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Drainage Problems...


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JohnSurrey

I've been looking drainage problems and solutions recently....

 

1st Problem

The ONLY solution from my Filipino builder (and knowledgeable relatives) appears to be the "Channel Drain"  - Concrete sides and bottom covered with concrete slabs with handle holes for easy removal and maintenance.

I know the Channel Drain is used in the UK but it tends to be for car parking areas or areas covered in concrete etc.

I like the French Drain approach - plastic pipe wrapped in fabric buried in gravel - covered with catch drains along the way to pick up the excess surface water - presumably cheaper and easier to install and test it is working... than a concrete channel that may work or may not - I see a lot of concrete channel drains here with stagnant water lying in them and I suspect mine will be no different if I opt for that approach.

Further I really don't fancy 30 meters of concrete drain running down the middle of our property...

2nd Problem

Appears to be a bit political...

I would like to drain out to the front of our property where there is a nice pitch and the water clears easily.

However, I'm basically being told that I should avoid draining out the front because that is where the Chapel is - it's about 10 meters away from where we would drain and our neighbour (Tio... who owns the land) drains out that way.

So I've now got the builder telling me that instead of draining to the front I should build up our land at the front to create the required gradient to drain to the back... 

I'm no builder but I do know rule no 1 about drainage is always drain away from your house - not past it to get to a field out the back!

 

Others have similar experience ?

 

sidewalk_sewer.thumb.jpg.c24649b032a57692913fc21725f662df.jpg

This is the sort of thing but on a much smaller scale - ours would be approx 12 inch wide.

Edited by JohnSurrey
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govoner

The most efficient drain is an open one as easy to clean.if the water you are draining is seepage and not like a creek I would go the plastic pipe way covered with Scoria right to the top.   You may not have to build your land up as u could dig the drain deeper to give you fall towards the back of your property.

 

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trthebees
10 hours ago, JohnSurrey said:

I like the French Drain approach - plastic pipe wrapped in fabric buried in gravel - covered with catch drains along the way to pick up the excess surface water - presumably cheaper and easier to install and test it is working... than a concrete channel that may work or may not - I see a lot of concrete channel drains here with stagnant water lying in them and I suspect mine will be no different if I opt for that approach.

Yup there's one that the local municipal, about 4 years ago,  put in running past our house. Open topped in places. Gets rubbish build up and stagnant water in it. Not fully covered doesn't help, but it's design problem is that it's flat-bottomed. Should have been benched falling to a say 8 inch half pipe in the centre.

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trthebees

Our house's land has a slight slope towards the front garden. Rainwater build-up, particularly when heavy rain, was a nuisance. We dug a soakaway towards the front gate, about 3ft by 3ft and 4 ft down to the gravel layer. Put a welded rebar mesh grid on it. A couple of perforated plastic pipes into the sides just below the surface. It's made an improvement in that it more speedily drains the surface flooding from torrential downpours. 

As Bermuda won't take easily (due to trees affecting the ground I think, I'm no expert!), our next possible step is to buy in some pebbles or reasonable looking chippings. Basically to improve the look, but would also give a drier surface when raining, if that makes sense.

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to_dave007

Which direction would the water normally/naturally drain if you left it alone in a heavy heavy rain.  My own preference would be to plan drainage in that direction..  as nature has done it for years.

Put a little planning into your canals, and they shouldn't need to run "down the middle" if you don't want them there.  If the canals are right at edge of property they may not even need to be covered.

Make your drainage plans for the REALLY heavy rains that come with a major typhoon, not for your every day tropical rains.  French drain isn't likely to handle the really big rains very well, but it may help the pond dry up quickly afterwards.

When is a canal NOT a canal?  We have an uphill slope behind my house, and in heavy typhoon lots of water can come down the hill.  When we were doing construction, once it came right in the back door and through the living room and out the front.   today there is a 4 feet wide concrete canal at the back..  but it LOOKS like a sidewalk.  Recessed 1 step below our back veranda, sloping just 2 or three inches to either side of house.  Diverts water very well to the drains, and does not even look like a canal.

Edited by to_dave007
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JohnSurrey
6 hours ago, to_dave007 said:

Which direction would the water normally/naturally drain if you left it alone in a heavy heavy rain.  My own preference would be to plan drainage in that direction..  as nature has done it for years.

The water naturally drains off to the front and the back because we're on a bit of a hill - I'm inclined  ? to go with that - but it seems like my powerful neighbours are reluctant to go with my flow and want us to drain out the back.

I think it's been 10 years now that my wife's family have been waiting for them to complete the drain (out the back) - they don't do it because no one wants the drain going through their land! (Could it be if I do drain out the back I end up having to take the whole drain through our land too ?)

The main drain that the drain out the back would connect to is about 100 Meters away - so I am being encouraged to drain to the back, naturally uphill, a distance of some 130 Meters

Whereas the easy solution would appear to be to simply drain out the front, naturally downhill, a distance of some 50 meters away from the main drain there...

The gradient for our flow to the front (Checked last night) is 1:55 inches - 1.83%

The gradient for our flow to the back is 1:2400 inches 0.04%

Not rocket science is it...

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Headshot

I think you already have this figured out. Just let the property drain to the front like it probably always has. I'm not sure what makes your neighbors "powerful", but they likely can't do anything about what you do with your own property.

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to_dave007

sounds to me that the water is ALREADY flowing out the front.

If the chapel or church out front needs better drainage, then they should get it.  Just a piece of real estate like any other.  However it might be a nice gesture to offer to buy some materials to donate to a drainage improvement project at the church.

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JohnSurrey
35 minutes ago, Headshot said:

I think you already have this figured out. Just let the property drain to the front like it probably always has. I'm not sure what makes your neighbors "powerful", but they likely can't do anything about what you do with your own property.

Land owners, councillors, sponsors and next Barangay Capitan... etc

I've checked the law and you're not allow to intervene with the natural flow of the water without providing an alternative route for it to flow away... that's the Filipino Law not the local "Barangay Law" that seems to apply here.

 

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