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Building a home in a typhoon prone area


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oztony

 

 

Roofing may loosen or even blow off. Easy to replace. I am amazed to see how the rebar is twisted to serve as a hold down of wooden framing.

 

Why not just install the roof properly in the first place ? Not only to save replacing it but also to reduce the damage and mess inside your house ...

 

The problem with the way they perform that tie down is that the rebar is generally linked to the the rest of the rebar within the concrete posts and beams ,

Over the years , unless it is epoxy coated after it protrudes from the concrete it rusts and carries that to the rest of the steel re-enforcement like a cancer,

The same thing can be effected by dyna bolted brackets , when building no re-bar should be exposed from the concrete...especially in coastal area's.

Admittedly it would survive our lifetime , but whoever inherits it would have to deal with it.....

 

(not being picky here , just giving my take on it and I have got about 35 years of building experience)

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Concrete survives..most everything else does not...class A wood framed roofs seemed to survive better than steel framed roofs...personally I would go for a concrete roof...having said concrete survive

I think I'd consider one of those shipping container houses anchored to a cement slab.

Part of our house in Guam is made of containers. It's anchored down to cement pylons. Also secured roof with turnbuckles and wire rope. Ain't the prettiest, but no typhoon or earthquake has caused any

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richard_ost

My wife's province gets hit by several typhoons in a year. One supertyphoon hit the same year when Yolanda hit Visays. There rarely is any damage to people, mainly farm animals that die.

 

Majority of the houses are old stone houses or these days standard Philippine hollow block/concrete houses. Even the metal sheet structures seem to survive most times, not recommened solution though. If not a flat slab roof, the locals secure their old cogon roofs or modern sheet metal roofs with ropes to the ground.Older cogon roofs have a very steep angle. This sort of roof needs heavier support structures (larger surface area facing the wind directly) but prevents the wind for going "under" the roof structures (the roof doesn't become an aerofoil when the wind hits it with a steep angle). The roofs I know of that have been blown off there haven't been secured with their rope patent, and are modern (not steep) :killself: . The older people seemed to know a lot better...

 

 

There never is any serious flooding, since the terrain is elevated and there is a drainage system. The worst effect of the typhoons is the impact on cellular services, when the locals can't use FB for a while... What a shame. Mikalas list is pretty good.

 

I always thought that flooding is worse problem than the winds. You don't even need too strong typhoon, just a hell of a lot rain to drown a whole village on a flat terrain without a proper drainage system. I remember that happened at the end of 2011 in some part of Mindanao.

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Tullioz

Here are a couple of maps which may be helpful in choosing a location to build to avoid typhoons in the Philippines. 

 

post-15209-0-82937000-1483597922_thumb.jpg

http://eoimages.gsfc.nasa.gov/images/imagerecords/7000/7079/tropical_cyclone_map_lrg.gif

http://www.climatesignals.org/headlines/philippines-typhoon-history

 

 

 

 

Edited by Tullioz
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NOSOCALPINOY

 

  • Use screws to secure the roofing
  • Use hurricane (typhoon) straps / clips to secure the entire house (walls/roof) to the foundation
  • Build in a location that isn’t subject to the full force of typhoon winds
  • Build with a simple design to avoid concentration of pressure
  • Build the rood at an angle of 30-45 degrees to prevent it being lifted by the wind
  • Avoid wide roof overhangs; separate the veranda structure from the house
  • Reinforce the bracing in the structure; strengthen walls and joints/junctions to increase stiffness
  • Plant trees around the house for wind breaks, but not too close as to fall on the house and damage it
  • Use a 4-sided roof (hip roof)
  • Install tempered glass and solid wood exterior doors
  • Install shutters on windows
We had built a prefabricated home 18 yrs ago with steel frame with a hip tiled roof and withstood two Cat 4 typhoons. "Knock on Wood" for the next one in the future.
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Dafey

At the end of the day you do what you can to prevent damage and keep your family safe. You have to take a chance sometime.

