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Fiberglass Insulation


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Dafey

Does anyone have a source for attic Insulation in the Phils?

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cookie47

No expertise in this area (although I do know what it is)

Certainly some offerings on OLX

Sent from my Redmi Note 3 using Tapatalk

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Davaoeno

Rice hulls.  Fireproof, insect proof   Im not sure of the R value . Very cheap to buy

 

I have used foam backed with aluminum that I bought at Wilcon

 

I have not seen anyone use fibreglass batts in this country

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Dafey
2 hours ago, Davaoeno said:

Rice hulls.  Fireproof, insect proof   Im not sure of the R value . Very cheap to buy

Sometimes I don't know when you're joking...Is that for real? 

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Davaoeno

yes . 

Google is your friend :  66,000 results

https://www.google.com.ph/search?q=rice+hulls+insulation&oq=rice+hulls+ins&aqs=chrome.1.69i57j0l5.7938j0j7&sourceid=chrome&ie=UTF-8

 

 

Rice hulls

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
 
 
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220px-Rice_chaffs.jpg
 
Rice husk

Rice hulls (or rice husks) are the hard protecting coverings of grains of rice. In addition to protecting rice during the growing season, rice hulls can be put to use as building material, fertilizer, insulation material, or fuel.

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Davaoeno

I see its R3

Design - Rice Hull Insulation

 
Why Rice Hull Insulation?
The short answer is economy.  The rice mills have a hard time disposing of the hulls so they are only too happy to sell them by the truckload cheaply.  In fact, the cost of the hulls is
Rice%2Bhulls.jpg
insignificant compared to trucking costs from the Mississippi delta (Missouri boot-heel, Arkansas, Mississippi or Louisiana) to our St Louis area.  But there are many other advantages of rice hulls over conventional insulation which are covered in this longer-than-usual post.

(From a sustainability perspective, cellulose is the best choice among low-cost conventional insulating materials.  Therefore, it is the one most used in the following paragraphs for comparison to rice hulls.)
 
Rice Hull Properties
My serendipitous discovery of rice hulls is explained in a previous post --  design evolution - insulation.  My new awareness then lead to the definitive paper on the rice hulls for insulation by Paul Olivier, PhD, "The Rice Hull House".  The information below comes entirely from his paper including the following quote from the opening abstract. 
 
"The rice hulls are unique within nature.  They contain approximately 20% opaline silica in combination with a large amount of the phenyl propanoid structural polymer called 
Closeup%2Bof%2Brice%2Bhulls.jpg
lignin......Recent ASTM testing.....reveals that rice hulls do not flame or smolder very easily, they are highly resistant to moisture penetration and fungal decomposition, they do not transfer heat very well, they do not smell or emit gases, and they are not corrosive with respect to aluminum, copper or steel.  In their raw and unprocessed state, rice hulls constitute a Class A or Class I insulation material, and therefore, they can be used very economically to insulate the wall, floor and roof cavities....."
 
Olivier's paper goes on to explain in detail why rice hulls are ideal for insulation. Their R-value compares favorably with cellulose and loose fiberglass at a value greater than R-3 per inch. Their natural fire resistance precludes the addition of large quantities of flame and smolder retardants as with cellulose.  Nor is the addition of anti-fungal agents necessary since the amount of moisture absorbed from the air is very low compared to most organic materials that moisturize in equilibrium with the surrounding humidity.  The high concentration of opaline silica on the outer surface of the hulls makes them very hard but, lignin within the hulls adds flexibility and elasticity, making them far more resistant to settling and compression than cellulose. Also their "tiny tips, edges and hairs interlock........( to produce a) peculiar bonding of rice hulls under mild pressure......(such that) no further settling is possible". According to Olivier, cellulose, can settle "as much as 25%" despite stabilizing additives such as (un-green) polyvinyl acetate or acrylic adhesive.  Finally, "since rice hulls require no shredding, hammer-milling, fluffing, fiberizing, binding or stabilizing, they possess far less embodied energy than even cellulose".  And they are durable enough to be recycled indefinitely.

