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Building a home in a typhoon prone area


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Mandingo

Another thread got me thinking about things one can do to make a home more resistant to the devastating effects of a Typhoon. What are the key things someone building should do when building a home in an area prone to typhoons? 

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Concrete survives..most everything else does not...class A wood framed roofs seemed to survive better than steel framed roofs...personally I would go for a concrete roof...having said concrete survive

I think I'd consider one of those shipping container houses anchored to a cement slab.

Part of our house in Guam is made of containers. It's anchored down to cement pylons. Also secured roof with turnbuckles and wire rope. Ain't the prettiest, but no typhoon or earthquake has caused any

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If I were to construct a home in the Philippines, it would not be a conventional home. Too many Typhoons and too much of an earthquake prone part of the world to do so, for me. If it were mine, all new construction, it would be a dome home. I figure that would be the safest way to go.

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I think I'd consider one of those shipping container houses anchored to a cement slab.

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sugbu777

I think I'd consider one of those shipping container houses anchored to a cement slab.

Part of our house in Guam is made of containers. It's anchored down to cement pylons. Also secured roof with turnbuckles and wire rope. Ain't the prettiest, but no typhoon or earthquake has caused any damage. We've had the place since late 1998.

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Looking at the damage here after both Yolanda and Ruby the main thing that stands out is roofs. The metal framed ones got smashed to pieces. Also large windows. This is why you see house construction in Japan with smaller windows. Because of that and the greenhouse effect. The general rule is it should be either strong enough stand the force or the wind should be able to pass through it. Corners and edges/overhangs is where it gets ripped and peeled away.

 

Having literally been in and watched 4 or 5 devastating ones what causes a lot of the damage is flying debris objects. A lot of trees and things from other areas wreaks havoc at it flies horizontally. They still don't understand the rule here of, "If it moves, secure it or put it somewhere safe"  and to cut any trees near property.   

Edited by hyaku
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colemanlee

Concrete survives..most everything else does not...class A wood framed roofs seemed to survive better than steel framed roofs...personally I would go for a concrete roof...having said concrete survives I have to say it only survives is the block or pored concrete is up to standard...concrete block not reinforced or sub standard will not survive...

I took the following pictures the day after the storm I enclose them to let you know what stood and what did not...

 

Main street in Baybay San Jose where I live now

post-16622-0-02325900-1483575287_thumb.jpg

 

Again Concrete survives

post-16622-0-44371800-1483575334_thumb.jpg

 

post-16622-0-37059500-1483575390_thumb.jpg

 

post-16622-0-29060100-1483575430_thumb.jpgpost-16622-0-72997000-1483575471_thumb.jpg

 

This house saved my former BIL's life when he was washed down the street and made it to the balcony on the other side of the house

post-16622-0-44291600-1483575498_thumb.jpg

 

This house was right on the shore where the main wave hit...as you can see the wave cleaned out the block walls that were not reinforced with rebar...but did nothing to the poured concrete post...wave was about 35 feet at this point

post-16622-0-17230400-1483575626_thumb.jpg

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smokey

well instead of building expecting a typhoon why not just move to a place that don't get many..... We have huge window and have only broken one side of one window during the earthquake

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to_dave007

WRT to typhoons..  a house by the water might be threatened by storm surge..  while one on a hill top might be threatened by wind..  and one in a valley by landslides or a rising river.

 

WRT to earthquakes..  the effects on a house might be quite different if it's sitting on sand, landfill, rock, or a hillside..  and of course it could be built like a brick shithouse, and a landslide will still wipe all trace of it away in a heartbeat.

 

The threats are site dependant..  no one solution to all threats.   

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colemanlee

well instead of building expecting a typhoon why not just move to a place that don't get many..... We have huge window and have only broken one side of one window during the earthquake

Which is exactly what I would recommend to somebody coming here new, there are many beautiful places that do not get Typhoons..IF we did not have the businesses here, land and other thing and five kids in school we would move in a minute...but after seven years of investing here we are pretty much where we are now....

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smokey

WRT to typhoons..  a house by the water might be threatened by storm surge..  while one on a hill top might be threatened by wind..  and one in a valley by landslides or a rising river.

 

WRT to earthquakes..  the effects on a house might be quite different if it's sitting on sand, landfill, rock, or a hillside..  and of course it could be built like a brick shithouse, and a landslide will still wipe all trace of it away in a heartbeat.

 

The threats are site dependant..  no one solution to all threats.   

well then I have the perfect solution just rent problem solved

Which is exactly what I would recommend to somebody coming here new, there are many beautiful places that do not get Typhoons..IF we did not have the businesses here, land and other thing and five kids in school we would move in a minute...but after seven years of investing here we are pretty much where we are now....

