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San Pedro, Leyte 5.9 Earthquake felt in Cebu July 10 @ 0941


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lamoe
3 minutes ago, Alfred E. Neuman said:

 

The building management doesn‘t trust their own building.

Make sure all valuables locked up?

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Alfred E. Neuman
8 hours ago, lamoe said:

Make sure all valuables locked up?

Make sure Mikala still on the fifteenth floor.

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Aerosick
3 hours ago, tommax said:

In Cebu City I was in loft and felt it, wife was downstairs and didn't even notice it.

We were both in our 24th Floor condo in Horizons 101 and felt nothing!!!

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Felt it in Banawa, near Paseo Arcenas but much weaker than the big one a few days ago. Don't know if others have the same experience but I kind of hear the quakes coming. This morning was working on my laptop and 2-3 seconds before I felt the actual quake I heard or felt what I guess may be the pressure wave.

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lamoe
2 minutes ago, PeteHK said:

Felt it in Banawa, near Paseo Arcenas but much weaker than the big one a few days ago. Don't know if others have the same experience but I kind of hear the quakes coming. This morning was working on my laptop and 2-3 seconds before I felt the actual quake I heard or felt what I guess may be the pressure wave.

I noticed if sitting in my office chair (spring loaded) much more detectable than standing

20 L water bottle great way to verify

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Kabisay-an gid
1 hour ago, liquido said:

 I know we are all prone but it sure seems like Leyte gets its share of disasters with Typhoons,earthquakes and what have you.

Not really. This most recent earthquake was the first one in many years with an epicenter in Leyte.

The last typhoon to make landfall in Leyte was Yolanda in November 2013.

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Woolf
11 minutes ago, PeteHK said:

Felt it in Banawa, near Paseo Arcenas but much weaker than the big one a few days ago. Don't know if others have the same experience but I kind of hear the quakes coming. This morning was working on my laptop and 2-3 seconds before I felt the actual quake I heard or felt what I guess may be the pressure wave.

I do not think you hear anything before you feel it

Sound propagate at about 0.340 km per second

Seismic waves propagates at 2 to 8 km per second

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Speed_of_sound

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seismic_wave 

 

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Alfred E. Neuman
8 hours ago, lamoe said:

I noticed if sitting in my office chair (spring loaded) much more detectable than standing

20 L water bottle great way to verify

Perhaps a few more waves in that bottle you can detect a tsunami.

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samatm
2 hours ago, Kabisay-an gid said:

Not really. This most recent earthquake was the first one in many years with an epicenter in Leyte.

The last typhoon to make landfall in Leyte was Yolanda in November 2013.

you forget when Ormoc got wiped off the map in 1991.. 5k dead.    when was that landslide in so leyte that took out a village..  2005?...   Palompon was flattend by US bombings in WW2.   What else.. im sure there are more.    Ya .. i think Leyte gets her fair share of misery. 

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Kabisay-an gid
5 minutes ago, samatm said:

you forget when Ormoc got wiped off the map in 1991.. 5k dead.    when was that landslide in so leyte that took out a village..  2005?...   Palompon was flattend by US bombings in WW2.   What else.. im sure there are more.    Ya .. i think Leyte gets her fair share of misery. 

I was clearly referring specifically to typhoons and earthquakes.

I believe Liquido was referring to fairly recent natural disasters, I don't believe he was thinking about WWII bombings.

The 1991 flooding wasn't caused by a typhoon, and I'm not the least bit worried about something that happened 26 years ago. Don't live in a flood zone, and you don't have to worry about flooding.

As far as the Saint Bernard, Southern Leyte mudslide - it's not too bright to build a school at the base of a mountain ridge in a country known for heavy rainfall and land/mudslides. Very sad indeed, but it was the only mudslide of such deadly proportions in Leyte in this millennium, so I'm not losing any sleep worrying about the next one.

One minor earthquake, one major mudslide, and one major typhoon in Leyte in this millennium. Way fewer natural disasters than many provinces in Luzon.

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Shall we say that Marawi is far better than disaster-prone Leyte?

