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going to cebu living on the edge


seattle2cebu

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overthere-really
QUOTE (overthere-really @ Feb 18 2009, 09:51 AM)

I know of 3 schools in Cebu that give a one month certification course. One is owned by the guy who runs eslcafe.com.

 

 

Dave doesn't own any TEFL course company. You are thinking about TEFL International, they are the biggest advertiser on ESLCafe. They have a course here in Cebu City run through one of their franchises. You can find their office in next to BTC.

 

I have very strong opinions about TEFL International and other TEFL courses. If it's not a CELTA course then it's a waste of your money. Anyways, TEFL International has quite a history of playing dirty pool and it's owner, Brucey Veldhuisen, reeks of the same smell that emanates from a used car salesman.

 

 

QUOTE

They're kind of pricy but if you take the course with 4 weeks of instruction and experience teaching real students(part of the curriculum), you'll get the job before someone who did a short course or got their Cert. online.

 

 

They are kind of pricey because of their marketing budget and the bounty they pay for each student recruited.

 

QUOTE

I have a friend who taught ESL teachers in many countries and she said eslcafe.com was the best resource out there. I know 2 of those schools give courses in a dozen or so countries and offer placement assistance. Some people go to the ones in Bankok because it's cheaper to stay there while attending.

 

 

There are better sites out there but when you are just getting started, eslcafe.com is a good first stop. Other sites I would recommend are:

 

teflwatch.com

teflschoolreviews.com

greattefljobs.com

eltworld.net

eltworld.net/forums

 

QUOTE

It may be different now but when I was in the Phils 8 months ago I was offered a job teaching ESL in Manila on my second day there just because I spoke American english, no certificate, no experience.

 

 

Big clue: In many countries of the world, you don't need a certificate or experience to get a job teaching English. All you need to be is a native English speaker. If you are with it enough, you can learn everything you need to know from books and a little practice.

 

If you really want a certificate, then you need to get a truly internationally recognized certificate and that means getting CELTA or Trinity Certificate.

 

Thanks for the education Penguin. I've found it impossible to find objective information on any of the schools. I'll look into those sites you listed.

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retireyoung
I have been playing online poker for three years. Ive gotten to a place in my game that

 

I can actually make money believe it or not.

 

I read a blog on a guy who lives in Argentina making a living playing poker online. It seems like there are a few people doing it. So, it is definitely possible.

 

He has since also set up some websites which make money telling people how to do it all. I can see a future ebook title "Live in the the Philippines making money from online poker". B)

 

Like a few people have mentioned, your best way to make money is from the US/Europe where currencies and economy is strong (well most of the time) and live in a country where living costs are much lower. The internet makes this all possible. And there are 1000s of ways to make money online depending on your skills/interest. You can also run your business from anywhere and you won't be competing with the locals.

 

Problem for most people is that it takes time to develop and most people give up pretty quickly. You just need to be patient and persistent.

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USMC-Retired

This is just what I would do in your situation. I would look at business that you think will generate money for you. I would then toss the ideas around and look at what is the cost risk and spread sheet all the numbers to see what is the min to just break even. Once you have done that look at the competition in the area and see how you can take away from those. Then I would look at get the expenses taken care of before you move here. Get the place running and have a 3 month nest egg just for the business. My internet cafe in Talisay started off making 400-500 a day the first 2 months it was open. Now it generates just under 2000 a day. Those are net figures.

 

Food I just do not think is the way to go. Messy and lots of work in my opinion.

 

 

Khris and I started a Laundry business in Cordova. Very successful then we sold off the assets and moved. However what we did was look at the avenues to get more and more customers. Khris then went to all the Korean schools and offered door to door service. We also had sheets and you name it. However at the time it was not being done and I had an in with the schools. The outlay for this business was 7000 dollars. We made about 45 thousand pesos a month after expenses. Just was alot of work. I guess I am lazy.

