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Just curious: Tsunami possible within the Visayas?


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BossHog

 

 

It takes a pretty big earthquake (like in excess of 8.5) to create a tsunami of any size.

 

Two computer models I've seen for the Philippine Trench show an 8.0 or 8.2 quake potentially causing a 8-9 meter tsunami waves.

 

The Manila Trench has been modeled to show a 10 meter wave from a 8.2 quake.

 

But the topic was about historical tsunamis in the Visayas; sorry for the digression.

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I'm moving next door to San Miguel factory! That way if the wave hits them first...I'll drown in a tsunami of beer !!!

Phivolcs has a good map called "Tsunami Prone Areas in the Philippines". (I'd upload it but the PDF is 35 MB).  But you can find it with Google. Heck, you can find anything with Google!        

The tsunami problem in the Tanon straight is because of the danger of underwater rockslide. There are large drop-offs like cliffs that could fall and produce tsunami like waves. I was in Tuble when th

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Two computer models I've seen for the Philippine Trench show an 8.0 or 8.2 quake potentially causing a 8-9 meter tsunami waves.

 

The Manila Trench has been modeled to show a 10 meter wave from a 8.2 quake.

 

But the topic was about historical tsunamis in the Visayas; sorry for the digression.

 

I caught my mistake before you posted, dialed it back to 8.0. And the Philippine Trench meets the other criteria too. It is a vertical slip fault.

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I used to live in Salt Lake valley, where the Wasatch fault has been trenched, and they found that it has slipped up to 100 feet vertically at a time. Think about what kind of a tsunami that would make if it was underwater. Now, think about the Philippine trench, which is capable of an even stronger quake. The depth of an oceanic trench may be an indication of the amount of stress that has built up.

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BossHog

I caught my mistake before you posted, dialed it back to 8.0.

 

 

We had a 7.6 once 

 

I immediately ran for the hills like OJ Simpson through an airport!

 

post-5791-0-88027600-1481459542_thumb.jpg

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thebob

6/2-2012 a quake of 6.7 had epicenter just 10 km from Panagsama in Tanon strait, closer to Negros. Cannot stand up, have to knee down.

 

And there was a tsunami but only 10 cm high. Half of water in my pool splashed out. All the people running Panagsama road to town (which is actually lower ground) were in panic of tsunami because they had media pictures from Japan tsunami of 2011 in their head.

 

Tanon strait not so wide so tsunami cannot evolve. I hope. We live by the sea but some 5 m up from sea level. No plans to move out  :cool:

 

The tsunami problem in the Tanon straight is because of the danger of underwater rockslide. There are large drop-offs like cliffs that could fall and produce tsunami like waves. I was in Tuble when that quake happened, it wasn't very strong.

 

We've had two evacuations in the past here on Siargao in my memory for potential tsunamis caused by major Chilean quakes.

 

To the best of my memory the lead time was about twelve hours.

 

Of course if the trench offshore goes the lead time will be a heckuva lot shorter.

 

There is a Philippine government siren and clearly marked tsunami evacuation routes in the village though. Hey, it's something!

 

I was in Siargao during the Fukushima tsunami. ironically we had to prepare for a tsunami there, while my house was being damaged in Japan. 10 days later when I was back in Japan there were some really big, long after shocks. We often get them here.

 

I was in Bagio for the quake in 1990 as well. Sometimes I feel that quakes follow me around!

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We had a 7.6 once 

 

I immediately ran for the hills like OJ Simpson through an airport!

 

attachicon.gifoj.jpg

 

That's probably a really good idea. It wouldn't be good to wait too long after a strong earthquake near Siargao before heading for high ground. It usually takes a day or so it figure out an earthquake's exact strength. You don't have that long to get out of the way of any consequences from an undersea earthquake.

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colemanlee

If it were eight to nine meters you would have a similar wave like we had during Yolanda...roughly 26/30 feet high....the bad thing about Tacloban is the bay narrows to almost nothing before it widens again which magnifies the problem..

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richard_ost
I was in Siargao during the Fukushima tsunami. ironically we had to prepare for a tsunami there, while my house was being damaged in Japan. 10 days later when I was back in Japan there were some really big, long after shocks. We often get them here.

 

I was in Baguio when the Japanese earthquake happened, I got an email from my embassy around 18:30 saying that there's evacuation order from the shores on several provinces (mainly east coast provinces if I remember right) and that the "tsunami" was expected to hit around 17-19 hours. I think it "hit" around the same time I got the message from the Embassy. Little have they learned (my government and the foreign ministry) from the 2004 boxing day tsunami that killed hundreds of thousands, even though they said they were gonna "learn" from it, because the aftermath back then was handled pathetically (by my government).

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The tsunami problem in the Tanon straight is because of the danger of underwater rockslide. There are large drop-offs like cliffs that could fall and produce tsunami like waves. I was in Tuble when that quake happened, it wasn't very strong.

 

 

I was in Siargao during the Fukushima tsunami. ironically we had to prepare for a tsunami there, while my house was being damaged in Japan. 10 days later when I was back in Japan there were some really big, long after shocks. We often get them here.

 

I was in Bagio for the quake in 1990 as well. Sometimes I feel that quakes follow me around!

 

I could say that Bohol quake 2013 was not strong; I could stand up. While ours 2012 I had to get down. Everything is relative.

 

Philvolcs did not know of this Negros fault which launched quake of 2012. Ring of Fire full of surprizes...

 

Striking how different neighbor islands Cebu and Negros; Cebu mostly limestone, no volcanoes, Negros several volcanoes, bedrock granite?

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RogerDat

That mountain that President Magsaysay's airplane hit on Cebu, Mt. Manunggal, is an inactive volcano, we uncovered a "bomb" in the limestone during house construction.

This is the only report of a tsunami in the Philippines I could find is this.

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_historical_tsunamis

On August 16, 1976 at 12:11 A.M., magnitude 7.9 earthquake hit the island of Mindanao, Philippines. The resultant tsunami devastated more than 700 km of coastline bordering Moro Gulf in the North Celebes Sea. An estimated casualties included 5,000 dead, 2,200 missing or presumed dead, more than 9,500 injured and a total of 93,500 people left homeless. It devastated the cities of Cotabato, Pagadian, and Zamboanga, and the provinces of Basilan, Lanao del Norte, Lanao del Sur, Maguindanao, Sultan Kudarat, Sulu, and Zamboanga del Sur.

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That mountain that President Magsaysay's airplane hit on Cebu, Mt. Manunggal, is an inactive volcano, we uncovered a "bomb" in the limestone during house construction.

 

Thanks, that was news for me.

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Goetz1965

If a just 2m Tsunami hits the visayasI I sure dont like to live in Mactan !

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RogerDuMond

 

 

PHIVOLCS doesn't list Cebu as a tsunami prone area:

 

Why would they? It is protected on all sides by other islands.

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That mountain that President Magsaysay's airplane hit on Cebu, Mt. Manunggal, is an inactive volcano, we uncovered a "bomb" in the limestone during house construction.

 

Sir, cannot find any proof that Mt Manunggal is volcano. Wiki lists active and inactive volcanoes but no Mt Manunggal. All sources state Cebu is volcano free island  :unknw:

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