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220V induction cooktop, connect to local power (Tacloban)


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I was wondering if this could be used with the power available in tacloban:

 

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Goetz1965

Sure that will work - you can buy those in every mall here too.
Just be cautious not to place it on a metal rack or such - the induction will work both ways - above AND BELOW the plates !!

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  • 3 months later...
Freetochat

Old topic I know. Just caution against getting a double appliance. If you use both plates at same time, either one will draw priority for heat, or they will alternate. It is better to have two single appliances for constant heat. 

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Woolf
16 minutes ago, Freetochat said:

Old topic I know. Just caution against getting a double appliance. If you use both plates at same time, either one will draw priority for heat, or they will alternate. It is better to have two single appliances for constant heat. 

???????  where did you get that idea from ????????

please explain

Edited by Woolf
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oztony

Having 2 appliances side by side is going to make zero difference than having 1 appliance with 2 elements or 3 or 4 elements for that matter ....

Imagine you want a 4 element cooktop ...what are you going to do ....line up 4 single element cooktops all next to each other ....all drawing from the same power source anyway....

 

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Freetochat

The appliances are design to be plugged into a wall socket with a maximum rating. Mostly maximimum 3 kw. Therefore a two ring maxes out and has load balance.   A four ring hob would by hardwired.  A single plate can utilise the full 3kw. 240c will use about 2.1 Kw, therefore it only leaves 900 watts left for the second ring.  Both rings could not be used at the boiling setting.

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oztony

So this all based around operating on a shared circuit as opposed to having a dedicated circuit for the cooktop ........ even so the cable size and circuit breaker size would have to have some play in the equation as well ....what is this based on ...2 mil cable , 10 amp breaker...?

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Woolf

This cook top

5205_402550.jpg

one plate is 1500 watt, the small one is 800 watt, both thermostat comntrolled

no problem running both on 230v and a 10/12 amp fuse

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Freetochat
19 hours ago, Woolf said:

This cook top

5205_402550.jpg

one plate is 1500 watt, the small one is 800 watt, both thermostat comntrolled

no problem running both on 230v and a 10/12 amp fuse

This proves my point 2.3kw total.  Induction would be the same.  

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Woolf
3 hours ago, Freetochat said:

This proves my point 2.3kw total.  Induction would be the same.  

And your point was ????

 

That you could NOT run both plates at the same time ???

my outlet breakers here are 30 amp, I could run 3 of the table top cookers at the same time with both plates on

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Freetochat

The point I was makng that two single appliances will give you maximum heat on induction, whereas a double plate gives reduced heat because of load balance.  As indicated on the example product that you showed. For boiling point it is best to have 2.1kw at 240c to be effective, unless you wish to wait a long time, which defeats the objective of induction speed cooking.

Advice over

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oztony

Thats what I love about this place ...everyone gets to have a say....:)

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trthebees
1 hour ago, Woolf said:

And your point was ????

 

That you could NOT run both plates at the same time ???

my outlet breakers here are 30 amp, I could run 3 of the table top cookers at the same time with both plates on

I'd looked at the breakers generally available here...the DP MCB types used in consumer units were impossible to find below 16A. Also i didn't like a spaghetti of spurs. So i went a different route.

I've used a 40A DP MCB with 30mA RCD. Quite enough for a house here as there';s no heating, and we shower cold. Then a 32A MCB socket supply using a ring main, (2x2mm at 18Amp nominal capacity each is ok as ring is not too long), and 6A lighting MCB. The ring is looped in as much as possible rather than cut and joined.

We've run an independent earth using 3 pin sockets.

We have an aircon, a gas cooker with one electric hotplate and grill, about 2 kw together and the usual fridge etc.

Because of the RCD, the numerous garden lights which can get damp and outside shed is taken from a 16A MCB connected seperately.

I've put a warning note in the box regarding the ring and RCD in case I'm ever away and my wife has to call a local electrician.

Well, as Oztony says, everyone gets to have a say! 

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Freetochat

It has nothing to do with house wiring, but the manufacture of the hotplates.  Anything exceeding 3kw must (should) be hardwired.  So those designed for socket connection are restricted.

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