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Paul

When is enough, really enough?

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Alan S

It is strange (or perhaps not) how peoples ideas differ.

 

I didnt want to retire, but did so, then went back to working again, as I enjoy it.

I plan to keep on as long as I possibly can.

 

OK, I have cut back on the hours I do, and pick and choose what I want to do (easy when you work for yourself), but I dont plan to give up until I really have to.

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Bastos

My story is similar to Pauls in that my dad too died at 63. He was in the process of retiring at the time. I gave up on working for a living at 50. Now all I do is work on a horrific golf swing, ride my scooters and shoot my guns as often as possible. I gotta do something to keep out of my sweet lil asawa's hair. Lifes too short to not live it.

Edited by Bastos
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Joe Kano

Yep, my story is similar to a lot of guys here with a dad who died at 63 of a heart attack. If he hadn't retired early, he would have never seen one day of retirement. I'm eligible for an early retirement right now at 55, but my Filipina wife doesn't want me to retire while she still works. She doesn't want to be the "bread winner" while I stay at home every day. I said, "Honey, Don't worry. I'll STILL be the bread winner because my pension will bring in more money than your full time bank job". Well, needless to say, that didn't go over very well.

 

An early retirement for me would mean having to sell the 5 bedroom family home and moving to a less expensive condo because we wouldn't be able to afford the mortgage payment here. It would mean taking our 12 year-old daughter away from he friends moving to a lower class neighborhood and school. It would mean keeping the old cars we currently have because we wouldn't be able to afford a car loan. It would mean our daughter would be strapped with student loans because we wouldn't be able to help her with college expenses. And it would mean the wife would have to cut back on her mall spending each weekend.

 

So let's see.... retirement, freedom, less stress, no more getting up in the mornings to go to work, healthier lifestyle, longer life span, time to pursue other interests - verses - an unhappy wife and kid and a lower standard of living.

 

Hmmmmm.... what to do, what to do?

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Bob Ward
Yep, my story is similar to a lot of guys here with a dad who died at 63 of a heart attack. If he hadn't retired early, he would have never seen one day of retirement. I'm eligible for an early retirement right now at 55, but my Filipina wife doesn't want me to retire while she still works. She doesn't want to be the "bread winner" while I stay at home every day. I said, "Honey, Don't worry. I'll STILL be the bread winner because my pension will bring in more money than your full time bank job". Well, needless to say, that didn't go over very well.

 

An early retirement for me would mean having to sell the 5 bedroom family home and moving to a less expensive condo because we wouldn't be able to afford the mortgage payment here. It would mean taking our 12 year-old daughter away from he friends moving to a lower class neighborhood and school. It would mean keeping the old cars we currently have because we wouldn't be able to afford a car loan. It would mean our daughter would be strapped with student loans because we wouldn't be able to help her with college expenses. And it would mean the wife would have to cut back on her mall spending each weekend.

 

So let's see.... retirement, freedom, less stress, no more getting up in the mornings to go to work, healthier lifestyle, longer life span, time to pursue other interests - verses - an unhappy wife and kid and a lower standard of living.

 

Hmmmmm.... what to do, what to do?

 

Your case is different in a number of ways I think. You have responsibilities and obligations that would affect many other people adversely. Only if your health was at risk would I make that move.

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jazzy
First and foremost, this is no reflection whatsoever, on Volstateguy. He has been on these forums for a very long time, and posts rarely, but posts loudly. An excellent post that he made today, caused me to think of a topic that has come up often over the years.

 

The above quoted text is from the Living off Military Retirement thread. Now, on to my advice.

 

While planning your retirement certainly should be well thought out and planned, each of you need to consider the most important thing. That is, when is enough, really enough? When will you be financially secure enough to take that step and finally retire? When will you have enough to fulfill your retirement years' plans?

 

Over my years in the Philippines, I have met guys from other countries who were planning to take the leap here, to live out their retirement years. Many have communicated with me through my own websites. Yet, others met me through other on line forums or Philippines related Yahoo Groups of which I am associated.

 

Unfortunately, after getting to know some of these guys on a more personal level, usually by having questions asked of me off-line, or a phone call or two through the ol' VOIP phone, I learned that they were too scared to actually stop working. They were nervous about liquidating their lives and moving to a country they had not visited, or had limited contact with in the past. In every single case, there was one common denominator, "I don't think I have enough money to retire yet, Paul." Okay, so when is enough, enough, folks?