 

Then we started internet cafes. We had two and are now down to one. However we started small 10 computers running a 999 peso a month connection. We calculated with all expenses we had to run the computers 600 hours a month to reach a break even after electric rent and other misc items. So then to break it down further we need to have the 10 computers running 20 hours a day. With 10 computers that is each computer doing about 2 hours a day. Easy right. However we have niched the market for chatters and think I have one of the nicest Cafe's in the Talisay area. Currently each computer is averaging 7.23 hours per day of usage on 20 machines. We compete very well with the local market. There were 4 cafes in the area we opened now there is one. So we are doing something right. The outlay for such a business is about 3500 dollars.

 

If you need help with either of these two types PM I will try and help you. I have some very valuable lessons that were painful that I can prevent.

 

 

These are two ideas that I know generate enough money to sustain you. However you need to be prepared that the first 2 months will be horrid. Barley breaking even. So a nest egg it. Just get them started prior to coming and that way you can funnel the money in.

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seattle2cebu

Would you consider this an online diploma mill ? This school also offers the course at the school in Cebu.

 

http://www.hcsinternational.org/link/tesol.html

 

I have an AA degree. Im working on a BA online at present. The BA requirement can be waived at a reputable school. Seattle Pacific University here in seattle has a course like you describe, and they can waive the BA requirement.

 

I have worked in call centers primarily the last 15 years. I have worked as a trainer, content developer, and etc. My english skills are good. I have been collecting some english school materials.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

When I first came here I thought I would want a job. So I taught English for a school in Cordova. I have a Bachelors Degree and TESL certificate. The wage was not great however better then most. I was making 7 dollars an hour and taught 30 hours a week. I hated it however the money was good. You can find jobs here you just have to be diligent. The wages are not good normally they were offering me 50 thousand pesos per month. I just did not see it worth my time. You can also apply at international schools they need teachers and depending on what your Degree is in you could get a job. I wish you the best of luck.

 

As for Lechon I would say No No and double No.

 

One last thing schools look at where your TESL TEFL certificate come from. They consider this when offering jobs so make sure you do not just go with some online certificate mill. Mine was San Diego State so I had it a lot easier. As we had to complete several hours OJT that I could add to my resume.

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seattle2cebu

I am unable to PM you, my account here wont allow it. I like the idea very much of an internet cafe

my email is [email protected]

 

I really should stay in the USA longer and put this together... crap My girlfriend is begging me to come there.

geez. I had originally planned to just visit her about this time, come back and work and then go to live there.

Well I dont want to blow the money on a visit that can be spent moving there. Now that I have truly decided

I want to go there, Im going nuts.

 

 

 

 

 

 

This is just what I would do in your situation. I would look at business that you think will generate money for you. I would then toss the ideas around and look at what is the cost risk and spread sheet all the numbers to see what is the min to just break even. Once you have done that look at the competition in the area and see how you can take away from those. Then I would look at get the expenses taken care of before you move here. Get the place running and have a 3 month nest egg just for the business. My internet cafe in Talisay started off making 400-500 a day the first 2 months it was open. Now it generates just under 2000 a day. Those are net figures.

 

Food I just do not think is the way to go. Messy and lots of work in my opinion.

 

 

Khris and I started a Laundry business in Cordova. Very successful then we sold off the assets and moved. However what we did was look at the avenues to get more and more customers. Khris then went to all the Korean schools and offered door to door service. We also had sheets and you name it. However at the time it was not being done and I had an in with the schools. The outlay for this business was 7000 dollars. We made about 45 thousand pesos a month after expenses. Just was alot of work. I guess I am lazy.

 

Then we started internet cafes. We had two and are now down to one. However we started small 10 computers running a 999 peso a month connection. We calculated with all expenses we had to run the computers 600 hours a month to reach a break even after electric rent and other misc items. So then to break it down further we need to have the 10 computers running 20 hours a day. With 10 computers that is each computer doing about 2 hours a day. Easy right. However we have niched the market for chatters and think I have one of the nicest Cafe's in the Talisay area. Currently each computer is averaging 7.23 hours per day of usage on 20 machines. We compete very well with the local market. There were 4 cafes in the area we opened now there is one. So we are doing something right. The outlay for such a business is about 3500 dollars.

