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Travis

Is Auntie tha same as in the States?

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Travis

Does Auntie mean one of your parents siblings or can it also mean something else?

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davehud

Yes and yes. It means your aunt. It can also mean any older unrelated woman.

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oztony

More often than not it is shortcutted to Ate.

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Travis

Thank you gents

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Woolf
47 minutes ago, oztony said:

More often than not it is shortcutted to Ate.

Ate is sister in cebuano

most often the eldest sister, can also be used for a woman that is older than you

that is my understanding

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Dafey

Ate is a tag used to show respect to an older, (than you), female. Sometimes sounds like auntie but different. That being said Aunt or uncle is used pretty freely even for those that are close but may not be related.

Kuya, (pronounced fast sounds like cleo) is the tag for showing respect to an older male.

I get a kick out of hearing a 3 year old call a 5 year old Ate!

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lamoe
10 minutes ago, Dafey said:

 That being said Aunt or uncle is used pretty freely even for those that are close but may not be related.

Last time at Bohol

Charity: Oh look, there's my Auntie, come meet her

Me: Mother or facther's sister?

Her: No, just friend to them.

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RogerDat

My pronunciation is ah tee, it is one expression of respect. There are many here.

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SkyMan
3 hours ago, Dafey said:

Ate is a tag used to show respect to an older, (than you), female. Sometimes sounds like auntie but different. That being said Aunt or uncle is used pretty freely even for those that are close but may not be related.

Kuya, (pronounced fast sounds like cleo) is the tag for showing respect to an older male.

^^^ This.   Just note that Ate and Kuya are Tagolog though used commonly in the Visayas.  The Cebuano terms for not necessarily related older female/male are Manang (Nang) and Manoy.  And often besides Aunt and Uncle (which are also not necessarily related and sometimes Uncle is shortened to just the last syllable Cull) you often hear Tita/Tito which are Spanish.  The real Cebuano for aunt/uncle are iyaan/uyoan.  An old enough elder may be called Lola or Lolo (or just Lo) but the real cebuano for grandparent is apohan as a grandchild is an apo.

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oztony
4 hours ago, Woolf said:

Ate is sister in cebuano

most often the eldest sister, can also be used for a woman that is older than you

that is my understanding

 

3 hours ago, Dafey said:

Ate is a tag used to show respect to an older, (than you), female. Sometimes sounds like auntie but different. That being said Aunt or uncle is used pretty freely even for those that are close but may not be related.

Kuya, (pronounced fast sounds like cleo) is the tag for showing respect to an older male.

I get a kick out of hearing a 3 year old call a 5 year old Ate!

Our border , who is younger than my wife calls her Ate , my wife refers to all of her aunts as Ate ... 

aaaacebuano.JPG

 

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Dafey

I forgot...Buang Cano is a show of respect for an american expat...they call me that all the time!!!

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bernadette
1 hour ago, Dafey said:

I forgot...Buang Cano is a show of respect for an american expat...they call me that all the time!!!

really? as in Buang Cano is  a show of respect for an american expat?! i don't think so because in my understanding it means Crazy American...Buang is Cebuano Term for Crazy

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SkyMan
13 minutes ago, bernadette said:

really? as in Buang Cano is  a show of respect for an american expat?! i don't think so because in my understanding it means Crazy American...Buang is Cebuano Term for Crazy

Shhhh, let Dafey live in his world.

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Soupeod

I've only been called his imperial Majesty Kano.  /Grins

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Salty Dog
7 hours ago, soupeod said:

I've only been called his imperial Majesty Kano.  /Grins

You wanna bet...:yahoo:

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Dafey
18 hours ago, bernadette said:

really?

Just teasing Bernadette...a joke for those who understand. Thanks for keeping me honest.

(and I've never been called buang cano...to my face)

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Headshot
On 12/8/2017 at 7:19 AM, Travis said:

Does Auntie mean one of your parents siblings or can it also mean something else?

An aunt here is called Tita. Ate is a title used for older sisters or any older woman who is like an older sister to you. For instance, my wife has always called her choir director from when my wife was in high school Ate Vinover.

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shadow
13 minutes ago, Dafey said:

Just teasing Bernadette...a joke for those who understand. Thanks for keeping me honest.

(and I've never been called buang cano...to my face)

Really? You must not be having much fun!

In this area, as often as not, Ate is shortened to simply "Te". 

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Dafey
13 minutes ago, shadow said:

Really? You must not be having much fun!

Yeah...they tell me I don't act like a cano. Maybe I should step up my game a little?

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yee

Auntie is synonymous to Aunt. We also use Tita.

We also use "Auntie" or "Tita" to address our friends' parents. Also, boyfriends' or girlfriends' parents before we transition to calling them the way our significant others call them once we're set to get married.

In general, "Auntie" or "Tita" is used to address women who are too old to qualify as your older sister or "Ate."

[ Side info. We call service crew as "Ate" or "Kuya' , (translates to big sister or big brother, respectively) In my experience, I still call crew as "Ate" or "Kuya" because I forget that I'm older and I'm so used to calling them that. I have transitioned to calling them "Miss" and "Sir" to give them the respect they deserve and the 'pride at work' feeling.]

In Manila, "Tita" is more widely used.

In the past, when you en counter a woman in her 50's, people will call her "Nanay" - translates as Mother but this does not sit well with a lot of women because it gives the feeling that you called her "old."

So, in Manila (not sure here in Cebu,) the classy way to go is to call them "Tita" instead of "Nanay."

 

 

Edited by yee
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Headshot

My wife just told me that in CWO (Catholic Women's Organization) the seniors (adults) in the organization are always called tita by the junior members (teenagers}.

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Jess Bartone
On 08/12/2017 at 10:28 AM, oztony said:

More often than not it is shortcutted to Ate.

As we all know there are no blanket rules in the Philippines, but where my wife comes from this is simply wrong. The only connection to "auntie" is that it sounds vaguely similar.

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Davaoeno
8 hours ago, yee said:

Auntie is synonymous to Aunt. We also use Tita.

We also use "Auntie" or "Tita" to address our friends' parents. Also, boyfriends' or girlfriends' parents before we transition to calling them the way our significant others call them once we're set to get married.

In general, "Auntie" or "Tita" is used to address women who are too old to qualify as your older sister or "Ate."

[ Side info. We call service crew as "Ate" or "Kuya' , (translates to big sister or big brother, respectively) In my experience, I still call crew as "Ate" or "Kuya" because I forget that I'm older and I'm so used to calling them that. I have transitioned to calling them "Miss" and "Sir" to give them the respect they deserve and the 'pride at work' feeling.]

In Manila, "Tita" is more widely used.

In the past, when you en counter a woman in her 50's, people will call her "Nanay" - translates as Mother but this does not sit well with a lot of women because it gives the feeling that you called her "old."

So, in Manila (not sure here in Cebu,) the classy way to go is to call them "Tita" instead of "Nanay."

 

 

I have yet to figure out where Inday fits into the scheme of things ?

Lots of women seem to start off calling my wife Ma-am, or Teach .  She will usually tell them to call her [ one of the above names ! lol ]

I gave up trying to figure out which one she chooses to tell them . But everyone seems to understand the pecking order [ created by society, certainly not by my wife ! hehe ]   

I also have a hard time figuring out which people she choses to call Sir and Ma-am .

When I first got here people were calling me Attorney , which I asked them not to do . Now its always Sir Ian ,  [ or if someone on Linc just plain Shithead !! lol ]

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oztony
16 minutes ago, Jess Bartone said:

As we all know there are no blanket rules in the Philippines, but where my wife comes from this is simply wrong. The only connection to "auntie" is that it sounds vaguely similar.

 

On 12/8/2017 at 10:28 AM, oztony said:

More often than not it is shortcutted to Ate.

Is your wife from a Bisaya / Cebuano background ? Maybe I should have been clearer in the context I was referring to , but I would still say as I first stated "more often than not" ,

Hell , on my side of the island "sabot"means understand , on the other side of the island it means pubic hair .....anyway ...if it is "simply" wrong it shouldn't be too tricky....:biggrin_01:

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yee

@oztony it's not used as a shortcut but i understand the confusion. people do interchange it based on how they deem appropriate.

I go to a store, there's a 50 year old woman, I call her "Ate" because I'm used to calling people that. Another store, there's a woman almost same age, looks stern, I smile, "Hi, Tita. Merong keme keme keme..?"

~~~

Just a warning... Don't call anyone Tita unless they look about double your age. Or well, y'know... wrath of women.

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