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When is enough, really enough?


Paul

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Paul

 

 

Edit: Damn didn't realize how old this post was oh well.

 

It's okay. Alan is considerably older now, but still alive and well - and quite a bit uglier, from what I hear. (He's older than dirt.) If / When he sees your reply, he will probably post a reply again.

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SkyMan

 

 

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Is that the latest fad 'study?'  Master's students are always looking for anything out of main stream in order to get points for 'innovative thinking' even if it is wrong.  My personal experience is what I go by and not some fad.  Losing weight is simple, diet and exercise.  That's actually the easy way to do it.  Libraries upon libraries of books have been written about how to lose weight.  A real waste of forests.  And my opinion on cardio is the opposite.  20 minutes is the minimum.  I don't bother lacing my running shoes for less than 25 minutes.

 

And as for fads, they used to say women shouldn't run marathons because their uterus would fall out. :rofl:  I can't tell you the number of times I've almost fallen at the end of marathons having to dodge ejected uteruses (uteri?)

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This is a good subject. I never plan on retiring, not because I can't but because I enjoy working. My wife and I worked our butts off buying and rehabbing rental property in the states. We now have a nice income in addition to social security and a small VA disability. We could live off the rental income if the other went away, that is the way we planned it and so far so good. I love the Philippines but there are a number of things I miss but hey it's just another day in paradise.

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BossHog1

i agree with Paul 100%,your tomorrow may never come

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Marko 64

I was forced to retire,due to a serious neck injury at work,at 45,thankfully i was insured,and after 2 years a lump sum compensation was agreed on,the nature of the injury prevents me from doing most work,which is frustrating,i have some others investments and a small private pension fund,which due to age restrictions i will be able to access later this year,i will not be living like a king but will have enough to get by. I had a successful business,which i sold,but to be honest i never thought i would be in this position at this age,now in my early fifties, it does have it's benefits,as i have decided after 4 years to relocate from Thailand to the Philippines and i would think it is easier at this age than if i were a lot older. However on the flip side i do worry that once the remainder of the lump sum is exhausted which at some point it will be,things will be a bit tight.

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I believe here in Australia if you are born after 1952 the retiring age is 67 to get the aged pension, also talk id it might be 70 in the near future so it a good idea to put extra money a side, I am 70 this year still working part time and enjoying it, sure I considered moving to Ph to retire however better off here no family to bleed off me, my wife younger than me she enjoys it here, we still get time to travel twice a year, also medical here is better off than Ph, as a number said here many foreigners once they get there they drink all the time start looking very old.

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Am 66 still working,I have enough to retire,but have wife and two kids to set up.

Am thinking of slowing down,maybe go to sea 4 months a year.

Hopefully I will live long,maybe die in a bungy jumping accident at 104:)

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mikewright

I tell ya, I just hear so many guys saying, "Just one more year and I will retire." Well, a friend of mine kept saying that, until he died before he had a chance to retire. I didn't let it happen to me, and I hope others heed this information and advice too.

 

Yep, it's a gamble.There's always two sides of a coin.

 

If you can afford to retire early, why wouldn't you?

 

If you can't afford to, why would you?

 

If you don't know how much you will need to finance your retirement for the rest of your life, or don't have enough to cover contingencies, but still want to retire, it's a gamble. Some people have a great retirement and die early while they still have funds, others not so lucky live their last years in poverty. And it depends a lot on how much you need to live comfortably.

 

There's no "right" answer, but you can usually pick the people who gambled and lost.

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arentol

 

 

No one promises us a tomorrow. No one guarantees us anything past this very moment in time. So, if you are planning your retirement, and you are unsure about the amount you will have to retire on, please do yourself a favor. Think of how many years you have put in, how many years you have worked your fingers to the bone, how many years you have waited for "that" day to come. Don't let anyone or anything get in the way of you living your dream. If you do, you will still be working the day they throw dirt in your face and are buried six feet under the ground. Don't be too scared to take that step to enjoy the remaining days, weeks, months, or years of your life.

 

Great thoughts and I absolutely agree. I'd only add that the hesitation you've described is not only relegated to the mature near-retirement-age crowd. I've found it to be pervasive amongst young people as well, whom you'd think would be the most likely to hop on a plane for a new adventure.

 

I met my wife in my early 30s. At the time, my office mates learned of my upcoming trip to the Philippines to meet my fiancee. Invariably the conversation would start with the generalized topic of international travel. My colleagues would always lament, "Wow, I wish I could do that..." (i.e., travel overseas -- just travel... not even migrating) and these were people in their mid-20s to mid-30s. I'd always ask, "Why not? What's stopping you from travelling?" and they'd reply with a long list of petty excuses... busy, scared, too expensive, etc. At that moment, I could really understand why so few Americans even own a passport.

 

Of course the topic of migrating overseas usually elicits a more emotional response, often along the lines of, "Are you crazy?" and "Do they have electricity there?" Plenty of ignorance, to be sure.

 

I suppose my point is that if this level of trepidation is so prevalent among the youth, then how much more so among seniors? At the end of the day, as Paul said, we don't know how much time we have left. All the excuses in the world are usually petty substitutes for the true reason: fear.

 

 

Aren

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Paul

 

 

however better off here no family to bleed off me

 

How much a family "bleeds" off you, isn't up to them. It's up to you. And, family anywhere can do it. They don't have to be Filipinos.

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However on the flip side i do worry that once the remainder of the lump sum is exhausted which at some point it will be,things will be a bit tight.

 

Just remember to ALWAYS have an exit plan. If it looks like the money won't last, go back to your home country. There is no welfare program in the Philippines for those that run out of funds. Never let your funds get so low that you can't afford to get home. That would be the biggest mistake you could possibly make. Set money aside just for that eventuality that you won't touch under ANY circumstances. Otherwise, it will just disappear with the daily expenses of living.

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TheWhiteKnight

I'm longing to retire, moved here at 31, already living part of the life, but still I hate having to work or answer to anyone (online work) I want to solve that by age 40 and focus on stuff I actually care about. My pinay is happy to take over bread winner role (I hooked her up with a job paying USD), hope she still feels that way when were able. House almost paid for, about to get the SRRV, then relaxing and working on hobbies. I hope.

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Monsoon

It's never enough...

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guitartechk

I'm counting down guys, the wife's immigration plus 3 years and I'm outta Maryland to the land of fish & tuba (and good ole San Mig Light!) Could go sooner, but I want the wife to have a blue passport!

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profits101

as I have been hauling stuff out of the house and getting rid of it - once week into a really oversize trash can that gets picked up each week (yes I recycle what I can) - I ask myself... what did I put in the trash can a couple weeks ago? Even if I can remember, I'm not in love with it, and it didn't keep me warm at night, or smile back at me. I'll probably have a few memories of the job I'm walking away from too, but most of those will just be negative - George Constanza "Oh I should've said THAT to him!!!!" It's easier for me to let go, as some here have noted, since I've moved across the country and lived in several regions over the past 30 years. In the same way I asked myself, will I live my life differently for the sake of those who might say..."She's sooooooo young..." Nope. So... totally agree, overthinking a move like this is a prescription for a compromised and comfortable existence, and good luck to those. In the end, I think the self-selection process simply takes hold, and off you go... some will just never get to that point.

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