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JamesMusslewhite

Building a Floating Net Platform for Lobster 'grow-out' Aquaculture

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JamesMusslewhite

For those who like watching videos of lobsters in a net as much as I like making them, then this new one is for you.

 

    This one is 'number 5' in an ongoing series, and I will try (providing the weather, electric company and internet all cooperate) add a new video every two weeks. I should finally finish and upload the first video of the 3-part Lobster 101 series in the next few weeks. This 3-part series has been a three year project requiring the collection and editing of over 800 slides, diagrams, drawings and photos. I also have had to learn the VirtualDub, ProShow, Open-Shot, Audacity and Ocenaudio programs to learn which worked best and could work together. The information for this project required the outlining of what became an 84 page voice-over script. I must apologize in advance for the voice-over work is primitive at best. All recorded using my Android cellphone, mostly while sitting outside in one of the bungalows or porch, always late night/early morning when most quite. Even then it still required constant stoppages due to passing fishing boats, barking dogs and karaoke squawking.

   The '101' 3-part video series covers the bulk of information I accumulated over the last nine years of personal research, pertaining to lobster aquaculture and the lobster aquaculture industry. I am safe in saying that it is extremely doubtful that you can find a collective wealth of useful information together in one source anywhere else on the internet. I know as it took me nine years and thousands of hours to collect what I am openly sharing to the viewers. So when the first video is released in the next few weeks, please excuse amateurish voice work. I am after all on a little 8 hector island on the edge of a deep-water mangrove, so it is the best this old Texas boy can provide. I will probably bore you all to sleep or to tears with my South Texas monotone voice, but the quality of the information, artwork and photos collected in this presentations should still make these three videos (when completed) a good watch.    

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Dafey

Awesome James....Yum!

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RogerDuMond

Do you have any problem with die off James?

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BryanWill123

James, bamboo in seawater. How long do you estimate that will last before it deteriorates too much? Do you treat it in any way prior to immersion?

thanks

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JamesMusslewhite
16 hours ago, RogerDuMond said:

Do you have any problem with die off James?

   Yes. the two primary causes of mortality is (M.D.S.) Molting Death Syndrome which is the inability of a lobster to successfully release itself from it's old exoskeleton during their molt, and cannibalism; and in enclosures stocked at high densities, acts of cannibalism of individuals during molting increases. I provide mesh-shelters in my enclosures so molting individuals can use the shelters, but many lobsters prefer to climb the sides of the nets were they will molt. I can only assume that this preference aids in their shedding of the old exoskeleton. Lobsters are clever little sea bugs and also opportunistic and will prey on molting individuals. The exoskeleton of a newly molted individual is so soft that it can not even support their body weight for the first 10-12 hours after the successful completion of the molt. The new exoskeleton can take 11-13 days to fully harden, and while their new exoskeleton is still soft the individual is vulnerable to acts of aggression and predation. This is why lobsters during their three Juvenile developmental stages (Algal-juvenile, Post-juvenile and Latent-juvenile) require shelters because these three juvenile stages are when they are most aggressive and prone to cannibalism.

   The last video I posted is of the 406 young Algal-juvenile we had delivered to the net enclosure. It was taken last week and shows our first stock count. All the individuals were removed from the enclosure and placed them in a small temporary net enclosure. They were counted twice (once being put in the net, and again when removed) and the new count was 397 individuals. We had 9 moralities due to either M.D.S. or cannibalism. I added a second net within the enclosure to isolate the largest juvenile lobsters from the smaller individuals. 

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JamesMusslewhite
15 hours ago, BryanWill123 said:

James, bamboo in seawater. How long do you estimate that will last before it deteriorates too much? Do you treat it in any way prior to immersion?

thanks

The bamboo platform should last long enough to raise two crops before having to be replaced. The netting should last 3-5 years. Bamboo can be treated and supposedly will last up to 35 years in home construction, but if used in the construction of a floating platform I have never read any information. It is something that I am considering. But first you must make a metal bore rod and have a submersion pit, as the bamboo must be bore-drilled so the solution can fill the individual chambers (whole length) of the bamboo. The bamboo also must be fresh-cut and quickly (2-4 hours) submersed in the solution. Only fresh-cut lengths will properly absorb the borax/boric acid  solution. So you must be prepared an cut and process the bamboo in the field, which is no easy task. For me it is easier to just build and replace the platforms every two years.

   Next spring I will build a new platform and put it into service, and then another the next year; so when the first platform needs replacement the drums, nets and shade-cloths will be used in the next build. Two crops and the platform will more than paid for it's replacement, and this yearly building of new platforms means no disruption in production. The old platform when retired will then be disassembled and used to make trellises and shade frames in our gardens. And when the bamboo is simply just too old to use, it will be composted to use as soil amendments in the grow beds. 

Edited by JamesMusslewhite

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