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Battery backup during brownouts


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I just crank up my generator noise please  

I assume you decided against your genset idea, considering the last line of your first paragraph? If that is your only reason for not doing so - they are super quiet already, they sip petrol and have

My battery back up set up has been running since Aug last year. It supply's night lights, security lights, area and 1 street light using 12 volt LED bulbs. A US made battery charger, and a local 200 A

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A_Simple_Man
39 minutes ago, Davaoeno said:

AGM deep cycle 12 volt batteries

The battery in the pic looks just like the one I mentioned that costs 20K pesos in the Hardware Store near where I live and has the same specs.  Seems like a good one but 20K pesos is a hefty price tag.  

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smokey

I just crank up my generator noise please

 

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Davaoeno

In their article they mention providing back up power for a whole house or business using the Aims 6000 and a battery bank of 24 golf cart batteries .   Ive seen houses in the DR with up to 12 batteries, but never 24 .

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AlwaysRt
3 hours ago, RogerDat said:

Seguro Marketing has 200AH golf cart deep cycle batteries for around P10,000 each.

They do not have a charger here that i could find that is automatic in operation. And Seguro  has no idea what charger is needed, nor does the battery company ( Motolite ) that supply them. As I say, unless you want to replace your appliances for anticipated brown out's on occasion, get a generator, diesel preferably.

We have been dealing mostly with 10 minute to an hour brownouts here for the last several months. not really long enough to justify a generator. My APC 650 UPS runs my TV (as a monitor), laptop and router for about 10 minutes of watching a video with normal volume sound. If there was a way to attach a bigger battery to my UPS to allow adding 1 fan and last a couple hours that would be about perfect. Let the UPS still control switching to battery, automatic voltage control, and charging but with a battery that lasts longer.

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Paul
10 hours ago, Kreole said:

I am exploring the option of using batteries for back up during brown outs which are frequent here on Siquijor island.  I have seen them used in the Dominican Republic and they seem to be quite adequate depending on the load and duration of the brownout.  Plus side is that they are easy to charge when there is electricity on, and they are quiet, and take up little space, are easy to install and set up, and batteries can always be added or subtracted depending on need.  Did I mention quiet and non-polluting? 

Down side is that you should only allocate power to the most necessary utilities and appliances, such as lights, refrigerator/freezer, fan, computer/accessories, and others that draw very low amount of current.  Running aircon is an extravagant use and will run the batteries dry in a short time.  You will need extension chords unless you pre-wire your house with the appropriate system to accommodate battery backup.  Any suggestions and experiences will be much appreciated.  Thanks ahead.  

I assume you decided against your genset idea, considering the last line of your first paragraph? If that is your only reason for not doing so - they are super quiet already, they sip petrol and have a very small footprint on the environment. Even batteries cause damage to the environment, if parts of them are thrown away. 

If you are going to do that, I would strongly urge you to go the route @RogerDat did with his system.

You will fare better off, if you go with a quality charger than with some cheaply made unit.

10 hours ago, Kreole said:

Down side is that you should only allocate power to the most necessary utilities and appliances, such as lights, refrigerator/freezer, fan, computer/accessories, and others that draw very low amount of current.

If you want batteries to run an inverter, then power your appliances, you are definitely headed in the wrong direction. You would have to spend CONSIDERABLY more on the batteries and inverter / charger, than you would on a single Honda EU20i inverter generator. Keep in mind, the lower the voltage, the higher the amperage draw. At 12v or 24v, how many amperes would be needed for an inverter just to provide 2 or 3 amperes of output? So, a generator would be a much cheaper, much more economical way to go.

My :twocents:.

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Paul
8 hours ago, Salty Dog said:

Just need to figure out my load for those devices I want to be connected to a UPS.

Your computer (including the monitor) and your modem / router(s). 

I have a 750va for my computer and one monitor. I have a 650va for the sound system and a second monitor. I have another 650va for my modem / router and a second router. 

7 hours ago, Goetz1965 said:

Its not only for brownouts - a backup battery also is good against the all time too much power on the lines - so it secures your equipment everyday.

Agreed. They protect your equipment against spikes / surges and dips in the voltage.

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Woolf
27 minutes ago, Paul said:

Agreed. They protect your equipment against spikes / surges and dips in the voltage.

That depends

Most ups's below 1000 va are backup ups's

the input is connected direct to the output via a relay

at brownout the relay will switch the output to battery and inverter

some of the ups's have avr on the input

description of different kind of ups's here

http://www.apc.com/us/en/faqs/FA157448/

 

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Paul
9 minutes ago, Woolf said:

That depends

Most ups's below 1000 va are backup ups's

the input is connected direct to the output via a relay

at brownout the relay will switch the output to battery and inverter

some of the ups's have avr on the input

description of different kind of ups's here

http://www.apc.com/us/en/faqs/FA157448/

Agreed. But, I was making more of a general statement about them, than a specific one. 

