Jump to content

When is enough, really enough?


Paul

Recommended Posts

bmoore

I'm so glad that I don't have a wife, kids or a mortgage. I can save $1000 a month in cash and sock away $23K per year in my retirement funds. When I'm ready to finally escape to the Philippines, I can just pack up and go.

Remember there is alot more to life than retirement. Do not put your life on hold while waiting. Enjoy the moment. Edited by bmoore
  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Replies 276
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

  • Paul

    18

  • fanboat

    10

  • mikewright

    9

  • Headshot

    9

Top Posters In This Topic

Popular Posts

First and foremost, this is no reflection whatsoever, on Volstateguy. He has been on these forums for a very long time, and posts rarely, but posts loudly. An excellent post that he made today, caused

I do wonder about you people sometimes. I went through a totally shit schooling in North Wales, run by socialists.   I joined the Army at 16. I left after 10 years. No trade, no money, no real exp

Having recently pulled the trigger on retirement at the age of 55. I have been working into retirement by working less and less hours. By working less and less hours I learned how to live on less. The

Posted Images

Personally, I don't want to retire. I really enjoy my work and hope that I can continue working until I drop.

 

That being said, I "semi" retired to the Philippines about 10 years ago after visiting the Philippines for 15 years prior. I had no fixed assets, so it was easy for me to move to the Philippines. I first moved to Caloocan City, NCR and after some years there, moved to Mactan Island.

 

I am very happy with the quality of my life now. I am still able to work at the job I enjoy and only have to work 2 or 3 days a month (although I work more) to make much more than I need to live on for a month. The extra income that I do not readily need is securely invested in the Philippines, Singapore and Australia.

 

The best decision I ever made was to down-scale my business and get out of Australia. The life stress of living in Australia was leading me to an early grave there. In the Philippines, there is so much less stress for me.

 

Life is good for me in the Philippines!

Edited by PIM
  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites
NOSOCALPINOY
Just my own life's short scenario about how, what and when I was able to retire when I did.

In my early years in the USAF at the age of 18, I was very observant of the many people around me in their daily duties including civilian employees. I asked myself, I wonder how much more do these DOD civilian employees make vs those receiving military depending on one's rank or civilian position. 

I was in a career field that was stagnant with no upward mobility to go up in rank, since there were already to many chiefs and not enough Indians. So, I continued my military career for the first 12 years, until I got an opportunity to improve my salary doing the same job I was trained to do, but in a combined Civil Service and Military Reservist capacity called the Air Reserves Technician Program (ART). The combine pay was good though and I was still able to go on short 2 week annual tours overseas with my USAFR unit. however during Desert Storm/Shield I assigned at our Forward Operations Base (FOB) in the West coast in support of our troops in the Middle East. 

With a combination of 12 yrs active duty and 18 yrs with Civil Service, I took an early retirement at age 49 with 30 yrs of service during the Clinton administration Base Closures and Manpower Reduction, but they gave me a 6 yr penalty pension wise. Even with the 6 yr penalty, I recouped it all back after 11 yrs living in the Philippines, but it didn't stop there, at age 60 my Reserve military pension kicked in and I started to collect my SSA at age 62, tripling my previous single pension since the age of 49!

I didn't plan my retirement, it all just fell in place after we took a leap of faith when we sold everything before moving to the Philippines when the cost of living was still low. 

We are now pretty much set in our ways and still enjoying our retirement lifestyle here in the Philippines since 1998.

  • Like 7
Link to post
Share on other sites
NOSOCALPINOY

I'm so glad that I don't have a wife, kids or a mortgage. I can save $1000 a month in cash and sock away $23K per year in my retirement funds. When I'm ready to finally escape to the Philippines, I can just pack up and go.

We've been retired now here in the Philippines since I was 50 yrs old. I'm 66 now and in good health "knock on wood", with a loving wife at a young 50 yrs old, but we had no kids - wife has enough nieces and nephews she considers her own, mortgage paid off and I drive a 1979 Red Toyota Corolla that's on her last legs and we are able to live on just on 1/3 of my U.S. Government pensions. I didn't even plan my retirement, we just got rid of everything we owned in the U.S. with no money in the bank, but it all just fell into place when we took a leap of faith and moved here to the Philippines on my initial small civil service pension (where did I read that before? Look up! Ops! Brain fart already, sorry!) and on a thin wing and a prayer. Just lucky I guess or I made all of the right simple common sense decisions in my entire young adult life!

Anyway, "life is what we all make it to be"! "Different strokes for different folks"!

Edited by NOSOCALPINOY
Link to post
Share on other sites
JollyJim

After almost 42 years I will retire at the end of this month, I will take home more then than I do now because I won't have to pay into railroad retirement, union dues and  state taxes.

I was going to move to Cebu but now thinking its nicer to visit instead.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
Paul

 

 

I was going to move to Cebu but now thinking its nicer to visit instead.

 

You should have a spare bedroom, right? 

I'll be right over. :D

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
lamoe

I'm glad there are people who don't ever want to retire. I think it's a great choice for THEM. By them staying in the work force, it just makes more people paying into the system to keep it afloat for those of us who are enjoying our retirements. Those of us who refuse to die in the harness salute those who think dying in the harness is the way to go. Three cheers for all of the people who can't see themselves ever retiring.

 

:oldtimer:  :oldtimer:  :oldtimer:

 

I was one of those who truly loved what they did and made a decent living with outstanding bennies doing it  - travel, car, free med / dental, etc., helping my customers solve unique problems.

 

I wasn't really planning on retiring but it was made easy for me - was 63 - a level 3 salesman with great territory when company started downsizing sales force even though we'd tripled total sales in 5 years (hit expected market share)  - my area times 6. Went from 89 to 12 in 2 years - I was the last of the original hires. Replaced with a level 1 kid at less than half my comp. They'd saturated the market then trimmed to a more realistic number.

