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Question About Circumcision for Kids in the Philippines

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Salty Dog

I think the only men who feel it is abusive and barbaric are the ones who haven't been circumcised.

Considering 7 out of 10 men aren't circumcised, that would mean most men. Most of those who are circumcised are Muslims....

 

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AB2000

They are too young to make a decision like that. Especially with all the peer pressure they will have received.

 

It is unnecessary mutilation. The people who performed it should be charged with child abuse.

I was just giving the OP some data, not suggesting he does or does not.

 

Since I was circumcised as an infant, maybe I don't know what I'm missing.

 

But my boys haven't complained since their mutilation .

 

And we have at least one post here giving a positive review having experienced both.

 

So with all of that, I'd say wait and let the boy decide if he wants part of his weewee cut off when he is old enough to understand what getting cut means.

 

 

 

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quit_yume

 

 

for the Poster, Tell your wife, NO WAY!, in this case YOU should show who's boss!!

 

It's not about 'who's boss'.   We are adults and we talk these things through. ;)

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HeyMike

I see nothing wrong with male circumcision in general, but especially if it is part of your religious understanding that males should be circumcised on the 8th day of birth.

 

I would not want to wait until my son was 6 to 12 years old before he is circumcised.  

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HTM

Does being born a healthy male require surgical correction?

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HeyMike

Does being born a healthy male require surgical correction?

 

No, I don't think so.

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mahogany

This is such a typical culturally-laden issue, isn't it? For a Muslim or Jew it is unthinkable to not be circumcised; the Filipino believes that an uncircumcised "pisot" is not a man, someone still dirty and unclean and still a child http://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=Pisot; the 'enlightened' Westerner believes that all of this amounts to child abuse. Interesting.

 

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Headshot

If for no other reason, the reduction of STD transmission should be considered when deciding what is best for your children. I believe that it is a parent's responsibility to do whatever they think is in the child's best interests long-term. Circumcision is very common in the US, regardless of religion, so while it may be based on religious beliefs in other parts of the world, that is not the case in the US.

 

 

http://healthland.time.com/2013/04/17/why-circumcision-lowers-risk-of-hiv/

 

Why Circumcision Lowers Risk of HIV

 

Promising trials hinted that circumcision could lower rates of HIV infection, but until now, researchers didn’t fully understand why

By Alice Park

 

Promising trials hinted that circumcision could lower rates of HIV infection, but until now, researchers didn’t fully understand why.

 

Now, in a study published in the journal mBio, scientists say that changes in the population of bacteria living on and around the penis may be partly responsible.

 

Relying on the latest technology that make sequencing the genes of organisms faster and more accessible, Lance Price of the Translational Genomics Research institute (TGen) and his colleagues conducted a detailed genetic analysis of the microbial inhabitants of the penis among a group of Ugandan men who provided samples before circumcision and again a year later.

 

While the men showed similar communities of microbes before the operation, 12 months later, the circumcised men harbored dramatically fewer bacteria that survive in low oxygen conditions. They also had 81% less bacteria overall compared to the uncircumcised men, and that could have a dramatic effect on the men’s ability to fight off infections like HIV, says Price. Previous studies showed that circumcised men lowered their risk of transmitting HIV by as much as 50%, making the operation an important tool in preventing infection with the virus. Why? A high burden of bacteria could disrupt the ability of specialized immune cells known as Langerhans cells to activate immune defenses. Normally, Langerhans are responsible for grabbing invading microbes like bacteria or viruses and presenting them to immune cells for training, to prime the body to recognize and react against the pathogens. But when the bacterial load increases, as it does in the uncircumcised penile environment, inflammatory reactions increase and these cells actually start to infect healthy cells with the offending microbe rather than merely present them.

 

That may be why uncircumcised men are more likely to transmit HIV than men without the foreskin, says Price, since the Langerhans cells could be feeding HIV directly to healthy cells. His group is also investigating how changes in the levels of cytokines, which are the signaling molecules that immune cells use to communicate with each other, might be influenced by bacterial populations.

 

“There is a real revolution going on in our understanding of the microbiome,” says Price, who is also professor of occupational and environmental health at George Washington University. “The microbiome is almost like another organ system, and we are just scratching the surface of understanding the interplay between the microbiome and the immune system.”

 

Previous work suggested that changes in the bacterial populations in the gut, for example, could affect obesity, and other studies found potential connections between microbial communities and the risk for cancer, asthma and other chronic conditions.

 

 

http://www.webmd.com/men/news/20090325/circumcision-cuts-stds#1

 

Circumcision May Reduce Risk of STDs

 

Study Shows Circumcised Men Have Less Risk of Herpes, Genital Wart/Cancer Virus

By Daniel J. DeNoon

 

Circumcised men have a 25% lower risk of genital herpes and a 35% lower risk of HPV, the virus that causes genital warts and cancers.