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Humboldt

Goal Zero Yeti 1400 Lithium Lightweight Portable Power System , doesn't get much easier then this , plug in outlet and or solar panel 300 watt panel minimal ,,,,    

 

goal-zero-yeti-1400-lithium-3.png.73e641f5030c43d69dc0add95657fd85.png

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davedude
13 hours ago, Kreole said:

I am exploring the option of using batteries for back up during brown outs which are frequent here on Siquijor island.  I have seen them used in the Dominican Republic and they seem to be quite adequate depending on the load and duration of the brownout.  Plus side is that they are easy to charge when there is electricity on, and they are quiet, and take up little space, are easy to install and set up, and batteries can always be added or subtracted depending on need.  Did I mention quiet and non-polluting? 

Down side is that you should only allocate power to the most necessary utilities and appliances, such as lights, refrigerator/freezer, fan, computer/accessories, and others that draw very low amount of current.  Running aircon is an extravagant use and will run the batteries dry in a short time.  You will need extension chords unless you pre-wire your house with the appropriate system to accommodate battery backup.  Any suggestions and experiences will be much appreciated.  Thanks ahead.  

I spent the money on a battery backed up solar system to power critical functions. Solar panels charge a battery bank and an inverter runs off the battery's. It is sized less than 2K watts and only provides one AC circuit of 115VAC. I use this circuit to power my security system, surveillance system, internet, and phone. It is a separate circuit and not grid connected. Those functions (deemed critical by me) are always powered and never affected by electric utility supply issues. Basically the system provides power and charges the batteries in the daytime and it runs off the batteries at night.

For the refrigerator, lights and fan I run a Honda EU2000 generator if necessary and have 25 gallons of ethanol free gas treated with Stabil locked up in a metal flammables cabinet.

The batteries I got for free, surplus used from work but still with useful life left. They are 105ah AGM batteries especially for backup applications. I have 12 of them in three banks of four. Each bank is fused and switched. All battery wiring is equalized so each battery sees the same length of cable to the distribution bus-bars. This is a 12vdc system so I have some really beefy cabling connecting everything. High current DC wiring stuff is not found at your local Home depot or Lowes! LOL. I made my own battery bank busbars, and the rest of the DC system components is a mix of marine DC stuff and solar system stuff.

On sunny days I get about 33 amps continuous off of my panels. Not enough to charge all the batteries so I have to charge only two banks max at a time. This was supposed to be a small system but kinda grew a little bit. Next time I will do a much higher voltage system.

I am not sure but I had heard the Elon Musk batteries were very expensive and it is still cheaper and better to run old school lead acid. I do not know this for a fact. My employer just installed a new battery UPS system using a butt-ton of gigantic 2 volt DC lead acid batteries. The cases are clear so you can see the guts. Pretty sweet setup.

I guess you could put me in the pro-battery camp..... :-)

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Paul
17 minutes ago, davedude said:

The batteries I got for free, surplus used from work but still with useful life left. They are 105ah AGM batteries especially for backup applications. I have 12 of them in three banks of four. Each bank is fused and switched. All battery wiring is equalized so each battery sees the same length of cable to the distribution bus-bars. This is a 12vdc system so I have some really beefy cabling connecting everything. High current DC wiring stuff is not found at your local Home depot or Lowes! LOL. I made my own battery bank busbars, and the rest of the DC system components is a mix of marine DC stuff and solar system stuff.

Why did you not go with a 24v system, at least?

Also, how many watts of panels are you running?

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davedude
2 minutes ago, Paul said:

Why did you not go with a 24v system, at least?

Also, how many watts of panels are you running?

Wasn't going to be that big to begin with and I was kinda anal about 12vdc for some stupid reason I can't seem to remember now LOL!

Well I have over 800 watts of twelve volt panels. Bought a few at a time as I could afford but made sure they matched electrically. Thing is I do not get that much out of them...claimed wattage is bunk I think, real world wattage nets much lower.

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Paul
2 minutes ago, davedude said:

Thing is I do not get that much out of them...claimed wattage is bunk I think, real world wattage nets much lower.

Check each panel individually. Something is rotten in Denmark.

Or, possibly, shading?

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davedude
2 minutes ago, Paul said:

Check each panel individually. Something is rotten in Denmark.

I need to do that...will have a lookie see.

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