 

If you need help with either of these two types PM I will try and help you. I have some very valuable lessons that were painful that I can prevent.

 

 

These are two ideas that I know generate enough money to sustain you. However you need to be prepared that the first 2 months will be horrid. Barley breaking even. So a nest egg it. Just get them started prior to coming and that way you can funnel the money in.

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USMC-Retired
I am unable to PM you, my account here wont allow it. I like the idea very much of an internet cafe

my email is [email protected]

 

I really should stay in the USA longer and put this together... crap My girlfriend is begging me to come there.

geez. I had originally planned to just visit her about this time, come back and work and then go to live there.

Well I dont want to blow the money on a visit that can be spent moving there. Now that I have truly decided

I want to go there, Im going nuts.

 

So we do not have two posts going at the same time. Here is the link:

 

http://www.livingincebuforums.com/inde...c=10173&hl=

 

In there you will find what it takes to get this off the ground for an internet cafe.

 

Remember you will have few other intial expenses about 200 dollars more with name and BIR and other things.

 

Sent you an email with a spreadsheet on how to calculate the cost risk.

 

Tim

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seattle2cebu

I got fired from my job here in Seattle, which makes about 10 fired in two weeks. The company is cutting people for any reason they can come up with. I screwed up after they gave us 15% pay cuts and got caught complaining on an internal chat with another employee, we were both fired. The job market in Seattle is the worst I have ever seen, although I have only been here 10 years. Since it would take time to find a job and etc, and staying here will just eat up the money I have, I am just going to go to Cebu now. I am leaving MARCH 9. Apparently, I can stay with my girlfriend at her aunts house. I have less money than I was going to have, because I was going to leave in April or May.

 

I was originally planning on getting a cheap apt, but Im just going to stay with my girlfriend for now. I realize staying with them could turn out to be just as expensive, but I just have to see how we handle each other. Anything I give them is more than they have now, and I think they will be ok with that. Im planning on giving them 5000 pesos a month which will cover their electric bill and water. They do not pay rent. I will buy some food and I have to pay the internet. I have to get the internet hooked up.

The main way I will save for right now is just not having to hook up everything for the first time and also paying deposit on apt and etc. It will also give me some time to scout around and see where I want to get an apt later and etc.

 

Buy the time I buy a camera here and ship an LBC box and so forth I will land in Cebu with about 1000 bucks usd

woot.. yay for me

 

 

I was looking on craigs list and there appear to be some home based customer service jobs. I will see about those.

They dont pay much. My concern is just getting something going to hang on and survive at the moment.

 

I talked it over with my girlfriend, which is hard because she dont speak much english, but I told her I can stay in

the USA for about 6 months and then come there or I can go there now with the money I have..

 

She said just come to Cebu, She said I dont care about money, I just want you here beside me.

 

so... maybe shes as nuts as I am.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

So we do not have two posts going at the same time. Here is the link:

 

http://www.livingincebuforums.com/inde...c=10173&hl=

 

In there you will find what it takes to get this off the ground for an internet cafe.

 

Remember you will have few other intial expenses about 200 dollars more with name and BIR and other things.

 

Sent you an email with a spreadsheet on how to calculate the cost risk.

 

Tim

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I talked it over with my girlfriend, which is hard because she dont speak much english, but I told her I can stay in

the USA for about 6 months and then come there or I can go there now with the money I have..

 

She said just come to Cebu, She said I dont care about money, I just want you here beside me.

 

so... maybe shes as nuts as I am.

 

I'm sorry to hear about the loss of your job.

 

I've read many of your posts, and I think you've got a good attitude. You seem to be full of 'piss and vinegar' as we used to say in the old days. That's a good thing, by the way. The world is your oyster and you can succeed in the Philippines or anywhere else if you keep a good attitude and don't give up!

 

I think you're right...your girlfriend is as nuts as you are, but I wish you the best and I think that your willingness to take an adventure like this is most refreshing and an admirable quest.

