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United Airlines "we will drag your a$$ off"


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smokey
1 hour ago, guardsman said:

I don't know how to start a poll nor would I want to.  Whatever the legality of dragging a bloke off a plane it was a terrible decision and morally corrupt.

Bumping someone at check in?  Part of the game for regular travellers.  Dragging a checked, paid-for and ensconced passenger out of his seat?  This has never happened before in a 1st world country.

problem I see if I am on plane sitting and they ask the guy (this guy ) to get off and he says no and they then say ok and look at me and say you get off now I am mad... once they decided and let everyone know they had to go forward

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New United Airlines Motto’s: “Drag and Drop” “We put the hospital in hospitality” “Board as a doctor, leave as a patient” “Our prices can’t be beaten, but our passen

facts 1. he had purchased a seat, boarded the fcuking plane and was sitting in his seat. 2. the airline oversold the flight? correction, they had four employees flying that were added which

United Airlines CEO Oscar Munoz has defiantly stated he will not quit. "You'd have to drag me out."

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Mikala
21 minutes ago, Enuff said:

if you or anyone else was foolish enough to have UA stock, I suggest selling it now as this will end up putting them out of business.

I really doubt this is more than a minor speed bump in United's stock. The media will lose interest and the public has the attention span of a rock. :)

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guardsman
7 minutes ago, smokey said:

problem I see if I am on plane sitting and they ask the guy (this guy ) to get off and he says no and they then say ok and look at me and say you get off now I am mad... once they decided and let everyone know they had to go forward

That's a fair point but they shouldn't have allowed themselves to get to that stage.  United had several checkpoints at which they could have handled this better. 

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USMC-Retired

4 people are chosen and three exit the plane without issue.  One feels entitled and refuses to get up.  Was it handled poorly yes.  The police should issue him a trespass warning, refuse to leave now your arrested.  That is the simple easy way, you agree to the overbooked policy when you purchase a ticket, want to avoid it buy non-refundable,  non-transferable tickets.  Either that or buy a first class ticket.  I do not feel for the guy at all he was subject to the same rules as all other passengers.  Was it handled poorly yes and United should be held accountable for that.  The same token he was treated the way he was because he was an entitled feeling asshole.  

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guardsman
1 minute ago, USMC-Retired said:

4 people are chosen and three exit the plane without issue.  One feels entitled   

God preserve us from ever buying  ticket and feeling that we're entitled to get conveyed from Point A to Point B.

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Enuff
11 minutes ago, USMC-Retired said:

4 people are chosen and three exit the plane without issue.  One feels entitled and refuses to get up.  Was it handled poorly yes.  The police should issue him a trespass warning, refuse to leave now your arrested.  That is the simple easy way, you agree to the overbooked policy when you purchase a ticket, want to avoid it buy non-refundable,  non-transferable tickets.  Either that or buy a first class ticket.  I do not feel for the guy at all he was subject to the same rules as all other passengers.  Was it handled poorly yes and United should be held accountable for that.  The same token he was treated the way he was because he was an entitled feeling asshole.  

He didn't feel entitled, he was entitled!

His "contract of carriage" was fulfilled on his end and UA didn't fulfill their end, instead they chose to involve the authorities.

I hope you are pulled off a plane as your family watches and then you can ponder the statements you have made.

He bought a seat, checked in, boarded the plane and was seated........ end of story.

UA will fry for this and I hope EVERY UA employee is bumped to immediate unemployment and EVERY company official is so broke the have to turn tricks in a truck stop!

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Mandingo

 

https://www.transportation.gov/airconsumer/fly-rights

 

Involuntary Bumping

DOT requires each airline to give all passengers who are bumped involuntarily a written statement describing their rights and explaining how the carrier decides who gets on an oversold flight and who doesn't. Those travelers who don't get to fly are frequently entitled to denied boarding compensation in the form of a check or cash. The amount depends on the price of their ticket and the length of the delay:

  • If you are bumped involuntarily and the airline arranges substitute transportation that is scheduled to get you to your final destination (including later connections) within one hour of your original scheduled arrival time, there is no compensation.
  • If the airline arranges substitute transportation that is scheduled to arrive at your destination between one and two hours after your original arrival time (between one and four hours on international flights), the airline must pay you an amount equal to 200% of your one-way fare to your final destination that day, with a $675 maximum.
  • If the substitute transportation is scheduled to get you to your destination more than two hours later (four hours internationally), or if the airline does not make any substitute travel arrangements for you, the compensation doubles (400% of your one-way fare, $1350 maximum).
  • If your ticket does not show a fare (for example, a frequent-flyer award ticket or a ticket issued by a consolidator), your denied boarding compensation is based on the lowest cash, check or credit card payment charged for a ticket in the same class of service (e.g., coach, first class) on that flight.
  • You always get to keep your original ticket and use it on another flight. If you choose to make your own arrangements, you can request an "involuntary refund" for the ticket for the flight you were bumped from. The denied boarding compensation is essentially a payment for your inconvenience.
  • If you paid for optional services on your original flight (e.g., seat selection, checked baggage) and you did not receive those services on your substitute flight or were required to pay a second time, the airline that bumped you must refund those payments to you.

