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Kabisay-an gid

Earthquake damage on Buildings

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Lee
38 minutes ago, Kabisay-an gid said:

The high-rise buildings are built to considerably more rigorous standards. You're safer from an earthquake in a modern Philippine high-rise than you are in a low-rise, especially the older low-rises. Modern high-rises are also safer than low-rises from a fire safety standpoint, but I'll save fire safety for another thread.

I agree, there are many reasons why a condo is safer, we live in a condo in both the U.S. and Cebu and I feel pretty darn safe, no bars on my windows, fire hose right across the hallway and fire extinguishers in each unit by the rules, but even if people do not follow the rules, there are fire extinguishers all over the hallways and then there is the fire sprinklers in each unit, how many homes have fire sprinklers, how many have a fire hose even close by or have fire extinguishers, and earthquakes apparently start fires too, if people do not believe me then click the link or search for yourself.  

Quote

 

Earthquakes: collateral effects

Fires

Fires, often associated with broken electrical and gas lines, is one of the common side effects of earthquakes.

 

 

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to_dave007

I was in the ground floor café at the Sarosa hotel in Cebu City the morning of the Bohol quake in 2013.  My main memory at the time was of "Oh SH*T I need to get out from under 10 floors of Philippine concrete."..  Makes you move fast.

Couple hours later I had to go back inside to retrieve my stuff from the room.  The aftershocks made it a nervous time.  Cracks on the walls in the room..  but no other signs of damage.

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Salty Dog
4 minutes ago, to_dave007 said:

...My main memory at the time was of "Oh SH*T..

...Couple hours later I had to go back inside to retrieve my stuff from the room...

And change your pants...:P

Edited by Salty Dog
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Jester
4 hours ago, Salty Dog said:

I was on the 18th floor of a 26 floor building when the last big one hit Cebu City. It was the largest and longest I've ever felt.

I was amazed at how little damage the building sustained. In fact all of it was cosmetic. The building was 2 years old.

Of course going down 18 flights of stairs to exit the building was no fun.

You rich long nose should have something like this. 

aaa.PNG

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A_Simple_Man
On 5/22/2017 at 2:24 PM, Kabisay-an gid said:

Cebu City got rocked by pretty strong earthquakes in February of 2012 and October of 2013. There are dozens of high-rise buildings in Cebu City. None of them collapsed and nobody died in any of them as a result of either earthquake.

I am not sure if you consider the Diplomat Hotel a highrise.  I was staying in it when the Oct 2013 earthquake hit.  I am sure you were not or you would not be making this statement.  It was damn close.  Building was evacuated for a few hours and there was a lot of damage that has since been plastered over.  But you are right, it did not collapse this time and it did not kill anyone this time.  It would not have to have been much stronger to collapse that building, IMHO.  Walking around town after the quake I saw a lot of damage to mid-rise buildings, one bad one was a low cost budget hotel near SM Mall.  But to your point, the real new highrises seemed to do better than the mid rises.  I am staying on the 20th floor of the new Mandarin Hotel as I write this and I would HATE to have an earthquake hit.  I'd probably die of a heart attack after the shaking the Oct 2013 one gave me but you pays your money and you takes your chances and crosses your fingers and make the sign of the cross.

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Aerosick

Practicing our earthquake / fire drills with the wife & nieces. But on the inside of our 22nd Floor condo. Just need to buy 3 more ropes in California and tie them together to reach the 9th Floor pool. Tying knots & loops in the rope to get off on each floor below us that has a balcony to test their doors for being unlocked.

 

DSC02934 (2).JPG

20170523_184008 (2).jpg

Edited by Aerosick
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Davaoeno
14 minutes ago, Aerosick said:

Practicing our earthquake / fire drills with the wife & nieces.

Do you make them climb all the way down the rope or just to the pool ?  [ I assume you dont make them climb back up the rope ? ]

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Aerosick
31 minutes ago, Davaoeno said:

Do you make them climb all the way down the rope or just to the pool ?  [ I assume you dont make them climb back up the rope ? ]

The plan is to go down from our 22nd Floor at least to the 14th Floor that has balconies to try and get back in through a sliding door. Climb down or jump into the pool below us on the 9th Floor is the last option.

No outside trials yet, no volunteers!!!

Edited by Aerosick
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smokey
On ‎5‎/‎22‎/‎2017 at 3:34 PM, Kabisay-an gid said:

A 6.5 ain't no joke, yet still no high-rise collapses or deaths in Cebu City.

Perhaps my eyes are bad, but I wasn't able to find even one earthquake that originated in faults running under Cebu City in the entire 20th and so far in the 21st century.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_earthquakes_in_the_Philippines#Early_20th_century

The Luym building is about 50 years old, but still survived the earthquake without serious damage. The newer high-rises built in the last 25 years will withstand even more.

 

 

I thought I found one but it was baguio and it was 27 years ago ..

th (1).jpg

th.jpg

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Kabisay-an gid
5 hours ago, A_Simple_Man said:

I am not sure if you consider the Diplomat Hotel a highrise.  I was staying in it when the Oct 2013 earthquake hit.  I am sure you were not or you would not be making this statement.  It was damn close.  Building was evacuated for a few hours and there was a lot of damage that has since been plastered over.  But you are right, it did not collapse this time and it did not kill anyone this time.  It would not have to have been much stronger to collapse that building, IMHO.  Walking around town after the quake I saw a lot of damage to mid-rise buildings, one bad one was a low cost budget hotel near SM Mall.  But to your point, the real new highrises seemed to do better than the mid rises.  I am staying on the 20th floor of the new Mandarin Hotel as I write this and I would HATE to have an earthquake hit.  I'd probably die of a heart attack after the shaking the Oct 2013 one gave me but you pays your money and you takes your chances and crosses your fingers and make the sign of the cross.