 

I'm sure others here have advised you to make sure you at least have a return ticket in case things go contrary to what is expected. That's a good idea and good advice in my opinion.

 

 

I'll be returning to Cebu on March 24th and would enjoy meeting with you and your girlfriend. I've only been to Cebu twice before, but I have learned a few little things that might help you.

 

By the way, I spent a couple years tending bar at Babe's Eastside club in Olympia, and also spent quite some time drinking in the bar in the town center of Port Townsend...though I don't remember that place's name. One memorable afternoon there I met Frank Herbert, the author of "Dune", and it was a most entertaining experience. I was living in Oly when Mt. St. Helens blew its top. The ash killed the engine in my 1969 Cougar.

 

I've survived many trials, and my guess is that your attitude will carry you through adversity as well!

 

Pete of New Hampshire

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A_Simple_Man
But you guys also fail to realize my amazing charm.

 

I have been reading through all your posts because I am simply amazed that you you can put your own shoes on . . unless the girlfriend does that for you too. . .

 

Well you charmed someone here out of a few bucks, charmed the pants off a girl who can't speak English, and manage to live under a tree eating bananas . . That's what we are calling charm these days? Guess your old boss didn't see it either because he fired you. Hmmm wonder what HE says the reason is. Guess EVERYTHING from Texas is bigger . . even the BS stories. :blink:

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QUOTE (Penguin @ Feb 17 2009, 08:42 PM)

 

Big clue: In many countries of the world, you don't need a certificate or experience to get a job teaching English. All you need to be is a native English speaker. If you are with it enough, you can learn everything you need to know from books and a little practice.

 

 

I am surprised I didn't see you at CPILS. They were assuming you would grab the offer since we, local teachers, were only given 65.00/hour before.

 

In 2007, we had a native speaker teacher from Australia who was given 300/hour. He was lucky, he was given a lot despite his lack of qualifications.

 

While the head of the Trainers' Group is a Ph. D, some of the native speakers there are teaching not because they are teachers but because they are native speakers.

 

One of them quit when one of the students in the class asked, "What is a gerund, teacher?" The teacher didn't answer. Instead, the teacher asked, "What is that?"

 

My Advice: Get a certificate as students look up to you being a native speaker and consider you a perfect source of English learning. Once you fail to answer their queries, you don't want to imagine how disappointed they are. The next day, expect to see new faces because the students will surely change your class.

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I am surprised I didn't see you at CPILS. They were assuming you would grab the offer since we, local teachers, were only given 65.00/hour before.

 

In 2007, we had a native speaker teacher from Australia who was given 300/hour. He was lucky, he was given a lot despite his lack of qualifications.

 

While the head of the Trainers' Group is a Ph. D, some of the native speakers there are teaching not because they are teachers but because they are native speakers.

 

One of them quit when one of the students in the class asked, "What is a gerund, teacher?" The teacher didn't answer. Instead, the teacher asked, "What is that?"

 

My Advice: Get a certificate as students look up to you being a native speaker and consider you a perfect source of English learning. Once you fail to answer their queries, you don't want to imagine how disappointed they are. The next day, expect to see new faces because the students will surely change your class.

 

You would have seen me at CPILS if I had taken the lousy off they made me in 2007. I looked at it closely and said why would I work in that job for that kind of pay? The pay was really beneath me.

 

I can sense jealousy in your post, maybe because the native speakers earn more than you so let me give you a heads up. They speak English better than you. You may not realize that, but it's the truth. The sooner you realize it, the happier you will be.

 

Frankly, millions and millions of people learn English without knowing what a gerund is. Because guess what? You don't need to know what a gerund is. What you do need to know is that it is the ing form. With any formal learning about the ing form, millions are able to use it effectively. My 5 year old can even use it quite well. Native speakers don't have to "learn rules" in order to know if something is right or wrong, we know it because of the way it sounds. We here it and no whether it's right or wrong.

 

One little heads up, you might want to check that last sentence you posted because it makes no sense. It's a common grammar problem that a native speaker wouldn't make.