Like all rules, however, there are a few conditions and exceptions:

  • To be eligible for compensation, you must have a confirmed reservation. A written confirmation issued by the airline or an authorized agent or reservation service qualifies you in this regard even if the airline can't find your reservation in the computer, as long as you didn't cancel your reservation or miss a reconfirmation deadline.
  • Each airline has a check-in deadline, which is the amount of time before scheduled departure that you must present yourself to the airline at the airport. For domestic flights most carriers require you to be at the departure gate between 10 minutes and 30 minutes before scheduled departure, but some deadlines can be an hour or longer. Check-in deadlines on international flights can be as much as three hours before scheduled departure time. Some airlines may simply require you to be at the ticket/baggage counter by this time; most, however, require that you get all the way to the boarding area. Some may have deadlines at both locations. If you miss the check-in deadline, you may have lost your reservation and your right to compensation if the flight is oversold.

As noted above, no compensation is due if the airline arranges substitute transportation which is scheduled to arrive at your destination within one hour of your originally scheduled arrival time.

If the airline must substitute a smaller plane for the one it originally planned to use, the carrier isn't required to pay people who are bumped as a result. In addition, on flights using aircraft with 30 through 60 passenger seats, compensation is not required if you were bumped due to safety-related aircraft weight or balance constraints.

The rules do not apply to charter flights, or to scheduled flights operated with planes that hold fewer than 30 passengers. They don't apply to international flights inbound to the United States, although some airlines on these routes may follow them voluntarily. Also, if you are flying between two foreign cities -- from Paris to Rome, for example -- these rules will not apply. The European Commission has a rule on bumpings that occur in an EC country; ask the airline for details, or go to http://ec.europa.eu/transport/passengers/air/air_en.htm[external link].

Airlines set their own "boarding priorities" -- the order in which they will bump different categories of passengers in an oversale situation. When a flight is oversold and there are not enough volunteers, some airlines bump passengers with the lowest fares first. Others bump the last passengers to check in. Once you have purchased your ticket, the most effective way to reduce the risk of being bumped is to get to the airport early. For passengers in the same fare class the last passengers to check in are usually the first to be bumped, even if they have met the check-in deadline. Allow extra time; assume that the roads are backed up, the parking lot is full, and there is a long line at the check-in counter.

Airlines may offer free tickets or dollar-amount vouchers for future flights in place of a check for denied boarding compensation. However, if you are bumped involuntarily you have the right to insist on a check if that is your preference. Once you cash the check (or accept the free flight), you will probably lose the ability to pursue more money from the airline later on. However, if being bumped costs you more money than the airline will pay you at the airport, you can try to negotiate a higher settlement with their complaint department. If this doesn't work, you usually have 30 days from the date on the check to decide if you want to accept the amount of the check. You are always free to decline the check (e.g., not cash it) and take the airline to court to try to obtain more compensation. DOT's denied boarding regulation spells out the airlines' minimum obligation to people they bump involuntarily. Finally, don't be a "no-show." If you are holding confirmed reservations you don't plan to use, notify the airline. If you don't, they will cancel all onward or return reservations on your trip.

 

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Mikala
5 minutes ago, Enuff said:

He bought a seat, checked in, boarded the plane and was seated........ end of story.

Yet, even the fake news media admits that it was United's right (and in accordance with FAA rules) to bump him off the flight to meet their business needs.

I'd be upset as heck if I had my flight delayed due to a snowflake passenger that refused to deplane when informed his seat had been reassigned to someone else. I prefer folks to act mature!

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USMC-Retired
9 minutes ago, Enuff said:

He didn't feel entitled, he was entitled!

His "contract of carriage" was fulfilled on his end and UA didn't fulfill their end, instead they chose to involve the authorities.

I hope you are pulled off a plane as your family watches and then you can ponder the statements you have made.

He bought a seat, checked in, boarded the plane and was seated........ end of story.

UA will fry for this and I hope EVERY UA employee is bumped to immediate unemployment and EVERY company official is so broke the have to turn tricks in a truck stop!

I have been bumped off a plane and it suxs.  However it is allowed and part of his contract.  The seat is not his till the doors close and you pull away from the gate.  

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Did anyone else notice the Asian woman following them off the plane ? His wife ? flight attendant ?

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guardsman
8 minutes ago, USMC-Retired said:

I have been bumped off a plane and it suxs.  However it is allowed and part of his contract.  The seat is not his till the doors close and you pull away from the gate.  

I think we've all been buddy and of course it sucks.  I've never seen such a situation before and the fault is very much with the carrier.

Hiring a private plane for the trolley dollies now looks like the cheap option.

Edited by guardsman
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Jester
15 minutes ago, Mikala said:

Yet, even the fake news media admits that it was United's right (and in accordance with FAA rules) to bump him off the flight to meet their business needs.

I'd be upset as heck if I had my flight delayed due to a snowflake passenger that refused to deplane when informed his seat had been reassigned to someone else. I prefer folks to act mature!

Looks like you and I are on the wrong planet, along with a couple others! 

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USMC-Retired

People like the fact they miss a flight the ticket is still good or want to stay on vacation another several days.  They buy a ticket that will allow it and because of that there is a 10% overbooking rule.  Yes United handled it incorrectly but the guy also was equally an ass. 

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Jester

Someone start a poll,  I say some lawyer will get ahold of him and bilk him for some money, but he will not get a cent in lawsuit even if it gets to court,  what say ya all? 

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Enuff
1 minute ago, Jester said:

Someone start a poll,  I say some lawyer will get ahold of him and bilk him for some money, but he will not get a cent in lawsuit even if it gets to court,  what say ya all? 

It will never get to court. UA will settle a quietly as possible in hopes that all is forgotten.

I would venture to say that this has already cost the airline plenty with the stock crash and will likely end up costing them well over $1 million to get a hush hush settlement.

If it went to an actual jury of 12 piers, UA would pay out the ass! 

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