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The process of marrying a Filipina and getting her to the USA


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RedRanger
On ‎1‎/‎18‎/‎2018 at 5:47 PM, shadow said:

The last year things have really started to tighten up. Not only is the paperwork getting more complex, but they are now enforcing requirements that were always on the books but they have always overlooked in the past, and doing a much more thorough investigation of the US petitioners.

For K1's they have lightened up.  For over two years they have not been asking for Affadivit of support or tax returns or employment letters on K1's

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This may sound facetious, but it's not.  We fought immigration for near 3.5 years before my wife got her visa and we moved to the states.  We moved to Cambodia due to the situation on Mindanao and we 

Since you live here, the quickest and easiest visa for her to get is the CR1/IR1 filed using DCF method (Direct Consular Filing, you file directly to the Embassy instead of sending it to the USA). The

Hi Skyman, It sounds like the two of us have different ideas about what is paradise.   I'm all in with that...to each his own. When I was just out of college, I was in the Peace Corps, in Mi

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RedRanger
On ‎1‎/‎14‎/‎2018 at 10:03 PM, Alk said:

I know this has been covered before, but since i'm about the start the marriage/visa process here in Cebu in a couple of months, I'd thought I'd ask a few specific questions, beyond those I asked a month or so ago.

I've been in the Philippines for  3 years, and I had planned on living here for the foreseeable future, but I'm completely losing my patience over the last 3 months dealing with Cebu traffic, which seems to be  getting worse by the week.  Now that Ayala has partially burned down, my frustration level has risen a bit higher.  The upside of living here  with a permanent partner just isn't really here now.   Living a western lifestyle here in Cebu City in a nice condo is not really that much less than living in parts of the USA...in fact it completely disappears when I add in the fact that my college educated fiance makes $400 in a good month here, and could easily make 5 times that much in the USA, and have a much better life for herself if I should unexpectedly pass on.

So. the plan is to leave the Philippines for the USA in the first half of 2019.   During the interim, I need to get married, fill out all the necessary paperwork for my wife's visas, and then head to the USA..    

Questions.... I'm assuming it is better to get married here in the Philippines rather than in the USA...is that the case?   What is the easiest path for getting my future wife's paperwork in place to move permanently to the USA with me, and how long will that take?    I want to be sure that by around April of next year, I can board an aircraft for the USA with my wife in tow without an legal worries.  

Are there other issues I should be concerned with?   Since I've been with my fiance for 3 years, worries about her leaving me once I arrive in the USA, are fairly low.  I know who she is.

As always, any replies replies I receive are greatly appreciated.

DCF is the best route and quickest as well.

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shadow
6 hours ago, RedRanger said:

For K1's they have lightened up.  For over two years they have not been asking for Affadivit of support or tax returns or employment letters on K1's

BS.

Interview checklist;

image.thumb.png.0f7068007d4d2e70a175213b8c844905.png

https://ph.usembassy.gov/wp-content/uploads/sites/82/2016/08/K1-and-K2-Applicant-Interview-Preparation-Instructions-08112016-English-336KB.pdf

Manila will always want to see some form of support. We have someone hung up now until he can prove to them his income is sufficient.

We did have one who got through last year, that I thought "no way". But don't count on it happening in every case.

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RedRanger
18 hours ago, shadow said:

BS.

Interview checklist;

image.thumb.png.0f7068007d4d2e70a175213b8c844905.png

https://ph.usembassy.gov/wp-content/uploads/sites/82/2016/08/K1-and-K2-Applicant-Interview-Preparation-Instructions-08112016-English-336KB.pdf

Manila will always want to see some form of support. We have someone hung up now until he can prove to them his income is sufficient.

We did have one who got through last year, that I thought "no way". But don't count on it happening in every case.

Rarely is it asked the last two years and some CO's have said to applicants that it was truly never needed.   The I-134 is not legally binding anyways.  

