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When is enough, really enough?

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Bob in Iligan
4 minutes ago, Salty Dog said:

Is that even if you're living in the Philippines? 

Getting doctors and hospitals there to accept insurance instead of cash can be problematic at best. There is a good chance that even if your insurance pays, that you might have to pay out of your own pocket upfront. 

I had to pay over $30,000 up front.  My insurance paid me back after a few months. A sizable nest egg is a necessity. 

That is such an important question, my goodness I didn't think of it when I took that job, I was in my 20's. 

My insurer has a special program for overseas.   They're real aggressive about getting hospitals to accept payment and if not, getting the money to you.  Finding providers.   Air lift off Mt. Everest.  Funeral stuff, shipping bodies, it's pretty amazing coverage.   

My plan, for anything that needs reimbursement, is to rack up airline miles. They take credit cards at hospitals and I've used them.   30K is half an international round trip, so I need two of those a year, lol.   

 

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Headshot
1 hour ago, Bob in Iligan said:

That is such an important question, my goodness I didn't think of it when I took that job, I was in my 20's. 

My insurer has a special program for overseas.   They're real aggressive about getting hospitals to accept payment and if not, getting the money to you.  Finding providers.   Air lift off Mt. Everest.  Funeral stuff, shipping bodies, it's pretty amazing coverage.   

My plan, for anything that needs reimbursement, is to rack up airline miles. They take credit cards at hospitals and I've used them.   30K is half an international round trip, so I need two of those a year, lol.  

Where you are planning to live, the funeral stuff and body shipping parts of your insurance policy will probably be the most valuable parts. The chances that you will make it to a decent medical facility, if you have a major medical problem, are very small.

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Bob in Iligan
2 hours ago, Headshot said:

Where you are planning to live, the funeral stuff and body shipping parts of your insurance policy will probably be the most valuable parts. The chances that you will make it to a decent medical facility, if you have a major medical problem, are very small.

 My insurance company uses Philjets Group in the Philippines.   It's an air ambulance.  They fly to Chong Hua Hospital in Cebu.  

There's an emergency number on my insurance card for overseas.   They call the chopper.   Not an ordinary chopper but one they call an "Emergency Room in the Air".   They bring the staff to you.  

That's pretty crazy, but all I have to do is get to the pier.

Realistically, it's a couple of hours I would think. From the call to the chopper landing with an emergency staff.  It's only a hundred miles.  

So if I run out of ice cream, I'll be able to hang on.   I'll hear dispatch saying the chopper is in the air.  With chocolate and vanilla.  It's going to be soft enough to scoop perfectly on arrival. 

So you know, survival odds are better than you would think.  

 

 

 

 

 

Edited by Bob in Iligan

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Jawny
21 minutes ago, Bob in Iligan said:

 My insurance company uses Philjets Group in the Philippines.   It's an air ambulance.  They fly to Chong Hua Hospital in Cebu.  

There's an emergency number on my insurance card for overseas.   They call the chopper.   Not an ordinary chopper but one they call an "Emergency Room in the Air".   They bring the staff to you.  

That's pretty crazy, but all I have to do is get to the pier.

Realistically, it's a couple of hours I would think. From the call to the chopper landing with an emergency staff.  It's only a hundred miles.  

So if I run out of ice cream, I'll be able to hang on.   I'll hear dispatch saying the chopper is in the air.  With chocolate and vanilla.  It's going to be soft enough to scoop perfectly on arrival. 

So you know, survival odds are better than you would think.  

 

 

 

 

 

It’s good to have a plan A.  However, I’d be cautious about expecting good results from an air ambulance service.  Even simple road ambulance service is quite limited, and that is likely what would be called in the event of a typical emergency.  

The only helicopter emergency service in our area I know of in recent years involved getting the local electrical utilities helicopter to agree to transport a patient to Cebu. No air ambulance, just a flight.

Even with an insurance policy that pays the cost, and a contact number, there's  no assurance Mother Nature will cooperate or that the crew is available.  

I'm not trying to be doom and gloom about the concept, but medical emergencies in many areas, even cities, can be far less than what a westerner would expect. 

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Headshot

I must admit that I am very surprised that there appears to be some sort of air ambulance service in the Cebu metro area (although their advertising doesn't actually say they have any helicopters available on Cebu and their phone numbers are all US numbers). I didn't even know that Chong Hua had a helipad (on the roof) until I checked it on Google Maps. The only helicopters I have ever seen here are army birds and private aircraft (owned by very rich Filipinos). I have NEVER seen a life flight type helicopter here, either in the air or on the ground. I wonder why that is? With as bad as ground ambulances are here, one would think there is a marketing opportunity for an air ambulance service (if there actually is such a thing). I would think it would be good to do some further checking before simply assuming that there will be helicopters waiting for your call.

 http://www.globalairrescue.com/airports/air-ambulance-lapu-lapu-mactan-cebu-international-airport-noprpvm.php

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Bob in Iligan
28 minutes ago, Jawny said:

It’s good to have a plan A.  However, I’d be cautious about expecting good results from an air ambulance service.  Even simple road ambulance service is quite limited, and that is likely what would be called in the event of a typical emergency.  