Thanks for proving my point.

The Diplomat Hotel is 8 stories, which classifies it as a MID-RISE. A high-rise is 12 stories or greater.

I repeat - not one high-rise in Cebu City collapsed and nobody died in a high-rise in the 2012 and 2013 earthquakes. An impressive record that mid-rises and low-rises can't match.

It's considerably safer to be on the 20th floor of a modern high-rise building than in a mid-rise or low-rise, especially the older ones.

Also, you're obviously confusing cosmetic/superficial damage and structural damage - two different things. Any damage that can be "plastered over" is cosmetic or superficial, such as cracks in interior room walls. Collapsed false ceilings and fallen light fixtures are other examples of cosmetic/superficial damage that might look nasty, but doesn't adversely affect the structural integrity of the main frame of the building.

Replace fear with knowledge, and you won't die of a heart attack if you're in a modern high-rise building when the next earthquake hits. :)

 

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Headshot
15 minutes ago, Kabisay-an gid said:

Also, you're obviously confusing cosmetic/superficial damage and structural damage - two different things. Any damage that can be "plastered over" is cosmetic or superficial

Seriously? I know for a fact that cracks to major structural elements (columns and beams) in buildings here (that I have personal knowledge of) were simply plastered over. You are thinking that the rules they go by in the US are also the rules they go by in the Philippines. It isn't the case. If damage can be covered up here (so the public feels good about it again), it will be. Out of sight, out of mind. It is cheaper to patch than it is to tear down and rebuild.

Edited by Headshot
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hyaku
7 hours ago, A_Simple_Man said:

I am not sure if you consider the Diplomat Hotel a highrise.  I was staying in it when the Oct 2013 earthquake hit.  I am sure you were not or you would not be making this statement.  It was damn close.  Building was evacuated for a few hours and there was a lot of damage that has since been plastered over.  But you are right, it did not collapse this time and it did not kill anyone this time.  It would not have to have been much stronger to collapse that building, IMHO.  Walking around town after the quake I saw a lot of damage to mid-rise buildings, one bad one was a low cost budget hotel near SM Mall.  But to your point, the real new highrises seemed to do better than the mid rises.  I am staying on the 20th floor of the new Mandarin Hotel as I write this and I would HATE to have an earthquake hit.  I'd probably die of a heart attack after the shaking the Oct 2013 one gave me but you pays your money and you takes your chances and crosses your fingers and make the sign of the cross.

Those cracks in the elevator shaft looked deep to me. I just started to stay there again now it's renovated.

We are on the edge of the Philippine Trench and on the Ring of Fire There have been 10 quakes in the past 17 days. If anyone feels uneasy about quakes they really should not live here. Worst one I have been in close proximity of was a 7.0. I was in a 100 year old house with 12" wooden cross beams. It felt like the hand of God had hit the side of the house as it rocked. But no damage.

Watching a guy take a week hitting my concrete water tank to demolish it I feel quite confident in where I live. It was built twenty years ago with not so much as a crack and we get tremors all the time.

Edited by hyaku
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Kabisay-an gid
1 hour ago, Headshot said:

Seriously? I know for a fact that cracks to major structural elements (columns and beams) in buildings here (that I have personal knowledge of) were simply plastered over. You are thinking that the rules they go by in the US are also the rules they go by in the Philippines. It isn't the case. If damage can be covered up here (so the public feels good about it again), it will be. Out of sight, out of mind. It is cheaper to patch than it is to tear down and rebuild.

Name the specific high-rise buildings and describe specific structural damage. 

You claim to be aware of serious structural damage to high-rise buildings, yet you haven't reported it to the authorities? What if one of them collapses and people die? Shameful!

You think all buildings in the USA are safe? Google the McGuire building, Belltown, Seattle, Washington. Modern 25-story high-rise apartment building that opened in 2001 - condemned and vacated in 2010 due to serious construction defects - demolished in 2011-12. No damage from earthquakes or other natural calamaties - just sorry a$$ flawed construction.

 

.

 

Edited by Kabisay-an gid

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Kabisay-an gid
5 hours ago, smokey said:

I thought I found one but it was baguio and it was 27 years ago ..

th (1).jpg

th.jpg

Thanks for the photos. That was the Hyatt Terraces Hotel in Baguio - an older building built to 1950's standards.

However, if you dig a little deeper into the story - what actually collapsed was just the terraces at the front of the hotel, over the lobby/restaurant area. The separate building that housed the guest rooms didn't collapse, you can see it still standing on the left side of your photos. Nobody died in any of the guest rooms - all the deaths were people in the lobby/restaurant area crushed by the collapsed terraces.

 

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Kabisay-an gid
7 hours ago, Aerosick said:

Practicing our earthquake / fire drills with the wife & nieces. But on the inside of our 22nd Floor condo. Just need to buy 3 more ropes in California and tie them together to reach the 9th Floor pool. Tying knots & loops in the rope to get off on each floor below us that has a balcony to test their doors for being unlocked.

 I would much prefer one of these:

 

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