of Cebu built a huge English country house style property with specially ordered brick facia. The place looks fantastic and the craftsmanship involved was on par with anything available back home.

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Dafey

I always thought it was for the lack of clay. I've never seen clay soil here, only sandstone and rock.

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to_dave007
7 minutes ago, Dafey said:

I always thought it was for the lack of clay. I've never seen clay soil here, only sandstone and rock.

and the abundance of limestone..  key ingredient for cement.

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Definitely clay here..

DENR bares huge clay deposits in Bulacan

Read more at https://www.philstar.com/nation/2003/06/05/208895/denr-bares-huge-clay-deposits-bulacan#FB15Voo0heb3gskJ.99
 

What do you do with 60 million metric tons of clay? 

A lot of streets, sidewalks and other infrastructure projects, the Department of Environment and Natural Resources (DENR) said. 

It’s not child’s play: the DENR, which recently found 60 million metric tons of possible clay reserve in San Ildefonso, Angat and San Rafael-Bustos in Bulacan, revealed that such huge deposits can help the government in its infrastructure and beautification projects as well as provide jobs for thousands of Filipinos. 

Clay, the DENR said, is one of the raw materials in producing bricks — particularly red bricks — that are commonly used in paving sidewalks. 

The dough-like soil, it added, can be also used for interlocking bricks before they are cemented over. 

Environment and Natural Resources Secretary Elisea Gozun said the clay reserve in Bulacan consists of 0.90 million metric tons (MT) of feldspathic clay, 10 million MT of semi-plastic kaolinitic clay, and 50 million MT of plastic mottled and red clay. 

Based on DENR studies, light-colored feldspathic clay is also used in making porcelain and sanitary wares. 

The dark-colored kaolinitic clay, on the other hand, is utilized in stoneware, terra cotta and face bricks production. 

Gozun said she has recommended the use of clay to the Metro Manila Development Authority (MMDA) for its ongoing beautification projects. 

Horacio Ramos, director of the DENR’s Mines and Geosciences Bureau (MGB), for his part, said the clay mining in Bulacan could be included as one of the livelihood programs in Region 3 (Central Luzon). 

The bureau, he said, is willing to extend its expertise in the evaluation of potential clay sources to prospective investors. 

It conducts geological evaluation, sampling and laboratory analysis to determine the physical and chemical attributes of clay deposits.
Read more at https://www.philstar.com/nation/2003/06/05/208895/denr-bares-huge-clay-deposits-bulacan#lFsHveVUF89So935.99




https://www.olx.ph/item/clay-bricks-ID8cvda.html?h=fd6cf12391

_1_.jpg

Edited by fred42
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shadow

Plenty of clay in this area. There is a large Barangay in Dumaguete named "Claytown", where there is a large variety of clay products made and sold.  Valencia has paved all their sidewalks in the plaza area with clay brick.

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JamesMusslewhite

   Cost... brick is labor intensive and usually needs to be transported great distances from where they are rendered. Being stacked on pallets requires loading and offloading with heavy forklifts. Then once delivered requires workers skilled in masonry. It could be more practical in locations near major road systems but not on small islands and more rural and isolated locations. I want to build a medium size dual-sided fire brick oven to bake breads and pizzas on one side and a rotisserie for large meats and fowl on the other. 

  It would probably cost me the price of a new 155cc motorcycle just in the delivery cost to deliver the single pallet of clay bricks from Cebu, not including the cost of the bricks. Needless to say that little project might be on hold for quite a while. I am looking for a quality clay on Dinaget Island where our farm is located, and the clay is available then have the clay delivered via dump-truck to the farm where I can then fabricate the bricks myself. Then I can transport the bricks with my boat as where I am presently staying is only an hour away from the farm. Then I can easily build two such ovens, one larger unit on the farm and a smaller unit here on this little island.

   This type of oven project of course wound only require the use of sun-dried (adobo) bricks made from a simple mixture of clay, sand and both rice-straw and caramelized rice-straw ash formed in wooden molds and left to cure in the sun. Very low-tech and certainly not the higher quality fired brick needed for home construction. But cured adobo bricks could certainly be used for ovens, fire-pits, walkways, patio surfaces or small retaining walls in landscapes. 

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SkyMan
4 hours ago, fred42 said:

I've seen only one size red brick sold where we live..Used them for my pizza oven dome build.. Not cheap though!

Why they don`t use them here within the ring of fire?
Not 100% sure but I definitely wouldn't want to live under a house made of  them after experiencing the last earthquake we had here.. 

4769243.jpg

brick-2205882_1280-730x410.jpg

 

No rebar?

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RogerDat

Bricks need to be fired to be used in house construction. I worked a few months hauling bricks up stares in S.C. and never saw rebar used with bricks, as they are a cover today, not like in old days where the foot thick wall was all brick. They used sheet metal strips to tie the courses to the inner layer, be it wood, or hollow blocks.

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Oven fired clay brick was the standard of construction here in Thailand until recently.  But they were not used for support - construction was always with cement/rebar support columns with the brick with cement rendering between them.  All walls could be removed and house would still stand.  These days aerated brick is used for most home construction and offers good insulation as well as easy construction.  

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8 hours ago, SkyMan said:

No rebar?

 

Where would the re rebar go?? No holes in them diba??

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