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Bama

Anyone familiar with Philippine Police Academy ?

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colemanlee
1 hour ago, Bama said:

Yes, it is the one by the airport.

So I'm back to the Criminology Program theory now-----with its 97 % chance of the kid ending up as a guard at Robinsons.

Well at least he will be working...thats something

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Headshot
20 minutes ago, colemanlee said:

Well at least he will be working...thats something

True, but most security guards and traffic enforcers have nothing more than a high school diploma. A bachelors degree becomes a waste at that point.

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colemanlee
2 minutes ago, Headshot said:

True, but most security guards and traffic enforcers have nothing more than a high school diploma. A bachelors degree becomes a waste at that point.

Actually IMHO, a degree here for the most part (depending on the school) is a waste, for a couple of years when I first got here I would ask waitresses, girls at Robinson etc.  If they had a degree, most replied yes...so you spend four years, a shit load of money to get a job that pays around 200p per day....

 

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Jawny
1 hour ago, Bama said:

Yes, it is the one by the airport.

So I'm back to the Criminology Program theory now-----with its 97 % chance of the kid ending up as a guard at Robinsons.

There’s nothing wrong with having an undergraduate degree in criminology.  There are masters programs offered here.  Jobs are not exclusively security guards.  Other careers can be found with such a degree.  As well, some graduates may want to move on into law studies.  

My SIL completed an undergraduate degree in accounting, but found the only work in this area was quite limiting.  She went back to school,and got the credits and such for teaching and now has an excellent career as a teacher.  Not criminology, I know, but still an undergraduate degree does not necessarily lead to dead end work.

It is quite common in my family and community for someone (a relative, a godparent, a neighbor) to support a student through their undergraduate education.  College costs can be quite low here, but for some, just too much without some assistance.

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Bama

The last two posts have 2 very different viewpoints on the same subject and they are both probably correct.

1 hour ago, colemanlee said:

If they had a degree, most replied yes...so you spend four years, a shit load of money to get a job that pays around 200p per day....

Most of the underemployed people with degrees that I run into are at Home Depot,Citi Hardware,etc. They are usually easy to pick as they don't head to the back of the store when a foreigner walks in.LOL.

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Jawny

I’ve had the impression that many of the college graduates working in the retail stores and the like are there because they lack the desire to pursue the opportunities they could find.  In effect, they stay close to home which is familiar and comfortable.

Im not an expert, just an observation.

Having the college degree does allow them other options, if they are willing to pursue them.  A high school graduate here, will have a harder time finding the other opportunities.  

My BIL, now in his early thirties, worked for us as a bread wrapper for a couple of years.  He pestered and pestered until he was given the opportunity to work as a baker.  His wages increased 50pesos a day as a baker.  However, there is no further opportunity with us.

He was offered a chance a decade or more ago to go to a trade school, no cost to him.  He turned it down and instead enjoyed the life of a bachelor....until fatherhood came along.  Now,  he is stuck and his only good fortune is having relatives who will employ him.

If he had a trade or a college degree, he’d have at least a chance for some upward mobility.

College is not for everybody, of course.  However, if the kid referred to wants to continue, but just needs the money resources, it would be a good chance to improve his future.

Sorry to sound preachy.  

 

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Headshot
6 hours ago, colemanlee said:

Actually IMHO, a degree here for the most part (depending on the school) is a waste, for a couple of years when I first got here I would ask waitresses, girls at Robinson etc.  If they had a degree, most replied yes...so you spend four years, a shit load of money to get a job that pays around 200p per day....

Agreed. My FIL graduated from a two-year trade course in welding and machinery at CIT when he was younger. Today, he still works as a machinist, making about 10k a month (not exactly big bucks). Even getting a degree is no guarantee of good employment. Most courses of study have some sort of certification exam that you must pass before you can find good work. There are lots of graduates who couldn't pass their exam.

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JohnSurrey

I cannot help thinking that many of those taking degrees (here and in the west) do so because you're treated like a 2nd rate citizen or thickie if you don't have one.

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mexiwi

My BIL did Criminology at UCLM.

He passed the entrance/board exam and was applying to get into the PNP, but found he had Hep B when it came time for the medical so no go, he was pretty gutted.

He has never had a problem getting a job though and is a manager at 7/11 now.

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JohnSurrey
On 19/02/2018 at 10:47 AM, colemanlee said:

PNPA Qualifications

INITIAL QUALIFICATIONS FOR ADMISSION (PLEASE DO NOT APPLY IF YOU ARE NOT QUALIFIED) :

Natural born Filipino citizen;
18 to 22 years old on the date of appointment;
Single with no parental obligation;
At least Senior High School graduate upon admission;
At least 5 feet and 4 inches (162.5cm.) for male and 5 feet and 2 inches (157.5 cm.)  for female in height;
With weight that corresponds to the applicant’s height, gender and age in reference to Body Mass Index (BMI);
Physically and mentally fit to undergo the Cadetship Program;
With good moral character (no criminal, administrative and civil derogatory record;
Without  pending complaint and/or case before any tribunal involving moral turpitude and other cases against the State;
Not a former cadet of PNPA, or other service academies (PMA, PMMA, MAAP); and
Not have been dismissed from any private employment or government position for cause;

 

I have to admit this looks like a very good idea for those who have some brains, cannot afford University and don't mind arresting people... maybe I could suggest this to my niece 

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colemanlee

Its the goal of one of my sons, so much so, he does 75 sit ups and 25 push ups every night and keeps a 90+ average in school

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