 

Each of us has to make that individual decision. For me, I thought about one thing, my father, J.L Petrea, Sr. "J.L.", as he was commonly called, who was one hell of a man by the way, had worked his entire life, rearing, supporting, and educating nine children with my mother. Yes, nine. I'm glad they finally reached perfection, or God knows how many of us there would be running around this world now. (I'm the youngest, of course.) He lived a lousy 63 years, and died in July of the year he retired. Seven months, folks. That is how long my father got to "appreciate" his retirement years.

 

No one promises us a tomorrow. No one guarantees us anything past this very moment in time. So, if you are planning your retirement, and you are unsure about the amount you will have to retire on, please do yourself a favor. Think of how many years you have put in, how many years you have worked your fingers to the bone, how many years you have waited for "that" day to come. Don't let anyone or anything get in the way of you living your dream. If you do, you will still be working the day they throw dirt in your face and are buried six feet under the ground. Don't be too scared to take that step to enjoy the remaining days, weeks, months, or years of your life.

 

Thanks for reading,

 

Paul

 

 

 

 

You're right Paul. I have seen many who conked out after a year or two from retirement. Retirement is not for everybody because some are workaholics. But my husband had a good idea when he retired at 55 and he is still enjoying it. And I am enjoying it too.

 

jazzy

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HTM

One important thing is the exchange rate, U.S. dollar goes up and down like a Jojo. $ 1000 may be ok today, but in a few months can mean starvation. I have about $ 3000 in pension that is more than I actually need in RP, but it is good to build up a buffer.

 

I have retired, but I will continue to work a little. This stimulates me both culturally and intellectually. For me, it will give a poorer quality of life if I could not work a little. Fortunately, I can work all over the world. Currently I work in Europe, but soon Im "home" in RP. What I earn for this work I use for travel and charity.

 

My perfect retirement is 1-2 months in Europe, 9 months in the RP and the rest of the time in other countries in Asia. This is my life now.

 

Money is not important, freedom is.

 

Harry

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fanboat
First and foremost, this is no reflection whatsoever, on Volstateguy. He has been on these forums for a very long time, and posts rarely, but posts loudly. An excellent post that he made today, caused me to think of a topic that has come up often over the years.

 

The above quoted text is from the Living off Military Retirement thread. Now, on to my advice.

 

While planning your retirement certainly should be well thought out and planned, each of you need to consider the most important thing. That is, when is enough, really enough? When will you be financially secure enough to take that step and finally retire? When will you have enough to fulfill your retirement years' plans?

 

Over my years in the Philippines, I have met guys from other countries who were planning to take the leap here, to live out their retirement years. Many have communicated with me through my own websites. Yet, others met me through other on line forums or Philippines related Yahoo Groups of which I am associated.

 

Unfortunately, after getting to know some of these guys on a more personal level, usually by having questions asked of me off-line, or a phone call or two through the ol' VOIP phone, I learned that they were too scared to actually stop working. They were nervous about liquidating their lives and moving to a country they had not visited, or had limited contact with in the past. In every single case, there was one common denominator, "I don't think I have enough money to retire yet, Paul." Okay, so when is enough, enough, folks?

 

Each of us has to make that individual decision. For me, I thought about one thing, my father, J.L Petrea, Sr. "J.L.", as he was commonly called, who was one hell of a man by the way, had worked his entire life, rearing, supporting, and educating nine children with my mother. Yes, nine. I'm glad they finally reached perfection, or God knows how many of us there would be running around this world now. (I'm the youngest, of course.) He lived a lousy 63 years, and died in July of the year he retired. Seven months, folks. That is how long my father got to "appreciate" his retirement years.

 

No one promises us a tomorrow. No one guarantees us anything past this very moment in time. So, if you are planning your retirement, and you are unsure about the amount you will have to retire on, please do yourself a favor. Think of how many years you have put in, how many years you have worked your fingers to the bone, how many years you have waited for "that" day to come. Don't let anyone or anything get in the way of you living your dream. If you do, you will still be working the day they throw dirt in your face and are buried six feet under the ground. Don't be too scared to take that step to enjoy the remaining days, weeks, months, or years of your life.

 

Thanks for reading,

 

Paul

 

Paul...If a person has had enought of the routine back home...and truly wants a new life..they need to just do it...you can always return to your old life at anytime...live with your kids and start over before it is too late for the adventure of your life...I think there are too many real old guys here with premium ladys...looks discusting...but the funny thing is this young ladys respect the old guy and joke and smile with him...whats up with that my friend??

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On-in-2
Money is not important, freedom is.

 

Harry

 

I agree with you in essence, Harry, but in the real world, a lack of money is a serious lack of freedom.

 

Well, maybe not freedom, per se, but the number of options you have are severely limited with no money.

 

So, in a sense, money is very important to freedom.

