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JohnSurrey

Working Student Options ?

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JohnSurrey

I have a niece who works full time as a yaya and is being helped to through private college, maybe 1 or 2 nights a week (doing 4 or 6 units a year I believe), studying to be a teacher - 4 year (?) course...

An Auntie from the US (who was over recently) said she was wasting her time as by the time she finished she'd probably be too old... Then saying she would be better to give up her job and study full time - if she can find a sponsor (looking at me presumably) - I struggle to look after my own so I am unlikely to be helping anymore than I already do.

Anyway I'm looking at enrolling my kids at the same private college - so whilst I am there looking at their fees I have a quick look at the teaching course... registration costs etc P2,500 + P400 unit/semester - How many units I say - For teaching it's about 30 (per semester) in the first year, maybe 25 for the following years - Gulp!... so Y1 approx P26,500 - without the books (I bet that's another P20,000) - Add on the uniform and other bits and pieces and it's like P50,000 for Y1

My first thought is wtf is the niece doing there when she could go to the VSU and get the fees paid (per the new rule introduced in 2017) but I think I remember my wife saying she cannot transfer because she'll have to start at the beginning again...

So just wondering - is there a better way she can try to do this - does anyone have experience of working student arrangements - doing 4-6 units when the full time option is 30 per semester - seems like a bit of a piss take to me ?

Also is there something I'm missing about this - why do people enrol at the private college and not the state one - I had another niece who studied a year at the (state) VSU (teaching) but then quit to study at a private school???

I'm confused :D

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Jawny

Some of the costs may be less than you thought.  Tuition and school fees are pretty predictable based upon the standard costs each semester.  Books are nowhere near as high as you’d think, since a lot of the courses don’t use textbooks but rather handouts and such.  Uniforms are often quite inexpensive.

Not sure why some would use a private college, but this may be based upon course offerings, convenicience or lower costs.  Costs at VSU are quite reasonable.  

It is not uncommon to have credits "lost" when transferring.  As far as starting over, that would depend upon which credits are transferable.  

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Headshot
5 hours ago, JohnSurrey said:

Also is there something I'm missing about this - why do people enroll at the private college and not the state one - I had another niece who studied a year at the (state) VSU (teaching) but then quit to study at a private school???

I'm confused :D

It is simple. The standards at the state universities are much higher than the standards at the private universities. At CNU (Cebu Normal University), it is very difficult to get accepted to start school). You have to have good grades throughout high school, and you need recommendations from teachers and CNU alumni. Then, if you don't keep your grades up during your first year, they will kick you out. No questions asked ... and you can't get back in (which is probably what happened with the girl who changed schools after her first year). Private universities here will keep you enrolled as long as you are paying your tuition.

Along with the higher standards come higher pass rates for certification exams as well. CNU's nursing program has had a 100% pass rate on the national certification exam for six years straight. No other school in the area can say that (in fact, I'm not sure that another school in the Philippines can say that). Other programs also have high certification exam pass rates. After you graduate from a private school, you are on your own. Some schools have very low pass rates on the national certification exams, so it is something to check when looking at a school. If a large percentage of the graduates can't pass the certification exams, then what good is the school?

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Tullioz
6 hours ago, JohnSurrey said:

An Auntie from the US (who was over recently) said she was wasting her time as by the time she finished she'd probably be too old...

Unlike many jobs here in the Philippines, age is not a factor when it comes to getting a job as a teacher. I know a couple of people who did exactly what your niece is doing who didn't graduate until they were in their early 30's and are now employed as teachers.

Education and being able to demonstrate that they will be an effective teacher is what schools mainly look at when it comes to hiring. 

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JohnSurrey
2 hours ago, Headshot said:

Then, if you don't keep your grades up during your first year, they will kick you out. No questions asked ... and you can't get back in (which is probably what happened with the girl who changed schools after her first year). Private universities here will keep you enrolled as long as you are paying your tuition.

Thanks - sounds about right

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