 

all in all life is one huge series of speed bumps you just have to deal with them .... and there will always be someone who can only dream he could trade problems with you ..... the cup is always half full

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Mikala

  1. Use screws to secure the roofing

  2. Use hurricane (typhoon) straps / clips to secure the entire house (walls/roof) to the foundation
  3. Build in a location that isn’t subject to the full force of typhoon winds
  4. Build with a simple design to avoid concentration of pressure
  5. Build the rood at an angle of 30-45 degrees to prevent it being lifted by the wind
  6. Avoid wide roof overhangs; separate the veranda structure from the house
  7. Reinforce the bracing in the structure; strengthen walls and joints/junctions to increase stiffness
  8. Plant trees around the house for wind breaks, but not too close as to fall on the house and damage it
  9. Use a 4-sided roof (hip roof)
  10. Install tempered glass and solid wood exterior doors
  11. Install shutters on windows
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Headshot

 

  1. Use screws to secure the roofing
  2. Use hurricane (typhoon) straps / clips to secure the entire house (walls/roof) to the foundation
  3. Build in a location that isn’t subject to the full force of typhoon winds
  4. Build with a simple design to avoid concentration of pressure
  5. Build the rood at an angle of 30-45 degrees to prevent it being lifted by the wind
  6. Avoid wide roof overhangs; separate the veranda structure from the house
  7. Reinforce the bracing in the structure; strengthen walls and joints/junctions to increase stiffness
  8. Plant trees around the house for wind breaks, but not too close as to fall on the house and damage it
  9. Use a 4-sided roof (hip roof)
  10. Install tempered glass and solid wood exterior doors
  11. Install shutters on windows

 

To that, I would add...

 

12. Do not build in areas where storm surge or flooding could be a factor. Water causes the majority of damage during typhoons (hurricanes, cyclones). You can build to withstand wind, but water can destroy almost anything. Even if the structure remains, it will be gutted.

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After Yolanda, we realized we were spending a lot of time mopping water which was blowing in from the side ( long story, not worth telling). As well, we noticed a lot of debris that could have blown to the house. We are not that close to other property, but a roof of a neighbor did manage to fly up over our 2 meter plus fence. We decided a simple and effective bit of protection was to have ready to use plywood pieces to cover windows. Cheap to buy and store. Takes about an hour to install.

 

Most simple construction I've seen here, using hollow block walls with wooden roof framing survives quite well. Roofing may loosen or even blow off. Easy to replace. I am amazed to see how the rebar is twisted to serve as a hold down of wooden framing.

 

On our house, we have metal roof framing with screws to hold in place. However, the installer was not particularly skilled (we discovered too late) and did not secure the edges of the roof with screws. So, in a few places we had roofing peel back. I saw the same damage on many houses in our area (same contractor?).

 

I have purchased large pieces of tarpaulin and rope to serve as emergency cover if roofing is damaged.

 

Having a generator or two is wise as well. We had months of brownout here after Yolanda.

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RogerDat

If you build a snow load roof here, it will also stop wind load failures. In Manila, the shelter of our hotel food court area was welded steel post and beam, with a 2 foot or so spacing of rafters. They know how to build to withstand a typhoon there.

Cebu while hot and humid almost year round, has few typhoons that caused major damage. 1985 was the worst one I have ever seen pictures of.

Our house is roll form steel members welded together and bolted to the 7 inch slab every 3 feet, it is basically a solid one piece frame due to the welds.

 

post-7667-0-31899800-1483588899_thumb.jpg

 

post-7667-0-57455700-1483588946_thumb.jpg

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oztony

If I were to construct a home in the Philippines, it would not be a conventional home. Too many Typhoons and too much of an earthquake prone part of the world to do so, for me. If it were mine, all new construction, it would be a dome home. I figure that would be the safest way to go.

 

I was thinking along similar lines ... specifically if the location was on the exposed eastern side of the Phils ,

 

Although eaves are great for extra shading to a house they are a perfect grab point for the wind to start peeling your roof off ,

 

All concrete and steel construction , cyclone rated aluminium glass windows ( an American friend of mine did this even on Negros).

 

I am always amazed at how thin and pathetic the roofing materials that are used in the PI are , you cannot even walk on the standard roofing there without it denting and deforming it unless every step is on the batten line.

 

Definitely go for the highest gauge sheetmetal roofing available and screwed down at 600 centres with decent roofing screws every 2nd rib on corrugated roofing with type 17 screws.

 

At the end of the day , if you can keep your roof on ....you have the best chance of minimising the damage and your house surviving ....

Edited by oztony
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