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Mandingo
6 hours ago, samatm said:

you forget when Ormoc got wiped off the map in 1991.. 5k dead.    

My wife grew up in the mountains but was staying in Brgy San Antonio going to High School when the flood happened, she climbed a tree with her two younger sisters and they tied themselves with rope to the tree to survive the flood. Ormoc is always getting hit with something. 

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samatm
36 minutes ago, Mandingo said:

My wife grew up in the mountains but was staying in Brgy San Antonio going to High School when the flood happened, she climbed a tree with her two younger sisters and they tied themselves with rope to the tree to survive the flood. Ormoc is always getting hit with something. 

after the 91Ormoc mudslide, my wife accompanied her mother to get in line for free food stuffs from  red Cross... to get to the goodies they had to traverse a trail that with passed by stacks of human corpses waiting for mass burial.   She said that memory is cleary etched into her brain along with the smells of decay.  

 

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samatm
7 hours ago, Kabisay-an gid said:

I was clearly referring specifically to typhoons and earthquakes.

I believe Liquido was referring to fairly recent natural disasters, I don't believe he was thinking about WWII bombings.

The 1991 flooding wasn't caused by a typhoon, and I'm not the least bit worried about something that happened 26 years ago. Don't live in a flood zone, and you don't have to worry about flooding.

As far as the Saint Bernard, Southern Leyte mudslide - it's not too bright to build a school at the base of a mountain ridge in a country known for heavy rainfall and land/mudslides. Very sad indeed, but it was the only mudslide of such deadly proportions in Leyte in this millennium, so I'm not losing any sleep worrying about the next one.

One minor earthquake, one major mudslide, and one major typhoon in Leyte in this millennium. Way fewer natural disasters than many provinces in Luzon.

Seems the press tends to disagree with ya.  

MANILA, Philippines – A magnitude 6.5 earthquake struck Leyte province Thursday afternoon, July 6, which left at least two people dead and a hundred injured.

According to the Philippine Institute of Volcanology and Seismology (Phivolcs), the epicenter of the quake, which hit at 4:03 pm, was near Ormoc City.

On Friday, July 7, the province continued to experience aftershocks while authorities assessed the extent of the damage. (READ: Fear, panic as aftershocks rock Leyte)

Leyte is one of the 6 provinces in Eastern Visayas. With a land area of 7,368 km², it is considered one of the biggest provinces in the region.

It also has the biggest population with 1.73 million in 2015 and is considered as the fastest-growing province in the region – with an average annual population growth rate of 1.83% from 2010 to 2015.

According to a study by Phivolcs in 2014, a segment of the Philippine Fault called the Central Leyte Fault traverses the province. Leyte also has 18 volcanoes but only one, Cancajanag volcano, is active.

Disasters over the years

Prior to this earthquake, Leyte has had its share of disasters over the years.

Perhaps the earliest account of a disaster hitting the province was through a scientific study published by Fr. Jose Algue, S.J. of the Observatorio de Manila. The typhoon which devastated Leyte in October 1897 left more than 400 people dead. (READ: Flashback: 1897, Leyte and a strong typhoon)

The typhoon was considered “among the most violent that traversed the Philippine archipelago” given that it was 5 times worse than the typhoon of October 1882 which affected Southern Luzon.

Almost a century later, Leyte was hit again by what is considered as the second deadliest typhoon in Philippine history. On November 5, 1991, torrential rains brought by Typhoon Uring (Thelma) caused rivers to overflow – triggering flash floods. (READ: Worst natural disasters in the Philippines)

At least 4,000 people died in the massive flooding with about 3,000 people injured and about 2,500 reported missing after the floods. Majority of the victims were residents of Ormoc City. (LOOK BACK: The 1991 flash flood that devastated Ormoc City)

A report by the Manila Observatory identified other factors behind the disaster aside from the heavy rains. These include illegal logging, deforestation, and geographic conditions. The soil in the Ormoc watershed exceeded its capacity to hold water while the soil in the central part of Leyte is susceptible to erosion, the Manila Observatory said.

