Jump to content

Recommended Posts

  • Admin (Retired)
broden

i'm gonna vote no

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
Paul

Don't waste your time or money.

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
Boss Ross
9 minutes ago, Mikala said:

Google is your friend. It's good for your appliances and electronics though! :) Had so many customers in Hawaii ask me about these over the phone and in-person. :(

http://electrical-engineering-portal.com/the-real-truth-behind-household-power-savers

Thanks for posting

Link to post
Share on other sites
Paul

Ross, you want to "save" money on your electric bill? Here's how to do it.

Buy a grid-tied inverter, LIKE THIS. Buy double what you want to inject into your electric mains lines. For example, buy a 600 watts inverter and run it from 300 watts of panels.

NOTE: @Woolf found them even cheaper, by buying them in the Philippines, direct.

Buy the panels, ONLY up to half the rating on your new grid-tied inverter. 

Connect the positive and negative wires from the panels, directly to the positive and negative sides of the inverter. Plug the grid-tied inverter into a power point (receptacle) and away she goes.

The reason I say only power them by half their rated output, is to help them to last longer. You don't want to run any inverter at full rated capacity, day in and day out. It's like flooring your vehicle every time you drive it, all the time you are driving it. It won't last long if you do.

Here are some photos I recently posted in another thread:

Screenshot 2017-06-08 22.25.16.pngScreenshot 2017-06-08 22.25.05.png

During the day, for up to about five to six hours per (sunny) day, this unit will constantly inject 300 watts back into the mains. You will now have 1500 to 1800 watts less, per day, that you no longer have to pay for. This system will pay for itself in under a year. 

Edited by Paul
  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
Enuff
3 minutes ago, Paul said:

Ross, you want to "save" money on your electric bill? Here's how to do it.

Buy a grid-tied inverter, LIKE THIS. Buy double what you want to inject into your electric mains lines. For example, buy a 600 watts inverter and run it from 300 watts of panels.

NOTE: @Woolf found them even cheaper, by buying them in the Philippines, direct.

Buy the panels, ONLY up to half the rating on your new grid-tied inverter. 

Connect the positive and negative wires from the panels, directly to the positive and negative sides of the inverter. Plug the grid-tied inverter into a power point (receptacle) and away she goes.

The reason I say only power them by half their rated output, is to help them to last longer. You don't want to run any inverter at full rated capacity, day in and day out. It's like flooring your vehicle every time you drive it, all the time you are driving it. It won't last long if you do.

Here are some photos I recently posted in another thread:

Screenshot 2017-06-08 22.25.16.pngScreenshot 2017-06-08 22.25.05.png

During the day, for up to about five to six hours per (sunny) day, this unit will constantly inject 300 watts back into the mains. You will now have 1500 to 1800 watts less, per day, that you no longer have to pay for. This system will pay for itself in under a year. 

is there anything to be done with veco or does this just pump in power and reduce your billable usage?

Link to post
Share on other sites
Paul
1 minute ago, Enuff said:

is there anything to be done with veco or does this just pump in power and reduce your billable usage?

Nope. Just plug and play, so to speak. No batteries, no controllers. Just the panels to the grid-tied inverter, to the power point (receptacle), into the grid. 

But, I would err on the side of caution and NOT over drive them, by running them at full rated capacity. 

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
Paul

I figure half their rated output in panels (input), should be fine. 

If you want more savings, duplicate the system with another, say, 300 watts of panels, into another 300 watts grid-tied inverter. You can run more than one, if you wish. 

Keep the inverter outside (in case of fire or other catastrophe), and use screen over all openings to prevent any creatures from entering the unit. Bugs, ants, etc., love electronics, especially if it is easy for them to get to.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
Enuff
1 minute ago, Paul said:

Nope. Just plug and play, so to speak. No batteries, no controllers. Just the panels to the grid-tied inverter, to the power point (receptacle), into the grid. 

But, I would err on the side of caution and NOT over drive them, by running them at full rated capacity. 

ok, thanks 

I'll give it a go. hopefully @Woolf will be able to post the panel information 

Link to post
Share on other sites
Paul

@Boss Ross, below is a link to Woolf's post, regarding purchasing the inverters locally. If you buy panels from a cheap distributor, my advice is to use a ground mount system. Do NOT install them on your roof.

http://www.livingincebuforums.com/topic/103451-experimental-solar-tracking/?do=findComment&comment=1389465

 

@Enuff, this may interest you too, as well, Greg.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Paul
2 minutes ago, Enuff said:

I'll give it a go. hopefully @Woolf will be able to post the panel information 

Just buy your panels anywhere. Local shop, Lazada, wherever. 

His link for the grid-tied inverters is above.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use, Privacy Policy and Guidelines. We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue..