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Dafey

@RR3 Well you are certainly in one of the most protected areas of the Philippines from Typhoon.

An issue arises during the aftermath of a Super Storm and the collapse of the infrastructure. Those in Cebu island did not get hit with the full force of Yolanda, (was it only 5 years ago the biggest Typhoon in recorded history?), but they surely felt a little of the repercussions.

Example: Ormoc, Leyte is the home to one of the only Geothermal electric plants in the world. It supplies electric as far as Cebu and Manila. If the plant is devastated by natural disaster the effects will be felt all over the country. You may not lose electric if you're in Dumagette but you will surely suffer more brown outs than usual.

Let's say you do lose power for a significant time. This may effect your water source from the municipality. You have a well? Good on you! I hope you are planning on sharing with your local community as they will be searching for water and will eventually resort to acquiring it at whatever means necessary. 

You've been a good neighbor and sharing your water but the added stress from so much of a draw on that well dries it up or it collapses. Now your out of water until the municipality gets back in business.

I won't even get into looting and pillaging when the police can't protect you.

Not trying to scare anyone...just putting out the facts. Prepare or watch the drama unfold and put your trust in the powers that be.

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Five  things off the top of my head: 1.  Get a generator for fans, power supply and refrigerator. 2.  Get water cans, know a separate source of water supply, our have your own well. 3. 

You all missed the most important supply.   RED HORSE.       You have water carbs and protein all in one bottle.      

1. Make sure you have a place to properly store the generator fuel. 2. In addition to water cans, keep several cases of bottled water on hand at all times.  3. If you don't have a wall aroun

19 minutes ago, Dafey said:

@RR3 Well you are certainly in one of the most protected areas of the Philippines from Typhoon.

An issue arises during the aftermath of a Super Storm and the collapse of the infrastructure. Those in Cebu island did not get hit with the full force of Yolanda, (was it only 5 years ago the biggest Typhoon in recorded history?), but they surely felt a little of the repercussions.

Example: Ormoc, Leyte is the home to one of the only Geothermal electric plants in the world. It supplies electric as far as Cebu and Manila. If the plant is devastated by natural disaster the effects will be felt all over the country. You may not lose electric if you're in Dumagette but you will surely suffer more brown outs than usual.

Let's say you do lose power for a significant time. This may effect your water source from the municipality. You have a well? Good on you! I hope you are planning on sharing with your local community as they will be searching for water and will eventually resort to acquiring it at whatever means necessary. 

You've been a good neighbor and sharing your water but the added stress from so much of a draw on that well dries it up or it collapses. Now your out of water until the municipality gets back in business.

I won't even get into looting and pillaging when the police can't protect you.

Not trying to scare anyone...just putting out the facts. Prepare or watch the drama unfold and put your trust in the powers that be.

Duma or Valencia has geothermal power plant, capacity dont know.

You talking of disaster like in the movie 2012. Then I am Charlie Frost ?

OT Still I am more concerned of the great leader of the free world than any natural phenomena 

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Soupeod

Folks are running to the store to stock up:

Quote

 

https://www.stripes.com/news/pacific/hawaii-residents-brace-themselves-as-hurricane-strengthens-1.543705

Hawaii residents brace themselves as hurricane strengthens

  • image.jpg

Bryce and Dom Boeder of Waimea, Kauai, load their truck with storm supplies in the parking lot of a Walmart store in Lihue, on the island of Kauai, Hawaii, Tuesday, Aug. 21, 2018.

DENNIS FUJIMOTO/THE GARDEN ISLAND VIA AP

 

By JENNIFER SINCO KELLEHER | Associated Press | Published: August 22, 2018

HONOLULU — Hawaii residents rushed to stores to stock up on bottled water, ramen, toilet paper and other supplies as they faced the threat of heavy rain, flash flooding and high surf as a strengthening hurricane continued to churn toward the state.

On Tuesday night, the National Weather Service announced that Hurricane Lane had become a Category 5 hurricane, which means that it is likely to cause catastrophic damage with winds 157 mph or above. The hurricane is about 500 miles (804 kilometers) southeast of Honolulu.

Earlier Tuesday, the weather service issued a hurricane warning for Hawaii island and a hurricane watch for Oahu, Maui and other smaller islands, meaning tropical storm-force winds, excessive rain and large swells could arrive starting Wednesday.

Hurricane Lane "is forecast to move dangerously close to the main Hawaiian islands as a hurricane later this week, potentially bringing damaging winds and life-threatening flash flooding from heavy rainfall," the weather service's Central Pacific Hurricane Center warned as it got closer to the state.

The storm had been moving west, but it is expected to turn northwest toward the state Wednesday.

  • image.jpg

Brianna Sugimura unloads supplies for riding out the storm while her children, Radon-Kai and Kanaloa watch in the parking lot of a Walmart store Tuesday, Aug. 21, 2018, in Lihue, on the island of Kauai in Hawaii. 
DENNIS FUJIMOTO/THE GARDEN ISLAND VIA AP

There's uncertainty to Lane's path — whether it moves north or south, meteorologist Gavin Shigesato said.

"It is much too early to confidently determine which, if any, of the main Hawaiian islands will be directly impacted by Lane," the weather service said.

But the hurricane center said the storm will move very close to or over the islands from Thursday through Saturday. Even if the center of Lane doesn't make landfall, the islands could be walloped with rain and wind.

Public schools on the Big Island and in Maui County are closed Wednesday until further notice.

Hawaii Gov. David Ige is allowing non-essential state employees on the Big Island and Maui to go on administrative leave from Wednesday to Friday as Hurricane Lane approaches. Employees on Hawaii and Maui islands who work in disaster response as well as in hospitals and prisons are required to report to their jobs, the governor said.

 

 

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to_dave007
On ‎5‎/‎5‎/‎2018 at 7:33 AM, Jawny said:

I have three generators, with several hundred liters of fuel.

Water is available, and can be boiled for drinking.  I live in an area wth spring water.  Our electrical pump works as well.

Banking was shit down for an extended period during Yolanda, but with a good relationship with the bank, a passbook account was useable. 

I have a significant amount of cash in a safe place, accessible in an emergency.

Not excessive amounts of food in storage.

 

No generator here..  but I have a freezer now so maybe it's time to splurge.  Managed fine for a month after Yolanda without one.  Likely cheaper to cook up all the goat meat and throw a party instead of buying a generator.

Cash is important.

We have a 6000 gallon water tank now, and we can bucket the water out if we need to..  and if typhoon passes it's likely to be full.  Water was fine when we drank it before, But I'm thinking something like a Sawyer water filter might be a good idea..  $35.  www.sawyer.com.  Owner of local bottled water company lives 500 meters from me and is a good friend.

We have gas cooker (with Gasol) but wife is happy to cook on firewood if need be.

Food was readily available after Yolanda..  here in the province.. likely better than in city.  Not worried about food.

One issue we had after Yolanda was finding a way to let family back in Canada know we were ok.

Wish I had a telescope for those power out nights..

Loved NOT hearing the music every day.  (and reading LINC)

I didn't think a month without power was so bad.  It was an adventure, and we enjoyed it.

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On 5/22/2018 at 4:30 AM, RR3 said:

Cebu city on the east side.

I remember Yolanda, we only got some rain and little stronger winds ?

I remember Yolanda roads impassable due to downed trees and flooding for 12 days, bamboo houses flattened many blown into the highway no trees left standing mountains turned brown , 5 months with no power or water over 100 dead in our local area, no cell service as towers were down  no food in grocery stores had a platoon of soldiers stationed at our rice mill as there command centre blew down and we offered them a dry place to live at least they kept the peace and order trying to save 10,000 bags of finished rice that got wet when ware-house wall was blown down at least the local people all helped us as we cooked the damp rice and gave out for free to everyone many families home less staying in our warehouses that still had roofs, the Canadian Soldiers bringing food packs to the people the local govt providing 2 cans of sardines and kilo of rice per family each week 6 months of repairs to our buildings with insurance only wanting to cover 45 % of the damage Yes I remember Yolanda

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to_dave007
On ‎5‎/‎5‎/‎2018 at 9:33 AM, Dafey said:

do a reality check on where you live and if it will be safe.

Good point.

I know there are other internet sites, but there are a couple of specific sites that I keep bookmarked so that I can check out the weather forecast quickly.

To see the typhoon forecast..     https://www.hurricanezone.net/  shows the existing typhoons quickly and at the bottom of that page there's a two week forecast of "likely conditions".

I like to check out wind speed and direction (and other stuff) at www.windy.com.  Not perfect but good enough.  Can also see any low pressure areas easily, even if not typhoons.

To see the 7 day tide forecast I use https://www.tide-forecast.com/locations/Cebu-Philippines/tides/latest   .  If a typhoon is coming I'd like to know when the highest winds will come ashore, and what the tide condition will be then.  My old (82) Canadian friend lives right on the beach, and at the highest high tide this summer the water level was less than 4 feet below floor level, so with big waves it could be a problem.   He's had to evacuate a couple times in the past.  The typhoon in January 2014 actually did more damage to coastal structures here in Tuburan than Yolanda, precisely because the strongest on shore winds occurred exactly at high tide.

Edited by to_dave007
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Dafey
2 hours ago, to_dave007 said:

at the highest high tide this summer the water level was less than 4 feet below floor level

Good point...during a Typhoon the sea level, (not just the waves), can be extremely high. Remember it's a 'Low' pressure zone on steroids! Combine that with high tide during a full moon and water levels could quickly raise 15 feet. Add the waves from the storm surge and you have a destructive force that can take out most anything in it's path.

I live 27 ft above sea level about 50 meters from the shore. You better believe I'm evacuating in a strong storm!

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Got through many typhoons in Japan. Lost the roof twice, car destroyed. Here it's a different story. Our house is strong enough to not suffer any structural damage but that was not the problem. No infrastructure exists. We had to evacuate to another island after Yolanda and Ruby a year after that. Ref and freezer full of food had to be eaten quickly or sold off.  Zero communications for months means no phone signal, no bank, shops emptied, gas station empty etc. Too dangerous to travel. I had by chance lots of cash, canned food, noodles, candles. But this only last so long. Got hit in November but no signs of normality until February.  You may 'think' you are ok but supplies will only last so long and there are other factors to consider. 

Best thing for me was the local community. No looting here.

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