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What's proper wire for home wiring?


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Woolf

my favorite drawings

parts of manila same as veco

utility power N america-veco-cebeco.jpg

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Remember for 220/240 for same effect current is half of what is needed for 110/120 so I think you americans may be will use to thick a wire, thinking you need the same as home in usa

I have managed to accumulate a wide range of electrical connectors from various sources here over the years.  Twist types, screw types, even the plastic ones described above in Thailand.  Those are th

1, the advantages of single solid core electric wire is: anti tensile strength, not easy to mold off, anti surge current strong, easy shaping, etc.. The disadvantages are: poor flexibility, poor resis

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Jester
3 hours ago, oztony said:

Don't use solid , use stranded , solid is garbage and no good for various reasons IMO...

The entire country of America is wired with solid wire, including RV's!  I am not a boat person so don't know for sure but any boat wire I have seen is fine stranded.  I do run stranded from the disconnect switch to the outside AC unit because of vibration, I am probably the only person that does.   

 

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A_Simple_Man

This calculator (click for link) is easy to use.

It says that a single phase, 240 volt source, with a 20 amp breaker, with a maximum 50 foot run of wire, with allowable voltage drop of up to 5%, will be OK with a 14 gauge copper wire.

I bet Filipinos use thinner wire because the same system on a 15 amp breaker only needs a 16 gauge copper wire.  The problem is they use the 16 gauge wires with a 20 amp breaker.  That could be a problem one day.

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Jawny

The only wire I’ve seen used here has been 12 and 14 gage (aside from the 10 used for ovens). I’m referring to wire inside the house.  Not the lead in wire from the power supply.

 

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Woolf

There is nothing wrong in using over size wires, it is just a waste of copper = money 

Edited by Woolf
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oztony
8 hours ago, Jester said:

The entire country of America is wired with solid wire, including RV's!  I am not a boat person so don't know for sure but any boat wire I have seen is fine stranded.  I do run stranded from the disconnect switch to the outside AC unit because of vibration, I am probably the only person that does.   

 

1, the advantages of single solid core electric wire is: anti tensile strength, not easy to mold off, anti surge current strong, easy shaping, etc.. The disadvantages are: poor flexibility, poor resistance to fracture, poor skin resistance, poor heat dissipation.Sep 5, 2016

www.xagalaxycable.com/info/which-is-better-single-core-or-1321662.html

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SkyMan
9 hours ago, A_Simple_Man said:

This calculator (click for link) is easy to use.

It says that a single phase, 240 volt source, with a 20 amp breaker, with a maximum 50 foot run of wire, with allowable voltage drop of up to 5%, will be OK with a 14 gauge copper wire.

I bet Filipinos use thinner wire because the same system on a 15 amp breaker only needs a 16 gauge copper wire.  The problem is they use the 16 gauge wires with a 20 amp breaker.  That could be a problem one day.

Thanks for that link.  It's telling me 10AWG because it's a long run and I want to be safer on 30Amp.  I've heard of homes here hooked up with phone wire.

9 hours ago, Woolf said:

There i nothing wrong in using over size wires, it is just a waste of copper = money 

The reason I'm asking the question. My initial thought was 8AWG, same as outside.

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Jawny
13 minutes ago, SkyMan said:

Thanks for that link.  It's telling me 10AWG because it's a long run and I want to be safer on 30Amp.  I've heard of homes here hooked up with phone wire.

The reason I'm asking the question. My initial thought was 8AWG, same as outside.

Keep in mind that the wiring will need to connect to the wall sockets, if that is part of your plan. Number 8 gage would not fit into many wall plugs as they are designed for smaller sizes. You can always splice a short smaller gage wire, but that creates its own set of problems. I’ve nevrr had issues using 12 and 14 gage for normal circuits. 

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Goetz1965

You have electricity in your home ?

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Twisted wire is somewhat better than solid wire as far as carrying capacity is concerned. It is also more flexible if you are running it thru conduit. As you probably know the lower the number on the gauge, the larger the wire. In Philippines only one wire, (side) is hot the other side of the plug is neutral which is hooked to the ground. 

I wired my house with 14/2 with ground that I bought at Lowe's in US when they were discontinuing that size because US regs now call for 12/2 with ground for all lights and plugs.  Even 14 was overkill for the LED lights we installed.

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Woolf

The wire push in outlets are designed for 1.5 to 4 mm2 or there about

rigid cu only

the green ones in below picture

 

Related image

 

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A_Simple_Man

As a side note, I have someone cleaning my exhaust fan in the kitchen and he showed me where "some bugs were eating the wiring".  It seems them red ants around here (and maybe other bugs too) eat the insulation on the wires causing shorts if you don't keep an eye on things.  Surprised the heck outta me but here is a link on it.

http://articles.extension.org/pages/30057/ants-and-electrical-equipment

 

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Woolf
15 minutes ago, Daddy said:

In Philippines only one wire, (side) is hot the other side of the plug is neutral which is hooked to the ground. 

WRONG

That depends what supply area you are in

VECO is 2 hots

see the drawings I provided earlier in this thread

Edited by Woolf
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Same goes for Cepalco, CdO -   2 Hot

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lopburi3
41 minutes ago, A_Simple_Man said:

As a side note, I have someone cleaning my exhaust fan in the kitchen and he showed me where "some bugs were eating the wiring".  It seems them red ants around here (and maybe other bugs too) eat the insulation on the wires causing shorts if you don't keep an eye on things.  Surprised the heck outta me but here is a link on it.

http://articles.extension.org/pages/30057/ants-and-electrical-equipment

 

The primary wire eater seems to be the house mouse/rat - and they are the cause of many appliance failures (although you may not be told it just required replacement of a wire to fix).

Ants get into switch areas and make a home shorting them out.

House lizards like to lay their eggs in light/outlet areas and that can also cause shorts - not to mention the lizard itself getting across wires in toasters and such.  

Edited by lopburi3
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