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Local wall , and other construction failures


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fred42
3 hours ago, oztony said:

All external walls are meant to be minimum 6" block to even meet the Philippine building code , but 99% are still done with 4".

 

The building code says that? Really? Can  you please post a link to that info as I had no idea..

Clearly none of the engineers that have signed off on our building  plans had any idea of that either..

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@A_Simple_Man @Kabisay-an gid @shadow  I thought this worthy of it's own thread , and will save the back and forths about fence construction in "the bad guy's" thread. I have borrowed Dave's

Here is another example of clueless activity , all they had to do was use a chicken mesh or similar to help keep this together , but on goes the concrete without anything to keep it binded together ..

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oztony
Just now, fred42 said:

 

The building code says that? Really? Can  you please post a link to that info as I had no idea..

Clearly none of the engineers that have signed off on our building  plans had any idea of that either..

Fred I will try and dig it out , I read it quite some time ago while researching on the internet...

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oztony

file:///F:/New%20folder%20(18)/New%20folder%20(17)/Building%20Code%20of%20the%20Philippines.pdf

Capturefred.PNG

My interpretation of this would be , if the lateral beams were sized correctly and poured independently that it would not apply , but if the beams were formed ontop of the wall and integrated as such , that the wall also becomes load bearing , along with the beam....(which is how I build)

 

Regardless of all of this , IMO 4" is ok for internal walls , you have 2 inches left to fill after you take the wall thickness of the block into account , and how do you successfully tie the wall to the beam with any reasonable integrity and successfully core fill the whole wall including the last course ?

Every one has their own methods... some are far superior to others. 

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oztony

Here is a Phil build that looks ok to me , you can clearly see that the beams have been formed and poured on top of 6" blockwork

114+home+designs+in+philippines+iloilo+2

133++two+story+house+designs+iloilo+hous

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fred42
3 hours ago, oztony said:

 

file:///F:/New%20folder%20(18)/New%20folder%20(17)/Building%20Code%20of%20the%20Philippines.pdf

Capturefred.PNG

My interpretation of this would be , if the lateral beams were sized correctly and poured independently that it would not apply

 

OK,Thanks..

That must be why the engineers that signed our drawings Ok`d 4" CHB`s for our exterior walls.. 

All our Posts and beams and floors are poured long before we even order CHB`s!

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USMC-Retired

Lets keep this topic on target with construction failures.  I have split all posts dealing with natural disasters to their own topic.

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SkyMan
On 5/21/2017 at 10:05 AM, oztony said:

It JUST MAKES IT SO EASY to see what went wrong.

Looks to me like the column footings weren't deep enough, or big enough.

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SkyMan
11 hours ago, oztony said:

They try to explain away the 6" thing as an inch of cement render on either side of the 4" block wall equaling 6 inches , but no cigar on that one,

Sounds like that qualifies to me based on the code you posted.  The code states wall thickness of 6", not necessarily block thickness.  TriD panels are just foam insulation with a lot of render on both sides.

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oztony
8 minutes ago, SkyMan said:

Looks to me like the column footings weren't deep enough, or big enough.

For sure ...they skimped on that big time.

3 minutes ago, SkyMan said:

Sounds like that qualifies to me based on the code you posted.  The code states wall thickness of 6", not necessarily block thickness.  TriD panels are just foam insulation with a lot of render on both sides.

But I would reckon those panels would be used in conjunction with a separately poured beam , the beam is independant to begin with..

as opposed to a beam formed and poured ontop of an exterior wall ....if you get my drift...

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SkyMan
10 minutes ago, oztony said:

But I would reckon those panels would be used in conjunction with a separately poured beam , the beam is independant to begin with..

 

You can build with those panels with no columns or beams.  I think there is supposed to be 2 inches of render on each side.  But it's not the typical render you see here and definitely not beach sand.

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oztony
5 minutes ago, SkyMan said:

You can build with those panels with no columns or beams.  I think there is supposed to be 2 inches of render on each side.  But it's not the typical render you see here and definitely not beach sand.

What supports the roof load ? @Headshot Didn't Bill use that system upstairs on his house , but with a steel portal frame type structure...?

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SkyMan
4 minutes ago, oztony said:

What supports the roof load ? @Headshot Didn't Bill use that system upstairs on his house , but with a steel portal frame type structure...?

Yes, and with columns.  But they aren't required.

 

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RogerDat

The rock they use here from local hardware is coated with mud / dust, so cement cannot bond with it in columns, and the washed sand is a joke, and fine sand is fine AFTER U sieve it for the render.

I love my roll formed steel frame house. NO cement block smell! NO mold cause vapor barrier under slab.

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Headshot
32 minutes ago, SkyMan said:

Yes, and with columns.  But they aren't required.

Maybe not, but the system I used felt safer to me. The steel columns and beams not only gave me firm anchors for the wall panels, but they gave me a firm anchor for the roof structure. It is just as likely to have a roof failure as a wall failure here.

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Woolf

My house is build with welded steel columns an steel beams and 4"  blocks

rebar welded to columns and beams, second floor welded bottom and top

no damage during the quake

Edited by Woolf
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