The only helicopter emergency service in our area I know of in recent years involved getting the local electrical utilities helicopter to agree to transport a patient to Cebu. No air ambulance, just a flight.

Even with an insurance policy that pays the cost, and a contact number, there's  no assurance Mother Nature will cooperate or that the crew is available.  

I'm not trying to be doom and gloom about the concept, but medical emergencies in many areas, even cities, can be far less than what a westerner would expect. 

Well logically my friend we call this the fallacy of personal incredulity.  The company is Philjets.   The only people who know about this kind of insurance are people who have it.   I do.   Executives do.  Government people.  Wealthy people.   They sell that insurance on their website.  

Sure, some things in the Philippines don't work.   Like the mail.   That's why you use LBC.   And they get the job done fine.  Same here.   This is a private company, not the government.  

It isn't that my expectations are wrong, I have been running around the Philippines for 16 years now, married the last 10 and with a house here.  So I understand the infuriating stupidity, incompetence, and corruption.   Like with the post office.   But not in a lot of things.   Like medical in places like Cebu or Manila.  Right? 

I can always say Cebu isn't good enough, and I imagine people on this forum hear that from people in the US who don't know.   They hear people being skeptical about the kind of medical care you can get in Cebu, Philippines.  But the truth is, if you have even just modest means - the medical care in Cebu is just fine.  Dental.  Vision.  

As a friendly point I think we see life a little differently.   I've shot five bears so far, trying to do me in.   I could go on a long list of things about how different our lives are but I think that sums it up pretty nicely.   Totaled two airplanes.   Sank a boat.  Not being a bad driver, but just being in conditions a person like you would be mortified over. I called it being "in the teeth of it".   On Mt. McKinley at thirty below in winds > 100 mph.   Bring it on.  

This Daram thing, real tame.   I boat here, and there is no place you can go: 100% of the waters will kill you with hypothermia.  It's a question of how much time you have to live.   One of my hunting buddies died in front of his wife and kids, on a public beach, just from turning over a canoe and having to swim ashore.  They waited at first, which was a fatal mistake.   By minutes.  The fat guy lived, that's why we like it up here for cold weather survival.  

When you go in the waters off Samar - you are basking in comfort.   My God, the salt water makes you float!   So much easier than the freshwater here, to swim.   My life risks are coming way down in a move from here to Philippines.  

Hey - it just occurs to me that there is one place it isn't true about western expectations.   Alaska!   You are going to find this hard to believe but cell phone and internet are better for me in the Philippines.  

 

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Bob in Iligan
24 minutes ago, Headshot said:

I must admit that I am very surprised that there appears to be some sort of air ambulance service in the Cebu metro area (although their advertising doesn't actually say they have any helicopters available on Cebu and their phone numbers are all US numbers). I didn't even know that Chong Hua had a helipad (on the roof) until I checked it on Google Maps. The only helicopters I have ever seen here are army birds and private aircraft (owned by very rich Filipinos). I have NEVER seen a life flight type helicopter here, either in the air or on the ground. I wonder why that is? With as bad as ground ambulances are here, one would think there is a marketing opportunity for an air ambulance service (if there actually is such a thing). I would think it would be good to do some further checking before simply assuming that there will be helicopters waiting for your call.

 http://www.globalairrescue.com/airports/air-ambulance-lapu-lapu-mactan-cebu-international-airport-noprpvm.php

I can help in a couple respects   My airplane mechanic ran the life-flight service shop and I was in there a lot.   These emergency aircraft have a home base that is out of the way of everyone else, maybe even their own airstrip.   So you don't see them much unless you happened to be there when a chopper was, for a few minutes, landing someone on top of the hospital.   You'd never see one of their planes or choppers at an airport unless you had a reason for going there, like I did.  A medevac plane, nor chopper - they aren't going to meet a patient at airport passenger operations.  

They only deploy remotely so you wouldn't have a reason to see one deployed.   This just doesn't surprise me at all. You hang out in the city or where ambulances can be deployed.   They are parked at the hospital, and are dispatched from there.   Do you see a lot of submarines?   Well, they have them in the Philippines and they're in places you don't frequent.  A friendly point, no disrespect meant.  

I knew about Cebu because I inquired with my insurance company.  They told me about Chong Hua.  The insurance company said they just keep up with whoever the contractors are that do this sort of thing.  It could be one company this year and someone else next year.   

So that's how I know this sort of thing is pretty low profile, and would surprise you.   I don't think my insurance company is lying.  They told me they pull the plug at $2 million.   Up to that, they're going to go to a lot of expense to try saving me.  

You just confirmed the heliport.  I call a US number, that's right.  From the Philippines.  They, in turn, run this whole international emergency services department.   

I'm always open minded, and if I am in error here and my insurance company is wrong - I'm still living on a remote island anyway.   lol.   

 

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