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Skywalker

Rain water is safe to drink?

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A_Simple_Man

 

 

Anyway, I don't drink rainwater.

 

I am curious what water you do drink.  If we assume it is bottled water do you have it tested to be sure the bottlers follow proper sterilization procedures for the bottle it is in?  Never have broken used caps that someone else peed on and they only washed it with soap and water (we hope) and then popped it onto your bottle and wrapped it in plastic for looks?

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Monsoon

I would have any long term drinking water system periodically tested. 

 

Do you really think you can trust the folks in those little RO shacks  to have your best interest in mind over profit?

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Headshot

The operative word being overstated.

 

There is pollution everywhere, both man made and natural.  I framed the Topic subject to invite participation.  The pollution indicated by some members was simply the results of change in temperature that produces a ground hugging morning mist, which occurs even in the Countryside, that was being misinterpreted as vehicle pollution.

Yes, to both questions.

 

So, if that haze is just "morning mist" then why are you afraid to drink rainwater? Surely it is just the product of morning mist as well.

 

Honestly, sometimes I think that some people's opinions are so full of shit they need to be run through a tertiary sewage treatment facility to find some truth in them.

 

I wouldn't drink rainwater in the Cebu Metro area either, but for different reasons. The closer you are to the source, the more particulate matter there is in the air. Every morning, we clean the diesel particles off of my vehicles ... and they are sitting in a covered garage (with the sides open. The air in the Cebu Metro area IS polluted, but the further away from the city you go, the less pollution you will find in the air. There is still some pollution even in the most remote location in the world (because the air circulates around the planet), but as with real estate, location is everything.

Edited by Headshot
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USMC-Retired

Are people really serious.  There is no way in Hell I am drinking unfiltered rain water in the Philippines.   There are so many pollutants around that are suxed up to the air then when it rains comes crashing back to earth with the rain.  I remember when I lived up in the Hills of Smokey Paradise I over looked the city and as the sun set there was this beautiful haze of yellow over the city.  Yet just following a solid rain I could see clearly now.  Oh well you enjoy your kool aide and I will enjoy mine.  

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hyaku

I have a flow of rainwater into my tropical fish pool. If the percentage is low its ok. Too much will kill them. Rain water has an acidity of PH 5.6. Its 'very' acid. What you drink form the tap should be around 7.0. That's why they put fish in water treatment tanks. Same as a canary in mines. It wont kill you but such a low acidity in no good for you. Best to filter it.

 

I also lost a lot of stock from water in an underground stream. When it rains chlorine in massive doses is pumped up from the volcano.

Edited by hyaku
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Paul

 

 

Rain water has an acidity of PH 5.6.

 

Here in Battambang, the rain is around pH 6.5 - 6.7. At the farm, it is a bit more alkaline.

Tap water is around pH 7.0 - 7.1, typically.

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Headshot

There is no way in Hell I am drinking unfiltered rain water in the Philippines.   There are so many pollutants around that are suxed up to the air then when it rains comes crashing back to earth with the rain. 

 

I would never drink unfiltered water ... period ... anywhere. Whether it comes from a stream, a lake, a well or the sky, water should be treated and filtered before you drink it. That said, sedimentation filters will do nothing for acidity or alkalinity of the water. For that, you need to treat the water with either lime or an acid, such as hydrochloric acid - HCl (known here in a dilute state as muriatic acid) or run it through a reverse osmosis filter. For chemicals, a charcoal filter will remove some. but you need to get the water tested if you have any doubts about water purity. I am now on MCWD water (my deep well died), but even with that, I run it through a series of filters before we use it for anything. We still drink bottled water (even though there were a couple of times when even that was questionable).

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Skywalker

 

 

Honestly, sometimes I think that some people's opinions are so full of shit they need to be run through a tertiary sewage treatment facility to find some truth in them.

 

I expect those people will be happy to use the sewage system you are planning to build on the Mandani Bay development site.

 

Astonishingly your opinions don't carry anymore weight, here, than anyone else's.  Though the propensity to ignore facts is a singular identifying feature of the sadly self deluded.

 

 

 

I am curious what water you do drink.

 

I don't drink water.  I am far too busy hiding in my underground tunnels avoiding zombies and meteorites.

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Headshot

Astonishingly your opinions don't carry anymore weight, here, than anyone else's.  Though the propensity to ignore facts is a singular identifying feature of the sadly self deluded.

 

You would do well to look in the mirror when you say that.

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thebob

The acid rain that was contaminating and poisoning the lakes in Scandinavia came from industrial contaminants released in the UK.  Prevailing winds and all that.

 

Quote:  ''Acid rain can be carried great distances in the atmosphere, not just between countries but also from continent to continent. The acid can also take the form of snow, mists and dry dusts. The rain sometimes falls many miles from the source of pollution but wherever it falls it can have a serious effect on soil, trees, buildings and water.

Forests all over the world are dying, fish are dying. In Scandinavia there are dead lakes, which are crystal clear and contain no living creatures or plant life.''

 

Source:  http://webprojects.oit.ncsu.edu/project/bio183de/Black/chemreview/chemreview_reading/acid_rain.html

 

A bit of acid rain won't hurt you unless you are a plant. Lemon juice is about a zillion times more acidic than any rain.

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Skywalker

 

 

A bit of acid rain won't hurt you unless you are a plant.

 

Bob, it was an example of how far contaminants can be carried in the air.  Some people are unaware of the distances involved.  Just tackling some general ignorance.  Apparently location is important - it quite clearly isn't, since airborn contaminants don't respect Country borders.

 

In fact the UK has had rainfall that contained sand from the Sahara.  http://www.metoffice.gov.uk/learning/learn-about-the-weather/weather-phenomena/sahara-dust

 

But it seems that facts are irrelevant in this thread.   :ROFLMAO:

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familyguy

It's probably safer to eat yellow snow than drink rainwater

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to_dave007

Interesting debate.. The relative safety of rainwater and treated water.

 

Back in 2000, there was a water CRISIS in the town of Walkerton Ontario Canada.  Yes.. Ontario Canada..  that rich land of thousands of lakes, with water everywhere. One of the last places on earth where one might expect a death due to water contamination.  And there wasn't just one death, there were seven, and thousands sickened when E-Coli from cow shit made it's way into the municipal water supply, and the municipal employees who were paid to keep the water clean drank beer instead.  Were it not for the efforts of the municipal heath officer the result would have been even worse.

 

refer to

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Walkerton_E._coli_outbreak

 

So.. here in the Philippines, does anyone think that we are MORE.. or LESS immune to such issues?  Do you think that municipal employees, or employees at bottling plants, might be MORE.. or LESS vigilant than in Ontario?  Do you think that regulations are MORE.. or LESS.. stringent than in Ontario?  and you think that enforcement of those regulations is MORE.. or LESS.. rigorous than in Ontario?

 

I have a Pinoy friend here in my town who runs a bottled water business.  Supposedly his staff are fully trained.. to Philippine standards.. whatever that means.  They use a reverse osmosis filtering process. and seal the bottles when they full them.   So how is it that mosquito larvae could be seen swimming in one bottle?   And what process do they use to CLEAN the bottles that get returned from customers?  and what on earth did customers put in those bottles?  You'll never know.  

 

I trust my point is clear.  Whether you drink municipal water..  or bottled water from a truck..  or bottled water from 7-11..  or water in any restaurant..  Do you REALLY know that it's clean?  Or are you relying on some human somewhere to keep it clean, and hoping he knows his stuff and doesn't pee in the water out of spite?  Whether you feel it's safe or not is all in the mind.. and the reality is a crap shoot. 

 

As for rainwater..  no doubt there are still MANY rural folk in North America who still collect water to a cistern to this day, and supply ALL household water needs from that tank.  My brother does..  and has done so for 30+ years.  I would expect to filter it (1 micron) before drinking it, but since I don't live 2 km downwind of a power plant, or nickel smelter, or nuclear fuel plant, I'm not particularly worried about dangerous chemicals. And of course there ARE chemicals in the water..  that's true everywhere now..  though I do hope out here in rural Cebu the concentrations are lower than Beijing.. or Los Angeles.  And of course the groundwater has chemicals too.. where do you think they dispose of used engine oil.. or sewage.. or pig shit..  or unused household chemicals.. here in Cebu.

 

Pretty much ALL the water we drink is rainwater in one way or another.  How else do you think it got there?

 

If I do decide to drink that rainwater, at least I will know what happened to the water after it fell from the sky?  Can you say the same?

Edited by to_dave007
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Paul

 

 

If I do decide to drink that rainwater, at least I will know what happened to the water after it fell from the sky?  Can you say the same?

 

:yahoo:  :thumbs_up:  :clapping:  :clapping:

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to_dave007

Reminds me of one of my favorite scenes from Erin Brockovitch.

 

"We had that water flown in special for your folks.  It's from Hinckley"

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BGX4nMrnxg0

Edited by to_dave007
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