Design - Rice Hull Insulation

 
Why Rice Hull Insulation?
The short answer is economy.  The rice mills have a hard time disposing of the hulls so they are only too happy to sell them by the truckload cheaply.  In fact, the cost of the hulls is
Rice%2Bhulls.jpg
insignificant compared to trucking costs from the Mississippi delta (Missouri boot-heel, Arkansas, Mississippi or Louisiana) to our St Louis area.  But there are many other advantages of rice hulls over conventional insulation which are covered in this longer-than-usual post.

(From a sustainability perspective, cellulose is the best choice among low-cost conventional insulating materials.  Therefore, it is the one most used in the following paragraphs for comparison to rice hulls.)
 
Rice Hull Properties
My serendipitous discovery of rice hulls is explained in a previous post --  design evolution - insulation.  My new awareness then lead to the definitive paper on the rice hulls for insulation by Paul Olivier, PhD, "The Rice Hull House".  The information below comes entirely from his paper including the following quote from the opening abstract. 
 
"The rice hulls are unique within nature.  They contain approximately 20% opaline silica in combination with a large amount of the phenyl propanoid structural polymer called 
Closeup%2Bof%2Brice%2Bhulls.jpg
lignin......Recent ASTM testing.....reveals that rice hulls do not flame or smolder very easily, they are highly resistant to moisture penetration and fungal decomposition, they do not transfer heat very well, they do not smell or emit gases, and they are not corrosive with respect to aluminum, copper or steel.  In their raw and unprocessed state, rice hulls constitute a Class A or Class I insulation material, and therefore, they can be used very economically to insulate the wall, floor and roof cavities....."
 
Olivier's paper goes on to explain in detail why rice hulls are ideal for insulation. Their R-value compares favorably with cellulose and loose fiberglass at a value greater than R-3 per inch. Their natural fire resistance precludes the addition of large quantities of flame and smolder retardants as with cellulose.  Nor is the addition of anti-fungal agents necessary since the amount of moisture absorbed from the air is very low compared to most organic materials that moisturize in equilibrium with the surrounding humidity.  The high concentration of opaline silica on the outer surface of the hulls makes them very hard but, lignin within the hulls adds flexibility and elasticity, making them far more resistant to settling and compression than cellulose. Also their "tiny tips, edges and hairs interlock........( to produce a) peculiar bonding of rice hulls under mild pressure......(such that) no further settling is possible". According to Olivier, cellulose, can settle "as much as 25%" despite stabilizing additives such as (un-green) polyvinyl acetate or acrylic adhesive.  Finally, "since rice hulls require no shredding, hammer-milling, fluffing, fiberizing, binding or stabilizing, they possess far less embodied energy than even cellulose".  And they are durable enough to be recycled indefinitely.
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Dafey

Neat!

Think I'm sticking with fiberglass though. I can get it from Alibaba, (chinese), and order it to thickness but would prefer to deal with a Philippine company if possible.

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2 hours ago, Dafey said:

Neat!

Think I'm sticking with fiberglass though. I can get it from Alibaba, (chinese), and order it to thickness but would prefer to deal with a Philippine company if possible.

Looks like you can get it from PH

https://www.olx.ph/all-results?q=FIBERGLASS+INSULATION

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Our place has 4'' thick fibre glass with double metal sides. I have asked my wife to speak to her dad about where that came from, might even get around to asking why!!

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RogerDat

I used styrapore insulation from Mandaue near UN Av. If interested , will confirm their number and post.

it is fire resistant, and will not support combustion.

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Enuff

S.A. Styropor Inc

Plaridel St., Alang-Alang

Mandaue City, Cebu 6014

 

OFFICE HOURS:

8:00 am to 5:00 pm

Monday to Saturday

 

SALES & INQUIRIES

+63 (32) 3462303

+63 (32) 4203738

+63 (32) 3446377

+63 (32) 5209552

 

Sent from my CPH1819 using Tapatalk

 

 

 

 

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Dafey
6 hours ago, RogerDat said:

I used styrapore insulation from Mandaue near UN Av. If interested , will confirm their number and post.

it is fire resistant, and will not support combustion.

So they have a website and a products button but I didn't find insulation. Are you using their 'Styro-balls' product?

http://www.sastyropor.com/

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RogerDat

I used the 4'x8'x2", and 4'x8'x4" rigid sheets. they are placed on the attic floor, with a suspended radiant barrier.

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