Jump to content

Cost Range 90 SQM Roof


Recommended Posts

JohnSurrey

Just wondering how much it will cost to cover an area of 90 sqm...

Options

  1. Coco lumber and thin GI
  2. Good lumber and medium GI
  3. Steel Frame and medium GI
  4. Steel Frame and something like Coloroof - prepainted

Thanks

Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, JohnSurrey said:

Just wondering how much it will cost to cover an area of 90 sqm...

Options

  1. Coco lumber and thin GI
  2. Good lumber and medium GI
  3. Steel Frame and medium GI
  4. Steel Frame and something like Coloroof - prepainted

Thanks

2.5-3m   no. 3 or 4 

  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
BossHog

Go the proper wood and thick tin. Aged coco-lumber treated properly can be okay though. Use Solignum  on any roofing timber. 90 sqm roof, I'd budget about 30,000 or so. Maybe 50k with labor and such.

What are your options for "good lumber"?

  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
to_dave007
21 minutes ago, BossHog said:

Use Solignum  on any roofing timber.

Agree.  It'll keep the insects out of the wood.

  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

I don’t have a cost estimate for you. However, it is usually pretty simple to get a rough estimate from a builder (NOT contractor). The builder will be able to estimate the amount of wood, nails, vulcaseal for roofing nails, solignum, roof metal etc.  You didn’t mention gutters and downspouts, but this should be included. 

I’ve given up on wood framed roofs and now will only go with metal and repainted roofing.  

  • Like 3
  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
JohnSurrey
18 hours ago, BossHog said:

Go the proper wood and thick tin. Aged coco-lumber treated properly can be okay though. Use Solignum  on any roofing timber. 90 sqm roof, I'd budget about 30,000 or so. Maybe 50k with labor and such.

What are your options for "good lumber"?

Gemelina seems to be popular here

Link to post
Share on other sites
trthebees

Our first roof, about 70 sqm, was (still is!) coco lumber frame with nipa. 

The points I would make about this are that it was decently pitched at about 35 degrees. It has been recovered once after about 11 years and is still good. And my wife found coco lumber that was really aged and hard. Almost all the construction nails had to have predrilled holes, yes that hard. And we still gave it a dose of solignum for good measure. The cross battens to which the nipa is tied is a wood i don't know the name of. But the technique with it was to use the outer 2 inches which was really hard and discard the core. maybe someone knows the name. 

Our second roof, about 80 sqm on plan view, is galv sheets on a steel frame.We used green colorsteel ordcorr, 0.60 mm thick. That's the usual thick gauge, though they list a 0.75 but it's longer delivery. We included gutters and end flashings and soffit boards, and they estimated and included rivets and sealants etc. The cost was approximately 100k pesos plus 8K for delivery. Although it sounds counter-intuitive, the ordcor was slightly more expensive than the "more modern" looking supreme, but the traditional looking ordcorr suited the appearance of our house. It's also slightly stronger if trodden on.

Our carpenter was a careful skilled chap, and had a starting go at the end flashings which involved cutting angles. But soon agreed and was quite relieved when we discussed it and mutually decided to get colorsteel to install it. They did a great job for, IIRC, about 20K.

The trusses are A frame at 1.7m centres. 32 degrees. Although intended to span 8M, it happens they are also supported on an wall running down the centre of the house.There's 5, though the end ones are partially supported by the blockwork. Purlins are 80mm, usual thin stuff, at 600mm centres. There's the usual frame extensions to the sides and purlin extensions at the ends to carry the roof overhangs. Maybe your 90 sqm includes overhangs.

I deliberately stuck to 600mm purlin centres cos that's what they recommend and if you do get a company to install it's more comfortable to have used their recommended spacing. The local purlins are a bit thin too! If you look up spacings, Oz sites have a fair bit of info, the spacing are larger, maybe better purlin material.

We actually used purlins, turned sideways, to carry our ceiling. They were levelled screwed, rivetted etc to angle bars welded across the roof trusses by our carpenters

Truss and purlin costs are slightly more vague because we bought the material locally in numerous stages as the work progressed. But I would say about 50K. Plus I reckon about 15 to 20K on really tons of primer paint and welding rods and sundries. Plus maybe 5K on scaffold type coco lumber. Labour a bit difficult as it was a mix of DIY welding, a local welder for a bit, and our carpenters, but I'd reckon something like 60 to 70K including the ceiling purlins. This includes time knocking up scaffold and our labourers enjoying themselves clambering about painting at every opportunity. Great chaps!

 

 

 

 

 

 

  • Thanks 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

We went with all metal roof, insulated, with hardflex eves and front. I think the new roof is about 110 sq m. The cost was about 50 to 60 thousand P. About half of the old roof sheets were reused...

 

Before.JPG

After.jpg

Edited by bkb1
  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

If you should decide to go for a well made and installed roof, I can send by PM a contact who installs preprinted roofs. Not a contractor, as he does the installation himself with a crew.  We spent around ₽400,000 to have three buildings completed, some with roof, some gutters only.  A lot more than 90sm, so don’t let the price scare you off.

The guy will come and do a complete estimate, down to the number of sealant tubes to use. He sticks to his estimate, and uses high quality materials from Cebu. 

  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use, Privacy Policy and Guidelines. We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue..