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Voltage Converter Question


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You're right!  I BB boxed one over.  Also sent an old coffee maker and coffee to last a couple months with it.  Was awesome having real coffee instead of 3in1 out in the province....then Yolanda fecking took it.

 

yes, I purchased an ELC T-5000 ($109) and sent it over.

 

I can run anything form USA on it.

 

I too sent over a nice Regal Ware percolator, the newer ones are all commercial sized.

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musicman666

Just a heads up .....anything you run that has a compressor in it such as fridges etc won't survive since frequency has to be right.

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Just a heads up .....anything you run that has a compressor in it such as fridges etc won't survive since frequency has to be right.

 

huuuh

 

usa and philippines both  are 60 hz

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questsea73

In the blender and food processor arena here in Philippines the only brands I would have much confidence purchasing locally are Electrolux and Philips, both many, many times the cost of name brand products of comparable or superior quality in USA.

 

If you have a "controlled environment"(something less than chaos) at home here with only you and companion there you can control access to outlets.  In that case I would ship a jumbo balikbayan box with various needed electronic items, such as cd/radio player, 2 above items, with USA-spec transformers, ditto voltage regulators sized for tv and refrig if you own your own local purchased items for these two items.

 

But I plug the items in as a dedicated device,,,, silicone-sealing their plugs into transformer ensuring no one inadvertently electrocutes the appliance.

 

Many local items are around 350 watts if in this type category....underpowered in comparison.

 

Ken

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musicman666

huuuh

 

usa and philippines both  are 60 hz

 

Ah ok....I meant European ...the 10hz difference is a deal breaker even tho the voltage is ok.

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miles-high

Ah ok....I meant European ...the 10hz difference is a deal breaker even tho the voltage is ok.

 

Not necessarily… most 50Hz washing machines/dryers, clock (or anything using the induction motors) and microwave ovens cannot be used at 60Hz or vice versa but other appliances are OK… in any case, I have been told that most Japanese made appliances have built-in compensator (or whatever the system is called), as Japan has 50Hz region (west of Japan) and 60Hz (east)…

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thebob

Japan is also only 100V not the north American 117V or whatever it is.

 

You need to use a step-up to use some appliances in Japan.

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Have you tried to find the same blender from china or eu? if the custom tax has been dropped it should be a lot cheaper. there is always one amazon site offering good discount for whatever you seek: uk, fr, de, it and es

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Have you tried to find the same blender from china or eu? if the custom tax has been dropped it should be a lot cheaper. there is always one amazon site offering good discount for whatever you seek: uk, fr, de, it and es

careful   with thing that come from eu it is 50 hz,  so if with a motor  it may not work or just run too fast

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I would buy a blender here in philippines wired for 220/240

 

The risk that the us blender will be plugged into a 220/240 socket is very high

 

and then you will have to buy one here anyway

 

Yes agree. Philippines is a 3rd world country but already in 220-240v like most of the world.   Leave ur 110v home and upgrade to the new world.   :cool:

Sorri, just saying.

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Not necessarily… most 50Hz washing machines/dryers, clock (or anything using the induction motors) and microwave ovens cannot be used at 60Hz or vice versa but other appliances are OK… in any case, I have been told that most Japanese made appliances have built-in compensator (or whatever the system is called), as Japan has 50Hz region (west of Japan) and 60Hz (east)…

induction cooktop okay? I bought one months ago but haven't tried yet...

 

why wouldn't microwave oven work??

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thebob

induction cooktop okay? I bought one months ago but haven't tried yet...

 

why wouldn't microwave oven work??

 

Both induction hobs and microwaves rely on converting power to heat by inducing large magnetic coils or transformers. You will get huge inrush current from either of them. I wouldn't attempt to try them with a step-down transformer unless it is huge, and even then it will be horribly inefficient.

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miles-high

why wouldn't microwave oven work??

 

As TheBob says above, the magnetron and its high-voltage capacitor are, I have been told, "frequency-sensitive"... also most timers use frequency-specific oscillators...

 

Please see pages 2 and 3 --> http://educypedia.karadimov.info/library/Inverter.pdf

 

The newer inverter-type microwave ovens can be operated on either 50Hz or 60Hz, provided voltage is correct...

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Both induction hobs and microwaves rely on converting power to heat by inducing large magnetic coils or transformers. You will get huge inrush current from either of them. I wouldn't attempt to try them with a step-down transformer unless it is huge, and even then it will be horribly inefficient.

no voltage transforming, just 60hz for 50hz induction hob? so it will run a little faster?

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thebob

 

 

no voltage transforming, just 60hz for 50hz induction hob? so it will run a little faster?

 

https://www.quora.com/Would-it-be-okay-to-use-60hz-for-a-50hz-induction-cooktop

 

It should be workable PROVIDED you implement a means to limit the maximum current flow to a lower number than the nameplate rating, about 5/6th of nameplate. The effect of the higher frequency will be that the element inductance will allow higher currents so higher wattages in the heating elements at given settings than the manufacturer intended. To counteract this increase, and save the elements from overheating themselves, you likely need to reduce the voltage applied to the elements to about 5/6th of the manufacturer's voltage rating.

Or if you don't mind risking burning out elements or controls, you might try just using it as is. If the controls packages can withstand the higher currents, it all MIGHT work fine, if a bit hotter, for quite a while.

Be aware that most 50hz equipment is designed for nominal 220 volt supply, and common 60hz supplies provide 240v at the service point. That might also cause an increase in heating current above rating, exacerbating the increase due to increased frequency.

 
 

 

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