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Millennials in the Workforce, A Generation of Weakness


Salty Dog

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DeedleNuts

Each progressive generation has it easier than the last excepting a few brief bumps. With any luck we can continue this trend. People who try to enter the workforce at the moment of a recession or whatever are going to experience a little rougher ride right at that moment, for example, but that's short term and probably good for the soul. 

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Let me share a story about hiring, interviewing, and training millennials.  Every 6 months our company puts an ad on Craigslist for new employees "Hiring new dispatchers: Starting at $16/hou

I wouldn't have submitted a picture either. My race or what I look like has absolutely nothing to do with how I perform my duties. If a company doesn't want to hire me because I refuse to disclose my

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lamoe
On 7/2/2018 at 5:17 PM, max111 said:

There's been a boom population wise, jobs are just not available to all creating desparate youth. The youth that have jobs though are probably smarter than most of us. We are not as well educated.  P E R I O D ...    OLD DOGS!

I will concede that their I.Q. is improving but standard test scores are falling in US - interesting conundrum.

Has math(s) , English, history, geography, P.E. , music, art, shop (if even offered) , classes changed from what they taught before?

So what makes them better smarter? Attending college? That makes them better educated not smarter.

Being educated means inquiring knowledge being smart is the ability to apply that knowledge.

I contend they are not smarter. In fact probably, as a whole,  even less aware of the common principles that every day life revolves around then previous generations. 

Better at spacial relationships, sequence recognition, abstract pattern analysis - yes, changing a light bulb or contending with routine problems - no.

They are much more in tune on how to manipulate and use technical devices but lack a basic understand of the principles that make those devices function.

BTW, I programed my own VCR.

 

 

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savarity

Being educated means exposure to the specific concepts within a certain field. It's a type of experience.

As long as the college graduate didn't pick a nonsense major, then they can be a better fit for certain jobs than a 'smart' uneducated person.

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lamoe
11 minutes ago, savarity said:

Being educated means exposure to the specific concepts within a certain field. It's a type of experience.

As long as the college graduate didn't pick a nonsense major, then they can be a better fit for certain jobs than a 'smart' uneducated person.

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Of course.

I could never be a true Electrical Engineer, but I did have several report to me when I was the manager of the electrical design department for divisions of Heller Machine Tools GMBH and Barber Greene.

Admit was over 30 years ago - different times.

http://www.worldexpertise.com/Declining_Interest_in_Engineering_Studies_at_a_Time_of_Increased_Business_Needs.htm

Those taking engineering courses are increasing FINALLY.

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DeedleNuts

IQ is a relative value by definition, not an absolute 'score'.

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lamoe
2 hours ago, DeedleNuts said:

IQ is a relative value by definition, not an absolute 'score'.

Correct

In one article I read it's adjusted to achieve a mean of 100

So is if 40 correct answers out of 100 is the average  that's equal to an I.Q. of 100, same as if it's 80.

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cookie47
I wouldn't have submitted a picture either. My race or what I look like has absolutely nothing to do with how I perform my duties. If a company doesn't want to hire me because I refuse to disclose my race or allow them to judge me by how I look then it's probably best that I'm in the "out" category. (I get showing up to an interview and work looking professional, but requiring a photo with an application...makes me very suspicious that it is just another way to discriminate). And smiling at a dispatch job? As in, most work is done over the radio or phone? When not dealing with customers I see no point in faking emotions. I would never need or ask my coworkers, employees or employers to pretend to be my friend while working or act like they are truly enjoying themselves when they aren't. We are there to do a job, not make each other feel all warm and fuzzy. I don't want to work for sensitive snowflake employers that value physical appearance, race quotas and warm and fuzzy feeling over raw talent and getting the job done.
Well said,
there are strict laws in Australia pertaining to Race, Colour, creed, religion, sexual orientation, and probably more in regards to job applications. There are a few legislated positions for example,
bathroom cleaners that need to be of the right sex.
Even at the interview stage you are not allowed to ask personnel questions that do not relate to the job being applied for. However after the interview is over and the person has been hired you then can ask, Married, Children, Is travel distance a problem, etc etc.....




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28 minutes ago, cookie47 said:

Well said,
there are strict laws in Australia pertaining to Race, Colour, creed, religion, sexual orientation, and probably more in regards to job applications. There are a few legislated positions for example,
bathroom cleaners that need to be of the right sex.
Even at the interview stage you are not allowed to ask personnel questions that do not relate to the job being applied for. However after the interview is over and the person has been hired you then can ask, Married, Children, Is travel distance a problem, etc etc.....
 

