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Is Auntie tha same as in the States?

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Jess Bartone

Sorry Tony it was not intended as a "victory" old mate, just reinforcing that my experience was localised and that there are no blanket rules.

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colemanlee
9 minutes ago, yee said:

how did that go for you

So Im just curious do you practice mano?

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bounder

I am amazed when walking around (which I do quite a bit) the amount of men who call me "boss".   Kids will call me "tito" and a few trike drivers will call me "Amigo".    However, I am sure there are several who think because of my walking, that I might qualify in the gago kano category.  

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yee
16 minutes ago, colemanlee said:

So Im just curious do you practice mano?

Yes, my mother will be on my case all day if I don't and I won't hear the end of it. 

But... we're kinda off topic here..

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colemanlee
Just now, yee said:

we're kinda off topic here.

I dont think so...its fits in nicely with how you address people...but Im impressed, you must be the youngest and newest mod on the forum...

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oztony
On 12/8/2017 at 3:38 PM, oztony said:

 

Our border , who is younger than my wife calls her Ate , my wife refers to all of her aunts as Ate ... 

aaaacebuano.JPG

 

 

1 hour ago, yee said:

it's not used as a shortcut but i understand the confusion.

 

 I suppose it can be debated til the cows come home , the above post is from page 1 of this thread ....think about the word itself "Ate" do you not consider that this word derived from Auntie...

A lot of other words have evolved the same way into the Filipino languages ...any way my wife reckons ate is auntie and after 14 years I have ever won an argument ....ever ...I have got three Bisaya/ Cebuano ladies is my living room at this moment , one from Cebu , one from Negros and one from Davao... and 2 of them are saying that ate is auntie and 1 is saying they are different but can be used as the same...welcome to the land of confusion ....

I'm out , I capitulate ...it is just so much easier this way ....although haggling here is way way easier than haggling with ako asawa..... :respect::why-me::not_see:

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yee
5 minutes ago, bounder said:

I am amazed when walking around (which I do quite a bit) the amount of men who call me "boss".   Kids will call me "tito" and a few trike drivers will call me "Amigo".    However, I am sure there are several who think because of my walking, that I might qualify in the gago kano category.  

Ehhh... why gago?

They're calling you "boss" as a prospective customer - because the customer is "boss." 

"Amigo" means friend... 

Why are the kids calling you?

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yee
14 minutes ago, colemanlee said:

I dont think so...its fits in nicely with how you address people...but Im impressed, you must be the youngest and newest mod on the forum...

Hehe. Not trying to be a mod. Just trying not to piss off the mods ;)

 

Uhm @oztony I'll check with my cebuano officemates how they use it here because "Ate" is tagalog. 

It's not derived from auntie because Auntie is english. Tita is tagalog.

We can debate on it respectfully, don't worry. I killed the cows, they're never coming home.

Edited by yee

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bounder
11 minutes ago, yee said:

Why are the kids calling you?

The children that I know call me Tito.  No one calls me gago, it was meant as a humorous addition.  Yet, I am the only foreigner around that walks in the town and country.   I doubt if the workers calling me boss are hoping for employment.  I didn't or don't know them and usually they are workers doing a job for someone else.  Most people will either say Mayong Aga (Buntag in Cebuano) or Mayong Hapon.  If there are those who are eating outside, they will invite me to eat with them, Mahaw (said in the morning).  The ones calling me Amigo are the ones hoping for a passenger....ha ha ha.  

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Jess Bartone
16 minutes ago, oztony said:

 

 

 I suppose it can be debated til the cows come home , the above post is from page 1 of this thread ....think about the word itself "Ate" do you not consider that this word derived from Auntie...

A lot of other words have evolved the same way into the Filipino languages ...any way my wife reckons ate is auntie and after 14 years I have ever won an argument ....ever ...I have got three Bisaya/ Cebuano ladies is my living room at this moment , one from Cebu , one from Negros and one from Davao... and 2 of them are saying that ate is auntie and 1 is saying they are different but can be used as the same...welcome to the land of confusion ....

I'm out , I capitulate ...it is just so much easier this way ....although haggling here is way way easier than haggling with ako asawa..... :respect::why-me::not_see:

Onya Tony, too much diversity to have strict rules.

 

4 minutes ago, yee said:

"Ate" is tagalog. 

Which puts it in an entirely different light. Going back to wife's local custom, "auntie" is not used to my knowledge, it's either Ate for big sister or older female, or Tita for an actual auntie. Bearing in mind that Cebuano and Visayan are not entirely the same language, and that I am little more than a tourist.

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yee
5 minutes ago, bounder said:

The children that I know call me Tito.  No one calls me gago, it was meant as a humorous addition.  Yet, I am the only foreigner around that walks in the town and country.   I doubt if the workers calling me boss are hoping for employment.  I didn't or don't know them and usually they are workers doing a job for someone else.  Most people will either say Mayong Aga (Buntag in Cebuano) or Mayong Hapon.  If there are those who are eating outside, they will invite me to eat with them, Mahaw (said in the morning).  The ones calling me Amigo are the ones hoping for a passenger....ha ha ha.  

Oh, i thought they were offering service calling you boss. well... they just want attention then :)

Just smile back. It's great to have pleasantries on the streets. We rarely have that in Manila, esp from people you don't know. Same in your country?

Btw. If anyone calls you "Auntie" then maybe that's where a "Gago!" retort comes in handy.

 

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colemanlee
1 minute ago, yee said:

retort comes in handy.

One that works for me and is pretty funny, is when the people yell "Hey Joe"  reply with "Hey Phil"

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bounder
1 minute ago, yee said:

Same in your country?

Where I used to live in rural America, if you didn't acknowledge people passing when you met them, then it was a form of disrespect OR they become very suspicious of you (if a stranger).  Here where I live now, basically everyone is acknowledged/recognized....at least by me.  You have others who like to exhibit their superior status which I personally consider part of the culture. here.   

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yee
10 minutes ago, Jess Bartone said:

Which puts it in an entirely different light. Going back to wife's local custom, "auntie" is not used to my knowledge, it's either Ate for big sister or older female, or Tita for an actual auntie. Bearing in mind that Cebuano and Visayan are not entirely the same language, and that I am little more than a tourist.

Yup. Auntie is not a Filipino word. Cite spelling. We don't have words ending in "ie." This is some sort of westernization. Some see it as more classy compared to the local term. I don't. It's still Tita for me.

3 minutes ago, bounder said:

Where I used to live in rural America, if you didn't acknowledge people passing when you met them, then it was a form of disrespect OR they become very suspicious of you (if a stranger).  Here where I live now, basically everyone is acknowledged/recognized....at least by me.  You have others who like to exhibit their superior status which I personally consider part of the culture. here.   

Haha. In contrast, in manila, in a busy street, if a stranger smiles at you, you get suspicious and look around.

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yee
11 minutes ago, colemanlee said:

One that works for me and is pretty funny, is when the people yell "Hey Joe"  reply with "Hey Phil"

Kichi kichi yaya dada.

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