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Aerosick

Rare Snowstorm Just Blanketed Parts Of The Sahara Desert In Up To 16 Inches Of Snow

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Aerosick

https://www.forbes.com/sites/trevornace/2018/01/08/rare-snowstorm-just-blanketed-parts-of-the-sahara-desert-in-up-to-16-inches-of-snow/#58f4e02427ee

Yesterday, Algerians living in the Sahara Desert found themselves in a winter wonderland as up to 16 inches of snow covered the desert dunes. This rare event has occurred only three times in the past 37 years nearby the town of Ain Sefra in Algeria.

The typical red sand dunes which stretch out as far as the eye can see were covered in a blanket of white. This coincides with just as extreme weather in other parts of the world. The east coast of the United States continues to face the brutally cold winter storm Grayson and Sydney, Australia swelters in the hottest temperatures seen in nearly 80 years at 116.6 degrees Farenheight.

High pressures over Europe caused cold air to be pulled down into northern Africa and into the Sahara Desert. This mass of cold air rose 3,280 feet to the elevation of Ain Sefra, a town surrounded by the Atlas Mountains, and began to snow early Sunday morning.

sahara-snow-2.thumb.jpg.5e4f22e51ec1014d94bab4194b865853.jpg

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shadow
11 minutes ago, Aerosick said:

https://www.forbes.com/sites/trevornace/2018/01/08/rare-snowstorm-just-blanketed-parts-of-the-sahara-desert-in-up-to-16-inches-of-snow/#58f4e02427ee

Yesterday, Algerians living in the Sahara Desert found themselves in a winter wonderland as up to 16 inches of snow covered the desert dunes. This rare event has occurred only three times in the past 37 years nearby the town of Ain Sefra in Algeria.

The typical red sand dunes which stretch out as far as the eye can see were covered in a blanket of white. This coincides with just as extreme weather in other parts of the world. The east coast of the United States continues to face the brutally cold winter storm Grayson and Sydney, Australia swelters in the hottest temperatures seen in nearly 80 years at 116.6 degrees Farenheight.

High pressures over Europe caused cold air to be pulled down into northern Africa and into the Sahara Desert. This mass of cold air rose 3,280 feet to the elevation of Ain Sefra, a town surrounded by the Atlas Mountains, and began to snow early Sunday morning.

sahara-snow-2.thumb.jpg.5e4f22e51ec1014d94bab4194b865853.jpg

I think this is part of global warming.

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SkyMan
22 minutes ago, Aerosick said:

as up to 16 inches of snow covered the desert dunes.

Looks from the picture like he measured that with his dick.

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Ozepete

It's more evidence of that 'Global Cooling'  Those bloody camels are sucking up too much carbon dioxide and stuffin' up the atmosphere!  :rofl:

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badian

nothing to do with 'global cooling' at all. It does snow, in the areas around the Mediterreanean and always has. Not all that often, especially in some places, but it does snow. 

the picture made it into the newspapers because of the incongruity of there being snowfall in the desert, it makes a good picture, but as the article says it has snowed there in Algeria 3 times, in the past 37 years which means it is not even all that rare that it snows - it is quite often. Rome, Italy, much further north, gets it less often than that, they can expect it to snow about once, every 25 years there. It can snow anywhere around the Mediterreanean and always has. 

 

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JamesMusslewhite

Wow so Hell does freeze over....

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smokey

We saw snow on top of mountain in palm springs so rare but no doom and gloom there

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badian

There's periodic historical episodes of cold like 'the little Ice Age' which affected North America however that was before there was reliable records.

In the classical European world around the Mediterranean where where we know about the weather over about 3,000 years from what people have said - it's always snowed on occasion. Even in that part of the Sahara Desert which is now Algeria.

P.S. the Sahara Desert was still the Sahara Desert. Even 3,000 years ago.

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broden

luckily those desert sheiks have their harems to keep them warm

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Aerosick

I think the 1st 2 words of this Topic "Rare Snowstorm" sums it all up.

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