Here is the letter they are sending out recently, no mention of AOS

Congratulations on your upcoming immigrant visa interview.  Your file is now with the U.S. Embassy in Manila and we have had a chance to review it.  Based on our review, you need to bring the following documents with you to your interview:

 

 

FROM APPLICANT(S)

- Application Fee

- DS-160 form for [NAME, FIANCEE] Completed new DS-160 application form(s) to be filled-out online at https://ceac.state.gov/iv/

- Birth Certificate issued by the Philippine Statistics Authority (PSA) for [NAME, FIANCEE]

- Certificate of No Record of Marriage (CENOMAR) issued by the Philippine Statistics Authority (PSA) within the past 12 months for [NAME, FIANCEE]

- Medical examination results for [NAME, FIANCEE]

 

CLEARANCES

- National Bureau of Investigations (NBI) Clearance issued within the past 12 months for  [NAME, FIANCEE]

 

Please remember to bring with you:

- Bring a valid passport and all expired passports for each applicant.

- Bring a confirmation page from your DS-160 online application for each visa applicant.

 

- If you have lived in a country other than the Philippines or the United States for more than 12 months, please submit a police clearance from that country.  For more information please go to: http://travel.state.gov/content/visas/english/fees/reciprocity-by-country.html, search for the country you lived in before, and look at the information provided in the "police records" section.

- All applicants must register their delivery address online.  We are unable to deliver your passport and visa if you fail to register a delivery address. To register online, click on the “Select Document Delivery Address” link under the Immigrant Visas section of our website (http://www.ustraveldocs.com/ph/).  Once there, click on the first link under the “More Actions”  to register a delivery address for the first time, or to change an existing delivery address. If you have any question(s) on how to register a delivery address, please contact Manila’s Visa Information and Appointment Service Center at (632) 976-8500, (632) 976-8501 or (632) 976-8502.

 

We hope this email helps you prepare for your interview.  If you are unable to obtain all of the requested documents, you may still attend your interview at the U.S. Embassy. However, if you do not bring these documents to your interview, it will delay the issuance of your visa.

 

 

Sincerely,

 

Immigrant Visa Section

U.S. Embassy

Manila, Philippines

 

 

 

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shadow
1 hour ago, RedRanger said:

Rarely is it asked the last two years and some CO's have said to applicants that it was truly never needed.   The I-134 is not legally binding anyways.  

Here is the letter they are sending out recently, no mention of AOS

Congratulations on your upcoming immigrant visa interview.  Your file is now with the U.S. Embassy in Manila and we have had a chance to review it.  Based on our review, you need to bring the following documents with you to your interview:

 

 

FROM APPLICANT(S)

- Application Fee

- DS-160 form for [NAME, FIANCEE] Completed new DS-160 application form(s) to be filled-out online at https://ceac.state.gov/iv/

- Birth Certificate issued by the Philippine Statistics Authority (PSA) for [NAME, FIANCEE]

- Certificate of No Record of Marriage (CENOMAR) issued by the Philippine Statistics Authority (PSA) within the past 12 months for [NAME, FIANCEE]

- Medical examination results for [NAME, FIANCEE]

 

CLEARANCES

- National Bureau of Investigations (NBI) Clearance issued within the past 12 months for  [NAME, FIANCEE]

 

Please remember to bring with you:

- Bring a valid passport and all expired passports for each applicant.

- Bring a confirmation page from your DS-160 online application for each visa applicant.

 

- If you have lived in a country other than the Philippines or the United States for more than 12 months, please submit a police clearance from that country.  For more information please go to: http://travel.state.gov/content/visas/english/fees/reciprocity-by-country.html, search for the country you lived in before, and look at the information provided in the "police records" section.

- All applicants must register their delivery address online.  We are unable to deliver your passport and visa if you fail to register a delivery address. To register online, click on the “Select Document Delivery Address” link under the Immigrant Visas section of our website (http://www.ustraveldocs.com/ph/).  Once there, click on the first link under the “More Actions”  to register a delivery address for the first time, or to change an existing delivery address. If you have any question(s) on how to register a delivery address, please contact Manila’s Visa Information and Appointment Service Center at (632) 976-8500, (632) 976-8501 or (632) 976-8502.

 

We hope this email helps you prepare for your interview.  If you are unable to obtain all of the requested documents, you may still attend your interview at the U.S. Embassy. However, if you do not bring these documents to your interview, it will delay the issuance of your visa.