 

"it's a dangerous business stepping out your front door" Bilbo Baggins

 

There are many good ideas that have been brought up in this thread and some common ones that stand out are:

 

Storm surge is the major reason for damage near the coast

Concrete has a better chance of withstanding the winds, rain and storm surge than other materials

Screws and other fasteners that are stronger at joints than nails help

Containers...virtually storm proof and can be prettier than you think

 

A question you need to look at is...how much are you willing to spend? You can build a Nipa hut cheap and jump on a plane to Oz when a storm comes. Rebuild cheap when you come back.

 

Or...spend millions in the "hope" that you're property will survive.

 

Another thing to think of is that we tend to base our speculation on the latest killer storm, Yolanda. Statistics would tell us there won't be another one like that for 200 years.

 

Me...I'm going fishing

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Well after 40 year experience of living over here I would have to say that typhoons here are kids stuff compared with Japan. So the pictures of storm paths dont really give a true impression. Thing is if they move Northerly and if they don't hit landfall storms intensify. Usually they blow East/West here. What does differ however is the usual building construction and infrastructure in the Philippines.

 

Around me has also been totally devastated a few times. We suffered house damage to the extent of replacing three roof nails where the wind had caught the roof. I cant even take pictures because its a sheltered lump of concrete fixed into the side of a mountain. I would never want to live in a flat area again. Too exposed and intensely hot and it floods.

 

If you live anywhere in Asia tropical storms and earthquakes are a fact of life and should be expected. And you should either live or build somewhere safe.

 

post-3779-0-51466300-1483603564.jpg

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oztony

You know I don't believe in sacrificing a beautiful aspect or location because Typhoons frequent the area , if you really wanted to be in that spot just build the best you can to allow for those circumstances ,

 

The main problem with most structures as I see it , is that they are not constructed to cater for those natural forces ... budget plays into that sure...

 

We had a thread on this quite awhile ago from memory , and I think some guy's were actually building in a construction method that best catered for the calamity's that typhoons can cause ,

 

Paul mentioned Dome type construction and I think that is what these guy's were up to , the wind can move over the structure instead of just smacking into it and taking parts of it with it .....

 

 

 

 

found them on the net.......

 

monolithic-dome-house-1_A7F37E767CE245F0

 

monolithic-dome-house-2.jpg

 

Dome1.png

 

129.jpg

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Headshot

The top picture looks like dome tents, but the second and third pictures look pretty nice. It really isn't necessary to use a round design, though, unless you are expecting frequent Category 5 storms. A rectangular house, properly built with a hip roof will withstand storms and earthquakes just fine. Our home had zero damage from either Typhoon Yolanda or the Bohol earthquake. Homes around us lost their roofs in the storm and suffered structural damage in the earthquake, but ours sailed right through both catastrophes.

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Paul mentioned Dome type construction and I think that is what these guy's were up to , the wind can move over the structure instead of just smacking into it and taking parts of it with it .....

 

I didn't start learning about dome construction until after I was running this forum. I had already been residing in the Philippines for a few / several years, at that time. 

 

Anyway, it seemed logical to me. You see, as a truck driver, I drove on the I-5 where the Santa Ana Winds would literally, lay big trucks on their sides. Well, they would do this to large box trucks. But, I happened to haul tanker trailers during those years. The air would just flow over and under those tanks, as smooth as silk, without causing me any problems on the interstate. I figured, once I began researching home building for an area of the world that so many Typhoons over the course of a year, I might as well consider building something that would withstand those high winds. 

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fred42

Dome structures are good but without a shady location or heavy insulation..A hot house.

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Headshot

I helped build a geodesic dome house back in 1973. To be honest, it was kind of hot inside. Then again, that was during the infancy of building those kinds of structures, and I'm sure that today's domes are a world apart from the early domes. I think it is more important HOW you build than what you build for the structure to be storm resistant. Materials and structural integrity are more important than shape.

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Dafey

 

 

To be honest, it was kind of hot inside

 

You're gonna die of something...might as well be comfortable

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oztony

Dome structures are good but without a shady location or heavy insulation..A hot house.

 

I suppose a few decent shade giving trees may take the sting out of it a bit ... 

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Dafey

the wind can move over the structure instead of just smacking into it

 

Simply explained with a round object air moves easily around it without much resistance, like Paul and his truck

 

[media]

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oztony

It would work the same with those structures even being close together , like in the first pic , the wind is able to move over and around an inbetween with the least amount of resistance...

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