 

The data come from a study in Uganda that already has shown circumcision effective in reducing a man's risk of HIV infection from heterosexual sex. The two-year study by Johns Hopkins researcher Aaron A.R. Tobian, MD, PhD, and colleagues enrolled nearly 3,400 men negative for HSV-2, the genital herpes virus.

 

"These findings ... indicate that circumcision should now be accepted as an efficacious intervention for reducing heterosexually acquired infections with HSV-2, HPV, and HIV in adolescent boys and men," the researchers conclude. "However, it must be emphasized that protection was only partial, and it is critical to promote the practice of safe sex."

 

The study did not show whether circumcision has any effect on homosexual transmission of HIV or other sexually transmitted diseases (STDs).

 

Some studies have suggested that circumcised men may be at lower risk of syphilis, but the Tobian study found no evidence to support this. Syphilis rates in the study were similar in both circumcised and uncircumcised men.

 

Nevertheless, circumcised men in the study had fewer genital ulcers.

 

How can circumcision prevent STDs? In at least three ways:

 

When the foreskin is removed, the skin covering the head of the penis becomes tougher. That may protect against "microtears" during sex that can provide a point of entry for germs.

The mucosal lining of the foreskin may allow germs to penetrate to underlying skin cells.

After sex, the foreskin may prolong the time that tender skin is exposed to germs.

Circumcised men may be protecting their sex partners as well as themselves, suggest University of Washington researchers Matthew R. Golden, MD, MPH, and Judith N. Wasserheit, MD, MPH, in an editorial accompanying the Tobian study.

 

Data from earlier studies indicate that monogamous women with circumcised sex partners are only half as likely to get cervical cancer as are women with uncircumcised sex partners. And the Tobian study shows that circumcision cuts the risk of HPV, the virus that can cause cervical cancer.

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SkyMan

Does being born a healthy male require surgical correction?

So then you'd leave the umbilical cord and placenta attached?

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Monsoon

Personally I would pass on it. I wouldn't let myself get sucked into making poor decisions for my child 'just because its the way they do it here.'

 

They also tend to pierce female baby's ears very early (Not my daughter!)

 

They also give the baby the mother's maiden name as a middle name.. (Not my daughter!) 

 

Do what you feel is right for your child, not what some 'tradition' says.

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richard_ost

They also give the baby the mother's maiden name as a middle name.. (Not my daughter!) 

 

 

Sorry for getting a little offtopic but how did you pull this off? I tried it but they refused it because it's the law to name a child with the middle name if married. I heard of an American being able to do this 30 years ago for her daughter as well, I think they were scared to piss off a Vietnam vet...

 

Circumcision without a proper medical reason doesn't make any sense, cultural or not. Specially in a country when it's not uncommon to have complications after a medical procedure...

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SkyMan

 

 

Considering 7 out of 10 men aren't circumcised, that would mean most men.
70% is a good choice.  In fact, studies have shown that 70% of people will believe a statistic based on 70%, 70% of the time.  :)  

 

They also tend to pierce female baby's ears very early (Not my daughter!)
I've seen a lot more of that in the US than here.

 

it's the law to name a child with the middle name if married.
I'd like to see that law.
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Monsoon

Sorry for getting a little offtopic but how did you pull this off? I tried it but they refused it because it's the law to name a child with the middle name if married. I heard of an American being able to do this 30 years ago for her daughter as well, I think they were scared to piss off a Vietnam vet...

..

I quite simply filled out the application for birth certificate at the hospital and signed it. They did ask me a few times "you don't want to use the mothers name?"

 

It is indeed something in the law but there must be exceptions, for I did it without pulling any strings. in fact there was an expat couple having a baby on the same day as my daughter was born- certainly the Philippines wouldn't expect a British couple to adopt a foreign naming convention due to a temporary work assignment in the Philippines.

 

I should also add that my wife agreed with all of these departures from the cultural norm. We discussed it and I explained my thoughts behind it and she agreed. We chose something meaningful to us that will hopefully be meaningful to our daughter.

 

The name thing I felt was unnecessary and could have a negative impact on her down the road as who knows which country she might live in. One of my colleagues has like 6 names and it is a royal pain for him whenever dealing with something in the western world.

 

The way they do circumcision here is barbaric! Do it at birth or don't do it at all!

 

I know some children of expats who have asked to have it done out of peer pressure or whatever.

 

 

 

 

 

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Edited by Monsoon

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Skywalker
I think the only men who feel it is abusive and barbaric are the ones who haven't been circumcised.

 

Well, there's a closely observed, and convincing argument.  I must remember that for my next debate.

 

"The Earth was flat in the Middle Ages, because the vast majority of people believed that to be the case."

 

:paul:

 

And you are quite wrong.  I've met many guys who were cut as babies, and they consider it abusive.

Edited by Skywalker

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Skywalker
So then you'd leave the umbilical cord and placenta attached?

 

Yes........obviously.

 

And I'd go out and sacrifice a goat, to the moon.

 

Probably useful if you actually construct a plausible argument, than make a remark like that.  Just a thought.

Edited by Skywalker
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