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Mosquitoes - How Much of a Threat Are They?

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Having had Dengue Fever, I can tell you that becoming infected can mean the difference between living a long, happy life here in the Philippines ... or not. Dengue can cause literally dozens of outcomes ... and ALL of them are bad. Then again, Dengue Fever is only one of many diseases carried by mosquitoes here in the Philippines. None of them are harmless, and many of them are potentially deadly.

 

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BTW, where is the most dangerous place in the Philippines? It turns out that it is in the Dengue ward of your local hospital (or any ward or room that has Dengue Fever patients in it). Hospitals here do NOT have a good track record for eliminating mosquitoes on their own properties, so you will likely see them flying around inside the hospitals. I once saw mosquitoes flying around inside an elevator at Chong Hua Hospital when we were going to visit a friend who had Dengue Fever. Since mosquitoes have to first bite somebody who already has the disease before they can pass it on, the Dengue ward provides a ready supply of infected blood for them.

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wondersailor

The species needs to eradicated, serves not useful function. Join the dodo bird. Bye 

 

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Ozepete

When we were kids the old man made us tip some diesel fuel on any stagnant water to stop the lave from breathing and therefore reduce the mosquito population.  They said the film of diesel floating on the water was the key. 

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Bama

DDT did a very good job of eradicating mosquitoes---the most effective pesticide probably in world history.Public outcry led to it being banned in the US in the 70's. Later research suggested that the negative impact of DDT use was based on a lot of junk science.Millions of lives were saved before DDT was banned. Read the info at the link below for more info.

 

 

https://21sci-tech.com/articles/summ02/DDT.html

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Davaoeno
13 minutes ago, Bama said:

DDT did a very good job of eradicating mosquitoes---the most effective pesticide probably in world history.Public outcry led to it being banned in the US in the 70's. Later research suggested that the negative impact of DDT use was based on a lot of junk science.Millions of lives were saved before DDT was banned. Read the info at the link below for more info.

 

 

https://21sci-tech.com/articles/summ02/DDT.html

Here is some  2017 finding .  https://www.epa.gov/ingredients-used-pesticide-products/ddt-brief-history-and-status

 

and as far as malaria and mosquitoes are concerned:

Current Status

Since 1996, EPA has been participating in international negotiations to control the use of DDT and other persistent organic pollutants used around the world. Under the auspices of the United Nations Environment Programme, countries joined together and negotiated a treaty to enact global bans or restrictions on persistent organic pollutants (POPs), a group that includes DDT. This treaty is known as the Stockholm Convention on POPs. The Convention includes a limited exemption for the use of DDT to control mosquitoes that transmit the microbe that causes malaria - a disease that still kills millions of people worldwide. 

 

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lamoe
17 minutes ago, Bama said:

DDT did a very good job of eradicating mosquitoes---the most effective pesticide probably in world history.Public outcry led to it being banned in the US in the 70's. Later research suggested that the negative impact of DDT use was based on a lot of junk science.Millions of lives were saved before DDT was banned. Read the info at the link below for more info.

 

 

https://21sci-tech.com/articles/summ02/DDT.html

Read long time ago the dose feed to mice, used but hidden, as  being equivalent to a human eating 100 Ponds of DDT.

Same as force feeding mice ANYTHING from Tofu to cheese

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Bama

There is always the other side of the coin isn't there??

Do the risks of DDT's use outweigh the millions of people lives that have been lost since its banning ? Tough call unless you or your family gets malaria/dengue.

You guys help me remember.

In the states wasn't the thickness of duck shell eggs (it was claimed that they were becoming thinner) that was the vanguard of DDT being banned.If so that seems pretty subjective to me.

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Davaoeno
4 minutes ago, Bama said:

Do the risks of DDT's use outweigh the millions of people lives that have been lost since its banning ? Tough call unless you or your family gets malaria/dengue.

I'm having trouble with that statement since  ithe article says that the Stockholm Convention allows an exemption for ddt  to be used against  malaria mosquitos .

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lamoe
14 minutes ago, Davaoeno said:

I'm having trouble with that statement since  ithe article says that the Stockholm Convention allows an exemption for ddt  to be used against  malaria mosquitos .

They know all mosquitoes look alike to humans so is never used.

For the UN to allow it's use even in limited applications shows how critical the situation is and that the "science" was very suspect?

 

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Bama

Recently I say a documentary where DDT was being illegally smuggled into India to help fight off malaria.Indian officials were actively looking for the pesticide with the same fervor as shabu in this country.

No one remember the thinning eggshell debacle concerning DDT ? Perhaps I'm mistaken.

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Bama
30 minutes ago, Davaoeno said:

I'm having trouble with that statement since  ithe article says that the Stockholm Convention allows an exemption for ddt  to be used against  malaria mosquitos .

The exemption that I noted in the article for DDT usage was for indoor environments. Most mosquitoes are outdoors I'm pretty sure.

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