There's plenty of ways companies get around the laws in AU if they want to. They will find fault somewhere else in your application or resume - not much you can do to argue the point. My EX was in workforce management in a government hospital - I heard all the tricks/reasons used.

Ageism is also rife - you can get 2 or 3 newstarters for the price of one senior exec in most industries. And just like the typing pool of primates that might happen upon a Shakespeare classic - it's hit and miss.

This article yesterday was an example of one guy trying to get back at IBM for age-ism - good luck on that one ?

https://www.news.com.au/finance/work/at-work/ibm-worker-sacked-for-not-being-a-hip-millennial/news-story/5e1ff8e93621497fefded32d15f69cc5

The recommendation is NOT to have your age on your resume - so they can't throw your application in the don't-bother pile based on that criteria if it is not relevant to the role.

55 yo's applying for Hooters waitressing ...... well ... there's exceptions ?

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cookie47
There's plenty of ways companies get around the laws in AU if they want to. They will find fault somewhere else in your application or resume - not much you can do to argue the point. My EX was in workforce management in a government hospital - I heard all the tricks/reasons used.
Ageism is also rife - you can get 2 or 3 newstarters for the price of one senior exec in most industries. And just like the typing pool of primates that might happen upon a Shakespeare classic - it's hit and miss.
This article yesterday was an example of one guy trying to get back at IBM for age-ism - good luck on that one 
https://www.news.com.au/finance/work/at-work/ibm-worker-sacked-for-not-being-a-hip-millennial/news-story/5e1ff8e93621497fefded32d15f69cc5
The recommendation is NOT to have your age on your resume - so they can't throw your application in the don't-bother pile based on that criteria if it is not relevant to the role.
55 yo's applying for Hooters waitressing ...... well ... there's exceptions ?
Yes very true, I suppose i was just pointing out that the legislation does exist, but as we both know it can be circumvented. It did appear to presume that i thought the system was perfect but its not as you rightly point out.

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A_Simple_Man

After watching that video, and reading this thread, I am convinced that the person who produced that video has their generations mixed up:

Quote

According to Forbes (2015), the generation after Millennials, Generation Z, which they defined as people born from the mid-1990s to the early 2000s, made up 25% of the U.S. population, making them a larger cohort than the Baby Boomers or Millennials.

The "Millenials" pictured in the video appear to be 20ish.  That makes them Generation Z according to this definition.  So Millenials are getting an unfair portrayal here. ?  Still, the way some Millenials protest so much, you could believe the generalization has hit a nerve. ?

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savarity

The exact age range isn't a hard science. Recently, Pew Research decided on those 22-37 years old as of 2018, for marketing research reasons, but other groups and authors, including those who coined the term 'millennial,' disagree.

Ranges previously suggested have been anywhere between 1978-2005.

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lamoe
26 minutes ago, A_Simple_Man said:

After watching that video, and reading this thread, I am convinced that the person who produced that video has their generations mixed up:

The "Millenials" pictured in the video appear to be 20ish.  That makes them Generation Z according to this definition.  So Millenials are getting an unfair portrayal here. ?  Still, the way some Millenials protest so much, you could believe the generalization has hit a nerve. ?

 

The 20 year span is the simplest

1945 / 1964 - Boomer

1965 / 1984  - Gen X

1985 / 2004 - Millennial

2005 -  2024 -  Gen Z

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A_Simple_Man
12 minutes ago, lamoe said:

The 20 year span is the simplest

I cannot find anyone else with that definition.  It may be simple but is it correct?  Here is what I find in a search

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The Silent Generation: Born 1928-1945 (73-90 years old) Baby Boomers: Born 1946-1964 (54-72 years old) Generation X: Born 1965-1980 (38-53 years old) Millennials: Born 1981-1996 (22-37 years old)

So the Gen Z is 1996 until just now and no sites I can find show what comes next. 

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lamoe

https://www.theatlantic.com/national/archive/2014/03/here-is-when-each-generation-begins-and-ends-according-to-facts/359589/

Generation X. George Masnick, of the Harvard Joint Center for Housing Studies puts this generation in the timeframe of 1965 to 1984, in part because it's a neat 20-year period. He also calls it the "baby bust," mocking "[p]undits on Madison Avenue and in the media" that call it Generation X. Ha ha, tough luck.

Millennials. In October 2004, researchers Neil Howe and William Strauss called Millennials "the next great generation," which is funny. They define the group as "as those born in 1982 and approximately the 20 years thereafter." In 2012, they affixed the end point as 2004.

CleAR as mud

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