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What's proper wire for home wiring?


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Woolf

ours look like those shown here 2.5 mm2 or the ones shown in an earlier post

 

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Remember for 220/240 for same effect current is half of what is needed for 110/120 so I think you americans may be will use to thick a wire, thinking you need the same as home in usa

I have managed to accumulate a wide range of electrical connectors from various sources here over the years.  Twist types, screw types, even the plastic ones described above in Thailand.  Those are th

1, the advantages of single solid core electric wire is: anti tensile strength, not easy to mold off, anti surge current strong, easy shaping, etc.. The disadvantages are: poor flexibility, poor resis

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Salty Dog
1 hour ago, Woolf said:

Wire nuts are not legal in many countries

not in Denmark and I think someone mentioned some time ago not in UK

Many countries and not in Denmark! Are you sure they are not legal, or maybe it's just that they aren't used.

I thought most countries used the IEC which I don't think prohibits the use of twist on connectors (wire nuts).

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Woolf
8 minutes ago, Salty Dog said:

Many countries and not in Denmark! Are you sure they are not legal, or maybe it's just that they aren't used.

I have never seen wire nuts been used in Denmark

I have seen them in mainframe computers we imported from USA and in USA

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A_Simple_Man
6 hours ago, lopburi3 said:

twisting with wire nuts

If you are referring to the "twist together only" wire nuts then I agree they are not fantastic, but I do like the locking wire nuts like this one:

wirenut1.jpg

They used to be the primary type of household wire connector in houses I worked on in Canada and the only ones I have ever seen come apart are the ones not screwed to the right tightness.  Does the rest of the world not use these?

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trthebees
5 hours ago, Woolf said:

I seen some the sizes at atlantic hardware Tabunok, Talisay

Yes I got some there, don't know what size now but I think assorted. I'd already brought lots from the UK, and used them for wiring located in nice white boxes with blank lids. I think it's important that they have brass inserts, as one thing about the regs is that the contact must be secure and of compatible materials to resist oxidation at the points of electrical continuity....although I know that you know that!!...just mentioned for anyone it in case steel inserts are offered.

 

 

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trthebees

From what I can gather about wirenuts....haha old name scruits in the UK.

I've stripped them out of old houses. the wiring was stranded cotton covered, and they were the old porcelain ones. Inevitably cracked. They weren't suited to the newer more common use of solid conductors, didn't screw correctly as the idea was to push the conductors in and let the screwing twist the cables together. They made themselves against regulations by being uncertain connections for solid wire. Also, modern ceiling roses, loop-in power circuit junction boxes, etc and the like come equipped with full sets of screwed terminals. Fast to wire and secure, cheap, and easy to carry out mods, fit new ceiling rose etc or do any separating and  testing.  Llghting wire in the UK has, I believe, dropped from 1.5 to 1.0mm, using a 6 amp circuit breaker, one downstairs one up for modest houses.. Hope they don't try to go any smaller as LED etc lights are using even less current.Although I do use non-marking wire strippers.

I think...though needs someone from the US to confirm...stranded is used more for fixed wiring.and the wirenuts have improved their technology over there to give secure  connections...

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SkyMan
8 hours ago, Headshot said:

buy lots of wire nuts in various sizes

I brought back a large container of Ideal Wire nuts.  The ones here, if you can find them, are very small for maybe small wires in a karaoke machine but not for house wiring.  It also seems the ones here are only a plastic threaded cap where the Ideal wire nuts have a small threaded metal insert.  If you need to put electrical tape on  it to hold it you're doing it wrong.

 

9 hours ago, Woolf said:

The wire push in outlets are designed for 1.5 to 4 mm2 or there about

rigid cu only

the green ones in below picture

 

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Yes, it is possible to push a stranded wire into those those but a PITA.  If using stranded be sure to buy outlets/switches with the screw type connections but the white one in the picture above appears to have both.types.  Putting solid wire on a screw can also be a PITA.

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lopburi3

I know I am repeating myself but the way to go for connecting wires in the 21st century is Wago.  Excellent connection that can be removed at any time but will not slip out or damage wire and really easy to use.  

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A_Simple_Man
12 hours ago, lopburi3 said:

the way to go for connecting wires in the 21st century is Wago

Thanks for the tip, the YouTube video is great, but as you have used them I want to ask you if you can connect different wire gauges?   One of the reasons I always liked the screw type wire nut (as I pictured earlier) is because it is easy to take a 12 gauge wire and join it to two 14 gauge wires.  Can you use different gauges of wire with the Wago?

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lopburi3
41 minutes ago, A_Simple_Man said:

Thanks for the tip, the YouTube video is great, but as you have used them I want to ask you if you can connect different wire gauges?   One of the reasons I always liked the screw type wire nut (as I pictured earlier) is because it is easy to take a 12 gauge wire and join it to two 14 gauge wires.  Can you use different gauges of wire with the Wago?

Yes you can - each is a separate connection to main bus and accepts from awg 28 - to awg 12 (solid or stranded wire).  Connection is very solid and well insulated (unlike screw connections - have had many melt and short).  They a bit more expensive but having used them for the last several years I believe well worth the price.

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Headshot
19 hours ago, Woolf said:

Anyone seen single stranded wire use in a car ???

on a bike ???

There is a huge difference between AC and DC when it comes to the effects on wire. It is the vibrations caused by the cycling in AC that fatigues wire over time. It is not the same stress as bending wire back and forth as you might get with electrical wiring in a vehicle, and it affects the wire in completely different ways.

Obviously, I am not going to change minds on this, since most people in the electrical industry are taught through the "old Joe" method (where a practice is established and taught through the generations. Nobody questions the validity of the method because it has always been done that way.

However, Skyman is an American, and in the US, it is very rare to see stranded conductor used for AC house wiring. Wire nut connectors are also the norm for AC house wiring.

As far as wire nuts providing a good connection, once they are tightened down, they never loosen up. The plastic cover insulates the connection, and since there are no moving parts, there is little that can go wrong. That said, I would NOT recommend them for use on vehicle wiring, since water and contamination are likely to get into the connections. That is unlikely in home wiring, but if water and contamination does get into the connections, you have much bigger problems than your house wiring.

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Davaoeno
5 minutes ago, Headshot said:

It is the vibrations caused by the cycling in AC that fatigues wire over time

Bill - you are so knowledgeable on so many different topics that you continually amaze me !!  I wish I knew half as much as you do !!   :thumbs_up:

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Woolf
32 minutes ago, Headshot said:

It is the vibrations caused by the cycling in AC

I would like to see a study/reference to that argument 

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Jawny

I have managed to accumulate a wide range of electrical connectors from various sources here over the years.  Twist types, screw types, even the plastic ones described above in Thailand.  Those are the worst as they just don’t work as intended.

eEcen when I don’t have any project in mind, I’ll check the electrical section of stores in the hopes of adding to my collection.

However, my favorite connector is the type I was shown at one of the larger hardware stores(Belmont, Atlantic, Home Builders??) I don’t recall which one.  I had been there before and bought electrical connectors, but couldn’t recall which aisle, so I asked, clearly and was clearly understood.  As the assistant walked with me to the aisle, I asked if they had the "twist" type.  He said "Better, than that, we have one size fits all and in many colors"

He was absolutely correct.  One size, fits all and in colors of your choice.

Electrical tape.

 

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