 

 

Cheers

 

Pete of New Hampshire

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Cebuned
Houdini said just one more year, but we know what happened to him. He died before he retired. The post office made an offer of early retirement and I jumped at the chance. That was 2004 and I was only 51. Retire early while you are still alive. I really enjoy my freedom. Yes, my income is reduced but so are my taxes and my level of stress.

I love it...LOL I actually live about 5 buildings away from a building in the center of New Britain CT., were Houdini made one of his most famous escapes, hanging by his ankles, in a straight jacket and locked and tied hands behind him. Hung from a rope 5 storys high, upside down and they set the rope on fire. He didn't die that day...LOL :P

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fanboat
First and foremost, this is no reflection whatsoever, on Volstateguy. He has been on these forums for a very long time, and posts rarely, but posts loudly. An excellent post that he made today, caused me to think of a topic that has come up often over the years.

 

The above quoted text is from the Living off Military Retirement thread. Now, on to my advice.

 

While planning your retirement certainly should be well thought out and planned, each of you need to consider the most important thing. That is, when is enough, really enough? When will you be financially secure enough to take that step and finally retire? When will you have enough to fulfill your retirement years' plans?

 

Over my years in the Philippines, I have met guys from other countries who were planning to take the leap here, to live out their retirement years. Many have communicated with me through my own websites. Yet, others met me through other on line forums or Philippines related Yahoo Groups of which I am associated.

 

Unfortunately, after getting to know some of these guys on a more personal level, usually by having questions asked of me off-line, or a phone call or two through the ol' VOIP phone, I learned that they were too scared to actually stop working. They were nervous about liquidating their lives and moving to a country they had not visited, or had limited contact with in the past. In every single case, there was one common denominator, "I don't think I have enough money to retire yet, Paul." Okay, so when is enough, enough, folks?

 

Each of us has to make that individual decision. For me, I thought about one thing, my father, J.L Petrea, Sr. "J.L.", as he was commonly called, who was one hell of a man by the way, had worked his entire life, rearing, supporting, and educating nine children with my mother. Yes, nine. I'm glad they finally reached perfection, or God knows how many of us there would be running around this world now. (I'm the youngest, of course.) He lived a lousy 63 years, and died in July of the year he retired. Seven months, folks. That is how long my father got to "appreciate" his retirement years.

 

No one promises us a tomorrow. No one guarantees us anything past this very moment in time. So, if you are planning your retirement, and you are unsure about the amount you will have to retire on, please do yourself a favor. Think of how many years you have put in, how many years you have worked your fingers to the bone, how many years you have waited for "that" day to come. Don't let anyone or anything get in the way of you living your dream. If you do, you will still be working the day they throw dirt in your face and are buried six feet under the ground. Don't be too scared to take that step to enjoy the remaining days, weeks, months, or years of your life.

 

Thanks for reading,

 

Paul

 

I had to think about when is enough really enough...here goes...I moved here for a love life that was missing in america...now I find that I am having a problem keeping up...I have to decide to change my routine so I can do a good job in bed...than she wants seconds...and you know that is not easy to do...its not as fun...and seems to be a lot of work to handle....before I had to wait weeks for sex...now too much sex...hell of a change...I guess thats way I show up to work at noon now?

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fanboat
First and foremost, this is no reflection whatsoever, on Volstateguy. He has been on these forums for a very long time, and posts rarely, but posts loudly. An excellent post that he made today, caused me to think of a topic that has come up often over the years.

 

The above quoted text is from the Living off Military Retirement thread. Now, on to my advice.

 

While planning your retirement certainly should be well thought out and planned, each of you need to consider the most important thing. That is, when is enough, really enough? When will you be financially secure enough to take that step and finally retire? When will you have enough to fulfill your retirement years' plans?

 

Over my years in the Philippines, I have met guys from other countries who were planning to take the leap here, to live out their retirement years. Many have communicated with me through my own websites. Yet, others met me through other on line forums or Philippines related Yahoo Groups of which I am associated.

 

Unfortunately, after getting to know some of these guys on a more personal level, usually by having questions asked of me off-line, or a phone call or two through the ol' VOIP phone, I learned that they were too scared to actually stop working. They were nervous about liquidating their lives and moving to a country they had not visited, or had limited contact with in the past. In every single case, there was one common denominator, "I don't think I have enough money to retire yet, Paul." Okay, so when is enough, enough, folks?

 

Each of us has to make that individual decision. For me, I thought about one thing, my father, J.L Petrea, Sr. "J.L.", as he was commonly called, who was one hell of a man by the way, had worked his entire life, rearing, supporting, and educating nine children with my mother. Yes, nine. I'm glad they finally reached perfection, or God knows how many of us there would be running around this world now. (I'm the youngest, of course.) He lived a lousy 63 years, and died in July of the year he retired. Seven months, folks. That is how long my father got to "appreciate" his retirement years.

