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Your Festive Food


Scotsbloke

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Scotsbloke

you take a nice big ham.. and basically use a band saw to cut it through the bone in to steaks.. fry em up or sometimes we grill them and you get a nice big piece of ham and a little marrow as a bonus

 

not my pic just grabbed on off the web

 

 

Looks utterly delicious.

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broden

Looks utterly delicious.

a good ham steak is hard to beat

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Scotsbloke

a good ham steak is hard to beat

Before we got divorced we'd have a baked ham and a goose for Xmas to feed about a dozen.  Goose tastes brilliant...but you need to go easy on the carving as there's not much meat to the pound.

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broden

Before we got divorced we'd have a baked ham and a goose for Xmas to feed about a dozen.  Goose tastes brilliant...but you need to go easy on the carving as there's not much meat to the pound.

goose is very good and the fat from it can't be topped..

 

ham is good about any way... but i've always especially liked a boiled ham.. with cabbage, potatoes carrots maybe some small onions

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one of the largest if not the largest rabbit producers is in arkansas pel-freez and by chance when i couldn't find any in the stores i contacted them and found they were willing to sell direct to the public by the case..

 

Cost and weight?

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Headshot

Almost no shops would sell hare (jack rabbit?)

 

Yes, jackrabbits are hares, but they have very little meat on them, and what they do have is fairly tough and stringy. You also stand a pretty good chance of contracting tularemia if you handle or eat one before the world is frozen (dead of winter), so it isn't really advised. Few people would even think of hunting jackrabbits for food, though some people kill them for sport, similar to how they hunt prairie dogs (shoot them and leave them). I find that to be wasteful. Snowshoe hare, on the other hand, are only hunted in the winter, and have a lot of rich meat on their bones. They are almost twice the size and weight of a jackrabbit. They are not available in all parts of North America, but are fairly common in the northern forests and in the high mountains. Most rabbit that is eaten in the US is raised, either by individuals or by commercial operations. My cousin used to raise rabbits for sale, and I used to raise rabbits for my own use. People in the southeast part of the US do hunt cottontail rabbits, but they are pretty small. Again, they should only be hunted after the ground is frozen. I've never thought of rabbit or hare as a festive food though.

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Skywalker

In the UK I would probably have pheasant or duck, with all the trimmings.  One of my paying guests at the London house is a most excellent cook if I hide the gin.

 

Here it will be loads of chicken, and pork, and rice, and red horse (for the natives) and San Mig (for me).  I expect I'll be feeding around 20, but will cater for 25.  Mine will be the only white face.

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Richard K

I hunted rabbits all my younger years... both cotton tails and varying hares with a dog. I always like the long legged hounds because they could get through the deep snow. Black and Tan coon hound or Walker fox hounds... it was a blast and rabbits were good eating.. cotton tails better than snow-shoes but not as much meat. It was a real bonding experience with the dog. Day or night if I broke open the breech of my shotgun anywhere in the house she was up and wanting to go. I always like females to hunt with better than males... male spend too much time running around pissing on everything before they get down to business.

I raise rabbits here in the Philippines. I let them get about 10 -12 weeks old and cook 'em up. A couple a month.

Really easy to raise and cheap to feed... can't get the pinoys to eat it though... I sell a few as pets too.

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broden

 

 

can't get the pinoys to eat it though

 

if you can get them to try it.. well all i can speak for is the people i know.. my wife her mom for instance  ..all it took was one taste and they fell in love with it

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Always have herb encrusted rib roast and Yorkshire pudding for Christmas dinner.

 

If staying in for NYE, will have some sort of seafood like lobster tails or king crab legs.

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Hogan1950

We always have roast turkey with grandma's recipe bread stuffing and cranberry sauce.  Mashed potatoes, corn, carrots, and rutabaga for the veggies.  Basically an American Thanksgiving feast.  We have that at Thanksgiving as well, but since Canadian, the second week in October to Christmas is enough time to want it again.  For dessert we have Mincemeat pie and carrot pudding.  For Boxing day my sister makes French Canadian meat pie and cabbage rolls.  A funky mix of cultures there, but it works.  She also makes a couple or three different kinds of fudge (my mom's recipes), and assorted bars, tarts, and squares for people to nibble on.  Yeah, we eat way too much bad stuff during the holidays, but that is kind of what the season is for.

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broden

 

 

rutabaga

 

i love these 

 

when we have them we usually have them in 2 ways cubed and boiled with some melted butter on them

and mashed 50/50 with potato

 

speaking of that at the local lowes sometime in the last year an older british woman started working there.. very friendly .. she mentioned to me mixing mashed pumpkin 50/50 with mashed potatoes.. gonna have to try that sometime


 

 

Mincemeat

 

we make cookies with this sometimes.. just basic cookie dough like chocolate chip cookies but with mincemeat instead of chocolate chips


 

 

cabbage rolls

 

have not had these in forever.. but one of my Mom's recipes that everyone loved was similar, a bit different, but with collard greens instead of cabbage.. 

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Scotsbloke

I hunted rabbits all my younger years... both cotton tails and varying hares with a dog. I always like the long legged hounds because they could get through the deep snow. Black and Tan coon hound or Walker fox hounds... it was a blast and rabbits were good eating.. cotton tails better than snow-shoes but not as much meat. It was a real bonding experience with the dog. Day or night if I broke open the breech of my shotgun anywhere in the house she was up and wanting to go. I always like females to hunt with better than males... male spend too much time running around pissing on everything before they get down to business.

Cocker spaniel bitches are the best dogs for small game.  Small dogs but with a brilliant nose and excellent to get a bird or a rabbit 'up' plus they have a soft mouth and are very willing. I do take your point of 'dogs' over 'bitches', though.  For the sort of gentle shooting I do dogs are too eager.

 

I also take issue with 'leggy' dogs over here.  I posted this before but my ex bought a German pointer.  She's an absolute beauty but just not suited to 'small game' work.

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