 

About a certificate: As someone with more than 10 years of TEFL experience in a number of countries, I think my opinion is valid. A TEFL certificate is a waste of money and you are better off spending the money on a new laptop, ipod, and video camera and two or three teaching books from Amazon.

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thebob
You would have seen me at CPILS if I had taken the lousy off they made me in 2007. I looked at it closely and said why would I work in that job for that kind of pay? The pay was really beneath me.

 

I can sense jealousy in your post, maybe because the native speakers earn more than you so let me give you a heads up. They speak English better than you. You may not realize that, but it's the truth. The sooner you realize it, the happier you will be.

 

Frankly, millions and millions of people learn English without knowing what a gerund is. Because guess what? You don't need to know what a gerund is. What you do need to know is that it is the ing form. With any formal learning about the ing form, millions are able to use it effectively. My 5 year old can even use it quite well. Native speakers don't have to "learn rules" in order to know if something is right or wrong, we know it because of the way it sounds. We here it and no whether it's right or wrong.

 

One little heads up, you might want to check that last sentence you posted because it makes no sense. It's a common grammar problem that a native speaker wouldn't make.

 

About a certificate: As someone with more than 10 years of TEFL experience in a number of countries, I think my opinion is valid. A TEFL certificate is a waste of money and you are better off spending the money on a new laptop, ipod, and video camera and two or three teaching books from Amazon.

:rolleyes:

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sam12six

thebob - the couple of mistakes you're trying to highlight are pretty typical of someone who types well. It's like driving a stick, after you get good enough you don't think "put in the clutch, shift, ease off on the clutch while giving it some gas, etc.", you just think "go"

 

Same with typing; once you're good enough, you think "I know" and sometimes it comes out of your fingers as "I no" because your hands have actually gotten where they interpret your "mental voice" to the keyboard. Sometimes they screw up...

 

As for the native speaker VS certified non-native speaker, I have to agree that a native speaker would be preferable (assuming the 2 have similar teaching ability), even if that native speaker hasn't memorized the rules and definitions the way the non-native speaker has because that native speaker still follows those rules instinctively. Would you rather be taught to fish for a living by someone who grew up in a fishing village but can't tell you the scientific name of a given fish, or someone who grew up in the desert but has read a lot of books about fish?

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thebob
thebob - the couple of mistakes you're trying to highlight are pretty typical of someone who types well. It's like driving a stick, after you get good enough you don't think "put in the clutch, shift, ease off on the clutch while giving it some gas, etc.", you just think "go"

 

Same with typing; once you're good enough, you think "I know" and sometimes it comes out of your fingers as "I no" because your hands have actually gotten where they interpret your "mental voice" to the keyboard. Sometimes they screw up...

 

As for the native speaker VS certified non-native speaker, I have to agree that a native speaker would be preferable (assuming the 2 have similar teaching ability), even if that native speaker hasn't memorized the rules and definitions the way the non-native speaker has because that native speaker still follows those rules instinctively. Would you rather be taught to fish for a living by someone who grew up in a fishing village but can't tell you the scientific name of a given fish, or someone who grew up in the desert but has read a lot of books about fish?

 

I think we must have very different definitions of "types well".

 

Your assumption seems to be that a non-native speaker cannot achieve native level fluency. My experience tends to contradict that assumption.

 

I don't find your analogy to fishing at all useful. I would prefer to learn from the best teacher.

 

I do not follow your assumption that someone "who grew up in a fishing village but can't tell you the scientific name of a given fish" would be a better teacher than "someone who grew up in the desert but has read a lot of books about fish?". Growing up in a fishing village does not equate to being a good teacher of fishing.

 

In some respects, a non native teacher has an advantage over a native teacher because the non native teacher has achieved fluency in the target language and has more understanding of the problems that students face in that endeavor.

 

First language acquisition is very different to second language acquisition.

 

Apologies for being very far off topic!

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A_Simple_Man
I don't find your analogy to fishing at all useful. I would prefer to learn from the best teacher.

Well I, for one, understand the analogy. As the man said, he has " more than 10 years of TEFL experience in a number of countries"

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