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Flakes

How good is ur Visaya or Tagalog?

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Alfred E. Neuman

Maayu kaayu, dili makalibak mga bisaya.

Makaintindi konti.

Para bailar la bamba.

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Headshot
9 hours ago, Flakes said:

I have lived 15 months in Jakarta and still remember some bahasa indonesia sentences. That language might be simular to here ? If i would learn 500 basic words it might be very handy. But even tough  living in Cebu i guess i will choose Tagalog?

Tagalog is no more used (outside of the Tagalog-speaking area of Luzon) than English. Tagalog is the language used on Filipino TV and English is the official language of government (although a lot of government business is conducted in the native language of the area). Together, they are the official languages of the Philippines. Luckily, most Filipinos know at least enough English to communicate, and a large percentage are very fluent. You can survive here just fine without knowing either Bisayan or Tagalog. If you think that knowing Bisayan or Tagalog will get you better deals at the market, you are probably wrong. Dual pricing here is based on your appearance, not on what language you speak.

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oztony
4 minutes ago, Headshot said:

If you think that knowing Bisayan or Tagalog will get you better deals at the market, you are probably wrong. Dual pricing here is based on your appearance, not on what language you speak.

Your purchase price ability will greatly improve by knowing the language , this is my experience over the last 14 years anyway....

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M.C.A.

Headshot language does help when it comes to prices in the market,  I've been out and about trying to have an English conversation and nobody has a clue what I'm saying, they giggle they laugh at one another but have no idea what I'm saying and I'm asking for simple basic necessities, example colors, numbers, pickles, relish, flour, sugar, vinegar, tofu... These are all items have had serious issues ordering at the market places but after learning Tagalog and also prices I do get the lowest price because if I don't I won't  buy it.

You survive with the language barrier only because you might have an in-law escort or the wife translating but I've taken those training wheels off, I get tired of people following around with me, I know the newbies they always have tag along and I feel sorry for them but eventually they learn it takes years for some.

Edited by M.C.A.
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Headshot

It hasn't been my experience. Speaking Bisayan will get you smiles, but my wife has still always been able to get better deals without me. That said, my Bisayan is poor, at best.

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Flakes
1 hour ago, Headshot said:

Tagalog is no more used (outside of the Tagalog-speaking area of Luzon) than English. Tagalog is the language used on Filipino TV and English is the official language of government (although a lot of government business is conducted in the native language of the area). Together, they are the official languages of the Philippines. Luckily, most Filipinos know at least enough English to communicate, and a large percentage are very fluent. You can survive here just fine without knowing either Bisayan or Tagalog. If you think that knowing Bisayan or Tagalog will get you better deals at the market, you are probably wrong. Dual pricing here is based on your appearance, not on what language you speak.

Yes i agree just in some situations where the other person can not speak English it can be handy. I did notice most locals do appreciate it if u know some words i often get asked by locals if i can speak their language which so far i can not.

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oztony
13 minutes ago, Flakes said:

Yes i agree just in some situations where the other person can not speak English it can be handy.

 Probably a typical opinion from someone with little experience in the PI  , only when you spend some solid time there and converse with the locals will you see the difference.

They see it as a sign of respect that you have taken the time and effort to learn their language and they are then also aware that you are not a greenhorn so their pricing becomes ...shall we say more accurate.

Some people spend years there and let their wive's do all the transacting on day to day stuff , I choose not to isolate myself from the locals like this and have found it far better ...for me anyway. 

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Flakes
5 minutes ago, oztony said:

 Probably a typical opinion from someone with little experience in the PI  , only when you spend some solid time there and converse with the locals will you see the difference.

They see it as a sign of respect that you have taken the time and effort to learn their language and they are then also aware that you are not a greenhorn so their pricing becomes ...shall we say more accurate.

Some people spend years there and let their wive's do all the transacting on day to day stuff , I choose not to isolate myself from the locals like this and have found it far better ...for me anyway. 

U take my post out of context. I said its handyfor example in a taxi when the driver speaks no english. Yes it might help negotiating to buy a mango for 70 pesos instead of 80 pesos. But the more important thing is that locals especially in phills really seem to appreciate it if a foreigner can speak some local sentences. So why not make the efford to study it a bit. I now speak 5 languages at a medium level (not writing) and it not bothers me to ad another one! Fyi most native English countries citizens master one language at the most.

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Headshot

Well, if you can speak Spanish, it isn't much of a jump to speak either Tagalog or Bisayan. There are a lot of Spanish words in both languages, and they use mostly Spanish pronunciation and grammar rules.

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Flakes
27 minutes ago, Headshot said:

Well, if you can speak Spanish, it isn't much of a jump to speak either Tagalog or Bisayan. There are a lot of Spanish words in both languages, and they use mostly Spanish pronunciation and grammar rules.

I speak French German Dutch English and Thai. Spanish has a lot of similarities  with French so I should be fine.I think i begin with Tagalog words.

Edited by Flakes

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Monsoon

 

Speak it well enough and they will mistake you / assume you are Filipino of some sort.

In fact, that is exactly how it has been asked of me on occasion, "Serr, what kind of Filipino are you?" 

 

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Flakes
15 minutes ago, Monsoon said:

 

Speak it well enough and they will mistake you / assume you are Filipino of some sort.

In fact, that is exactly how it has been asked of me on occasion, "Serr, what kind of Filipino are you?" 

 

Haha Maybe because u to much with u face in the sun? If u see me its obvious i am not a Pinoy even if i would speak the language fluently 

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Monsoon
3 minutes ago, Flakes said:

If u see me its obvious i am not a Pinoy

That's what I thought too...

But one gets asked a lot of things in the Philippines that you would think are just obvious...

 

 

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Busted Dick
10 hours ago, Davaoeno said:

As I recall the promo on Linc promised your money back to anyone who wasn't happy with the course

Not sure but I was very happy with the course so wouldn't be interested in a refund.

9 hours ago, oztony said:

Your purchase price ability will greatly improve by knowing the language , this is my experience over the last 14 years anyway....

I agree.  Once they know that you are making an effort to learn the language, or at the least have a few words in your vocabulary, then you are very much less likely to get ripped off.  I pay local prices at my local market; at least with the stallholders who know me.

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TequilaSunset

I 'm learning Visayan for the GF, it makes her happy, and as a military brat growing up in Germany I remember all to well being forced to learn German in school. The military felt it was important to attempt to assimilate, and so do I (plus i want to know some of the chit being spoken around me) 

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