 

 

Sincerely,

 

Immigrant Visa Section

U.S. Embassy

Manila, Philippines

 

 

 

I agree it was a worthless form anyway, but they do still ask to see proof of financial capability, at least sometimes.

The AOS uses the I-864, but of course you knew that too.

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RedRanger
24 minutes ago, shadow said:

I agree it was a worthless form anyway, but they do still ask to see proof of financial capability, at least sometimes.

The AOS uses the I-864, but of course you knew that too.

Sometimes they do, but it seems as the general rule is they don't ask anymore.  I would tell anyone to have it available. 

I am on a immigration forum that deals with Philippines only section, and have watched the changes that come and go in general on K1's. Especially for USEM.

I have done 3 K1's myself all from Philippine, So I follow all the changes. Last one I did was 3 years ago. we have filed for 10 year GC and wife only has extension letter from USCIS. She has had extension letter for like 6 months now, we are still waiting for Biometric appointment letter

 

 

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Salty Dog
38 minutes ago, RedRanger said:

we have filed for 10 year GC and wife only has extension letter from USCIS. She has had extension letter for like 6 months now, we are still waiting for Biometric appointment letter

They are currently taking about 12-16+ months to approve and issue the new green card, depending on which service center you went through. My wifes extension letter expired and she had to get an infopass appointment to get a stamp in her Passport for another 12 months.

You might want to call them about your Biometrics appointment letter. We received it 10 days after the I-751 Receipt Notice (listed as Form CRI-89 on the case history log). Her Biometrics were completed only a few weeks after the appointment letter was received. 

gc.JPGgc2.JPG

 

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shadow

Bottom line is USCIS is a mess right now. K1s that were getting NOA2 approval notice in 3 months a little over year ago, are now taking 8 months, and counting. There are new forms being used across the board, and forms that were used for many years no longer being accepted. The Embassy has become a whimsical nightmare to get any information from, probably at least partially because they don't know either.

This has happened before, and I am sure it will happen again. It seems about every 10 years they go through this type of clusterfeck.

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user333

They stopped accepting new DCF appointments in May 2018 at the Manila embassy. You have to mail you application to the States now, although I did see something 2 months ago where they said you could submit it online. The average wait time for a spousal visa is 12-16 months and it broken into 3 stages: USCIS, NVC, medical/CFO/embassy interview. You can look at free guides on the VisaJourney website. I followed them and was approved for the USCIS stage in 5 months (8 months is the posted timeframe). I'm on the NVC section now and plan on it taking 2-3 months. Once you're approved for the visa at the embassy, you have a few months to enter the States before your medical exam validity expires.     

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RogerDuMond
19 hours ago, user333 said:

The average wait time for a spousal visa is 12-16 months and it broken into 3 stages: USCIS, NVC, medical/CFO/embassy interview.

Wow, how times have changed. In 1993, ours was approved in 3 months and that included the paperwork being lost at NVC for two weeks.

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Headshot
On 1/4/2020 at 4:55 AM, user333 said:

They stopped accepting new DCF appointments in May 2018 at the Manila embassy. You have to mail you application to the States now, although I did see something 2 months ago where they said you could submit it online. The average wait time for a spousal visa is 12-16 months and it broken into 3 stages: USCIS, NVC, medical/CFO/embassy interview. You can look at free guides on the VisaJourney website. I followed them and was approved for the USCIS stage in 5 months (8 months is the posted timeframe). I'm on the NVC section now and plan on it taking 2-3 months. Once you're approved for the visa at the embassy, you have a few months to enter the States before your medical exam validity expires.     

Isn't the medical good for six months still? The medical generally comes within days before the interview. This is definitely one area where the US Government hasn't done us any favors. Closing down USCIS at the US Embassy in Manila was a mistake.

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user333

Correction: They stopped accepting new DCF appointments in May 2019 at the Manila embassy. 

Most of the time, yes, the medical validity period does expire in 6 months. If you pass your medical exam on May 1, and you pass your interview on June 1, you have to enter the States before Nov 1. The US visa entry expiration date is not six months from when you pass the interview. It's six months from the medical. The interview dates could be busy/filled up, so there's no guarantee that you can do you medical just days before your interview. 

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