 

No one promises us a tomorrow. No one guarantees us anything past this very moment in time. So, if you are planning your retirement, and you are unsure about the amount you will have to retire on, please do yourself a favor. Think of how many years you have put in, how many years you have worked your fingers to the bone, how many years you have waited for "that" day to come. Don't let anyone or anything get in the way of you living your dream. If you do, you will still be working the day they throw dirt in your face and are buried six feet under the ground. Don't be too scared to take that step to enjoy the remaining days, weeks, months, or years of your life.

 

Thanks for reading,

 

Paul

 

I am to young to retire...give me some more guan dude?????

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TALCE

It all depends on if you like the work you do?

I was in the Air Force 24 years, retired, but still had two kids in school, so I went back to work.

Now the kids are out of school, but I love my job.

When the day comes that my job becomes work, it

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NoPera

One of the best articles I've read recently on this subject was written by Gary North. I'll pick out my favorite pieces.

 

I have a peculiar definition of "rich." It is easy to understand. I know almost no one who has achieved it.

 

"You are rich when you quit your wage-earning job and pursue your life's top goal without ever drawing a paycheck again."

 

Note: I did not say "when you can afford to quit." I know lots of people who are rich by that definition. But they don't quit. This includes me.

 

The proof of the pudding is in the eating. The proof of riches is to unlock the golden handcuffs, hand them back to their owner, and walk away.

 

But what if you love your job? It pays a lot, you say, but you would be willing to do it for free.

 

Then do it for free.

 

Why?

 

To get rid of the golden handcuffs. Do not depend on them.

 

You may not believe in Peak Oil. You had better believe in Peak Time.

 

People say they need to accumulate money for their old age. They see that Peak Time is behind them. Time is visibly running out. Some day, it may be drooling out. So, they keep on the golden handcuffs.

 

Was Mother Teresa poor or rich? Rich. She ran a huge operation from a little building in India, using a manual typewriter. I know this for a fact. I once received a letter from her. She did not trade her heartbeats for a salary. She wore no golden handcuffs.

 

If you're still working and not doing something you love you're trading heartbeats for wages.

 

Have a nice day!

 

p.s. The entire article can be read HERE

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beach

Fanboat, I am sure you are keeping up just fine. If you really love someone (especially a filipina), they will love you back like no other on the planet. I have not found any woman here, not satisfied with one good...ummmm round (so to speak). I find women here have much less trouble getting satisfied than their counterparts from where we came from. Less hangups. Can't speak for all but that has been my experience.

 

Retiring early (although I don't intentionally consider myself such...just my bank account thinks so) is good. The issue is that once money will eventually run low, there is a stress that comes along with that. That stress can be as much pressure as the old job you finally got rid of; that was "killing" you. My advice is to do some amount of planning on how to deal with inflation.

 

Making money here locally, unless you are experienced in running some type of business that is somewhat inflation proof, is fairly difficult. Running a business here and selling to 1st world countries makes much more sense. I find that price is too much of a factor here. People would much rather buy say 5 umbrellas a year at P100 each, than fork out P350 for one that will last 2 years. Go figure. In other words, they overlook quality in buying products, (except cell phones/cars since it is a status symbol here) just to hear the jingle of some pesos left in their pocket, after a transaction.

 

It used to be far less expensive to live here than it is now. Food costs have doubled in the last five years. The pricing on things that ordinary locals buy is not bad but say, a jar of salsa? They know who is buying it now and have priced it for the expat market here.

 

So my point is, throwing caution to the wind is dangerous. I have seen friends of mine come, live the high life and go faster than they thought, because they ran out of money. They leave for a year and come back with some money to try and do it again but the costs have gone up (in that year they were gone) and had to leave again. Next time they come back, the rents are higher. So plan out some type of income. Typical marketing you may be well experienced in from where you came and competing with product qualities, may not yield you what one might expect in this local economy. Not everyone's experience will be the same yet, I think it is something to think about before making the "jump". Do have, a backup plan.

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Cipro

Unfortunately I have some real debt I have to pay off, not a lot, but it's real and it's not secured by anything I can liquidate. I have less than 2 years left and my slavery to that debt will be over. Above that, there are a few small things but nothing too terrible, and for the last 2 years I've been cultivating a much different view on life. I've gotten rid of my $5000 a month mortgage, I have one simple car, and things like that. I'm rebuilding my savings at a good rate and I have some investments that are doing well. So while I'm not "there" yet, I'm on the road and traveling.

 

Just hope my map is good.

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