In recent history, the most devastating disaster that struck Leyte was Super Typhoon Yolanda (Haiyan). (TIMELINE: Super Typhoon Yolanda)

One of the strongest and most destructive typhoons to hit the country, it claimed at least 6,201 lives as it tore across Eastern Visayas in November 2013. Large parts of Leyte, including Tacloban and Ormoc cities, bore the brunt of Super Typhoon Yolanda, leaving them isolated for weeks in the aftermath. – Rappler.com

 

http://www.rappler.com/newsbreak/iq/174983-fast-facts-leyte-province-natural-disasters

 

http://www.philstar.com/headlines/2013/12/22/1270965/leyte-island-now-phls-disaster-capital-studies

LOS BANOS, Laguna, Philippines – Has the island of Leyte become the disaster capital of the Philippines?

Composed of the provinces of Leyte and Southern Leyte, the island was the most hard-hit when Super Typhoon Yolanda barreled into the Visayas region, killing more than 6,000 people and laying waste to the landscape.

Leyte’s capital Tacloban City absorbed the fury of the storm with more than 90 percent of the once bustling city devastated.

Before Yolanda battered the country on Nov. 8,  a research project of the Baybay City, Leyte-based Visayas State University (VSU) recorded that Leyte island had the “worst landslide history in the Philippines.”

Another study done by the Tacloban-based Eastern Visayas State University (EVSU) showed Tacloban is “disaster prone.”

Over the past two decades, VSU’s principal researcher Beatriz Jadina said more than 6,000 people died in catastrophic calamities that hit Leyte and Southern Leyte.

Headlines ( Article MRec ), pagematch: 1, sectionmatch: 1

Jadina completed the study before the 7.2 magnitude earthquake shook Bohol and neighboring islands last Oct. 15 and before Yolanda cut a wide swath of destruction in many Visayan islands the next month.

Jadina’s study results were published by the Philippine government-hosted Southeast Asian Ministers of Education Organization-Regional Center for Graduate Study and Research in Agriculture (SEAMEO-SEARCA).

SEARCA is one of the 21 regional centers of SEAMEO, an inter-government treaty body that promotes cooperation among Southeast Asian nations in the fields of education, science and culture. The center is based in the University of the Philippines Los Baños (UPLB).

A massive landslide occurred in Ormoc City in November 1991, which killed more than 5,000 people. The heavy rainfall that triggered the landslides in the city was the highest in 100 years, according to the Department of Environment and Natural Resources (DENR).

Another massive landslide took place in Barangay Guinsaugon, St. Bernard, Southern Leyte on Dec. 17, 2006, during which more than 1,000 people perished.

On Dec. 17, 2011, another landslide occurred in St. Bernard, killing five people.

About 200 people died in an earlier landslide on Panaon Island, Southern Leyte on Dec. 19, 2003.

Earthquakes are also common to the island since the Philippine Fault that runs from north to south of the country passes through the center of Leyte and Southern Leyte, Jadina said.

“It is significant to note the occurrence of two earthquakes on the day of the Guinsaugon landslide,” she pointed out.

In the EVSU study, Tacloban has been described as a city ensconced in a “ring of fire,” referring to a region encircling the Pacific where volcanic eruptions, earthquakes and other natural disasters occur with regularity.

From 1901-2000, the Belgium-based Center for Research on the Epidemiology of Disasters said the Philippines suffered the worst combination of earthquakes, volcanic eruptions and floods.

Tacloban City can exemplify the Philippine scenario, the EVSU study said, where its results were highlighted by the Los Baños-based Philippine Council for Agriculture, Aquatic and Natural Resources Research and Development.

The research identified and mapped Tacloban City’s disaster-prone areas, specifically disaster, hazard and vulnerability maps for typhoons, floods and fires.

The flood disaster map showed areas along shores, rivers and swamps where floods regularly happened.

The study also noted that among Tacloban’s 138 barangays, almost half have experienced fire disasters caused by exploding gas tanks, faulty electrical wiring, children playing with matches, unattended lit candles and firewood left burning.

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