 

At 63 the most honest comment I received during an interview was "You're perfect, just what we're looking for, but the boss is concerned about how long you'd stay."

 

In a way best thing that ever happened to me. Thanks to initial planning both my wife and I will have enough  - her here  - me there.

 

Now all that's left is to find someone to buy this place them  can get wife settled into her condo and me find a place there.

Link to post
Share on other sites
ubercoder

it's funny how we can justify anything with an example, even if those examples are the exceptions.  There must have been dozens of stories in here where they knew someone who died close to or just after retirement, but I'm betting deep down, you all know these are not the norms, otherwise, US Social Security system would be solvent past 2030.  And the other argument that you don't know what tomorrow brings is also a blind spot.   Sure there's no guarantee that tomorrow the sun will rise in the east, but if I'm a betting man, that's where it will come up.  So yeah, most of you will see your 70s and you will still have to spend on basic things plus probably some additional things like medicine and pleasure robots.  Oh yeah, you'll pay more for them tomorrow(except gas..boy did I call that one wrong, i never thought I'd see $2/gallon gas in my lifetime again.)

 

Seems to me quite a few you fall into the same trap on a thing that was recently invented, "retirement."  Like it's some magical/happy event that happens and everything transforms from you being unhappy worker to a free, do as you like individual.  I have news for you.  If you're unhappy now, when you 'retire', maybe you'll be less miserable and have lower stress/blood pressure, but that happiness meter will barely move.  But I don't expect you believe me, so here's science for you.  

 

http://www.drugabuse.gov/publications/addiction-science/why-do-people-abuse-drugs/natural-rewards-stimulate-dopamine-neurotransmission

 

Amphetamine, ...so if you've ever had a good steak or mind blowing sex before...multiply that by 10x and that's what being on drugs is like.  So, forget your Filipina or house by the beach, wait until 50 55 or 62 to stop working.  Find a work that will support your drug habit until you die and you will never be lonely.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
Paul

 

 

So, forget your Filipina or house by the beach, wait until 50 55 or 62 to stop working.

 

I disagree. If you are able to stop before then, by all means do so. I did - considerably before those ages.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
sugbu777

I am retiring January 2016. I already started the ball rolling as to paperwork etc at my job. I had thought about working one more year and said to myself...what for. That one year might be miserable. I'd rather spend time with my wife and visiting our grandkids.

Edited by sugbu777
  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
littlejohn

It is strange (or perhaps not) how peoples ideas differ.

 

I didnt want to retire, but did so, then went back to working again, as I enjoy it.

I plan to keep on as long as I possibly can.

 

OK, I have cut back on the hours I do, and pick and choose what I want to do (easy when you work for yourself), but I dont plan to give up until I really have to.

 

Completely different outlook obviously, myself I see working for someone else as either temporary or giving up. Owning my own business on the other hand, never plan to completely quit if I can help it.

 

John

 

Edit: Damn didn't realize how old this post was oh well.

Edited by littlejohn
Link to post
Share on other sites
lamoe

A little off-topic but germane to a comment about living into 70"s and when is enough?  

 

In the middle ages the life expectancy was about 40 - but that is really BS - if you made it into adulthood you stood a good chance of reaching 60"s.

 

Childbirth and infant deaths do a real number on avg life expectancy.

 

Better is percentage of deaths per age bracket - 0 / 5, 6 / 12, 13./ 20 etc.

 

I figure I have 7 maybe 10 really good years left (read what you will about what good means) -  67 now - given that time span I can live there like a real millionaire not a vacation one.

Link to post
Share on other sites
bargeman

it can take years in the current real estate climate to sell a 20 mil house :D or even a 2 mil one

Rent them out and live off the income.

Link to post
Share on other sites
philuk

We've been retired now here in the Philippines since I was 50 yrs old. I'm 66 now and in good health "knock on wood", with a loving wife at a young 50 yrs old, but we had no kids - wife has enough nieces and nephews she considers her own, mortgage paid off and I drive a 1979 Red Toyota Corolla that's on her last legs and we are able to live on just on 1/3 of my U.S. Government pensions. I didn't even plan my retirement, we just got rid of everything we owned in the U.S. with no money in the bank, but it all just fell into place when we took a leap of faith and moved here to the Philippines on my initial small civil service pension (where did I read that before? Look up! Ops! Brain fart already, sorry!) and on a thin wing and a prayer. Just lucky I guess or I made all of the right simple common sense decisions in my entire young adult life!

Anyway, "life is what we all make it to be"! "Different strokes for different folks"!

 

appear to be having problems with youe adding noso,   where do you get 17 years in the philippines, if you moved there at 50 and are now 66,   just curious

Link to post
Share on other sites
NOSOCALPINOY

Appear to be having problems with your adding NOSOCALPINOY.  Where do you get 17 years in the Philippines, if you moved there at 50 and are now 66? Just curious!

I'll be 67 in a few months, 50+17 = 67. Close enough ain't it? So, what's a few months off from 66?

 

You seem to appear having problems with your spelling, punctuation and exclamation points, so I corrected it.

 

I maybe weak with my arithmetic, but not so with my English grammar IMHO and I wasn't even born in the U.S.!

 

Ah the fine educational system in the U.S., but I was never a math whiz like my older brother was, who majored in math in college, who did all of my math homework during my high school days and I still passed with a D grade score!

I may only have a high school diploma, but to return to the OP, we are doing well in our retirement lifestyle in the Philippines with my adequate retirement income.   :good:  

Edited by NOSOCALPINOY
Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use, Privacy Policy and Guidelines. We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue..