Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
Skywalker

Rain water is safe to drink?

Recommended Posts

Dafey

Here on Camotes, we have been using rain water exclusivly since July this year. Showers, washing, laundry, cooking, drinking etc etc. I do settle it through 5 200 litre drums, then transfer to a 300 litre drum to settle further before pumping up to a 1500 litre tank for general use. I dose each batch with chlorine at the rate of 5ml per 100 litres, also I use ground Moringa seed to clarify and help sterilise each batch. We have had no illness or any other health problems. I dont drink it unless it has been boiled and has tea or coffee in it, but I do brush my teeth using it staight from the tank. The lad I have living here running our tricycle, and doing odd jobs around the place, drinks it all the time and says its the best water. He has not had any health problems at all. I have a 36sqmt roof area for collection, that I do keep clean, it is painted with white roof paint and is not subject to any over hanging trees etc. I clean the bottom of the tanks about every 3 to 6 months, depending on how much sediment is building up.

 

Sounds like your water is better than what we get at the bottlers! Any chance you could show us your system and explain in detail how to set it up? Possibly in a separate thread?

 

I've been wanting to set up a filtration system in the kitchen at the new house, (I miss fresh crisp veggies and salads), but afraid that won't be enough treatment.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Skywalker

Okay, disregard the science, ignore reality, forget airborn contaminants from industry.

 

Just do me one simple favour. Practice your unsafe wilderness ideas on yourself, that's all well and good. But please don't subject your children to your stupid unsafe actions.

 

Give them safe, uncontaminated, treated drinking water.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Paul

Give them safe, uncontaminated, treated drinking water.

 

I drink unfiltered rainwater at the farm, when I am there. The rainwater, while not necessarily safe in a city where industry may be, certainly is where there is nothing but air for 30 or 40 kilometers in a rural province.

 

Cambodians use the water jars (similar to the construction video I posted a couple years back) to collect rainwater. They use no filtration. In the rural provincial areas, I see them living to their late 70's and early 80s. I'm sure there are some older than that. So, the water mustn't be too bad for them, or their systems.

 

So, drinking rain water in London?

 

Any city that has a lot of industry where various chemical and other waste products may be dumped into the atmosphere, I wouldn't dare consider using water collected from rain. They don't call it "acid rain" for no reason. I don't care what sort of filtration, cleaning, or processing they have to make it cleaner prior to it going out the stacks, I wouldn't drink it. Where I live, city or province, I wouldn't have an issue drinking rainwater, though. 

 

I would suggest properly sized first flush and filtration systems, though, for any rainwater collection you may set up. I currently do not have a filtration system on our rainwater collection system at the farm. However, I will have come this upcoming year, as soon as I have some extra moola to do it with. Although not really necessary, I will have carbon filtration for taste, and additional filtration just in case any nasty's were to become waterborne.

Edited by Paul
  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Skywalker

 

 

The rainwater, while not necessarily safe in a city where industry may be, certainly is where there is nothing but air for 30 or 40 kilometers in a rural province.

 

The acid rain that was contaminating and poisoning the lakes in Scandinavia came from industrial contaminants released in the UK.  Prevailing winds and all that.

 

Quote:  ''Acid rain can be carried great distances in the atmosphere, not just between countries but also from continent to continent. The acid can also take the form of snow, mists and dry dusts. The rain sometimes falls many miles from the source of pollution but wherever it falls it can have a serious effect on soil, trees, buildings and water.

Forests all over the world are dying, fish are dying. In Scandinavia there are dead lakes, which are crystal clear and contain no living creatures or plant life.''

 

Source:  http://webprojects.oit.ncsu.edu/project/bio183de/Black/chemreview/chemreview_reading/acid_rain.html

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Paul

The acid rain that was contaminating and poisoning the lakes in Scandinavia came from industrial contaminants released in the UK.  Prevailing winds and all that.

 

Quote:  ''Acid rain can be carried great distances in the atmosphere, not just between countries but also from continent to continent. The acid can also take the form of snow, mists and dry dusts. The rain sometimes falls many miles from the source of pollution but wherever it falls it can have a serious effect on soil, trees, buildings and water.

Forests all over the world are dying, fish are dying. In Scandinavia there are dead lakes, which are crystal clear and contain no living creatures or plant life.''

 

Source:  http://webprojects.oit.ncsu.edu/project/bio183de/Black/chemreview/chemreview_reading/acid_rain.html

 

Fair enough. I will say, I was smart enough to have the rainwater tested in our area, prior to drinking it. There is a (God I hate to say this) an NGO that installs water filtration systems and tests water for you, if you take them a sample. They test for contaminants I have never heard of. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Skywalker

 

 

I was smart enough to have the rainwater tested in our area, prior to drinking it.

 

And it was probably good that day.  But, is it safe everyday?

 

Anyway, I don't drink rainwater.  

 

I remember, years ago, installing a new roof on an old ladies house in London.  Mrs Spillane was in her 80's and smoked Senior Service (strong) cigarettes every day.  She'd been smoking since she was 15.  I guess nobody told her it was likely to kill her.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Paul
Anyway, I don't drink rainwater.

 

Well, that's your choice. I guess, if anything major ever happens in the world, and the public water system where you are ends up contaminated and / or non-functioning for any reason, you will be in a world of shit. At the moment, I am pretty certain the water we consume from rainwater is pretty safe - certainly safer than what I can pull out of the ground where we live (at the farm). (I had that tested as well. Not a good result.) 

Edited by Paul

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Oz Jon

I am reminded of a long-time Oz joke.

 

 

Sometimes, tank water from roof run-off has a slightly bitter/dusty taste, causing complaints from some people.

 

The classic Oz response is that it needs another possum in the water tank! - Lol!

 

 

 

If you've ever cleaned out an Oz water tank, you will understand.

 

Cheers

  • Like 5

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Skywalker

 

 

you will be in a world of shit.

 

No so!  I drink more beer than water anyway!   :ROFLMAO:  :bar:

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Paul

 

 

If you've ever cleaned out an Oz water tank, you will understand.

 

I can completely relate. Dead birds - all sorts of things in those collection tanks. Australians still keep drinkin' it. :D

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Dafey

 

 

Anyway, I don't drink rainwater.

 

Wait a minute!!! Didn't you start this post as a question? Or did you already have the answer in mind when you did?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Skywalker

 

 

Wait a minute!!! Didn't you start this post as a question? Or did you already have the answer in mind when you did?

 

Yes.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Paul

Wait a minute!!! Didn't you start this post as a question? Or did you already have the answer in mind when you did?

 

Skywalker disagrees with some other members here, who, over time, have stated how polluted the city of Cebu seems to be. I imagine, some of those who are proponents of drinking rainwater, and who may reside in the Cebu City area, may be considered a tad hypocritical by Skywalker, having this reasoning. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Dafey

Yes.

 

Yes? Or Yes and Yes?

 

 

Skywalker disagrees with some other members here, who, over time, have stated how polluted the city of Cebu seems to be. I imagine, some of those who are proponents of drinking rainwater, and who may reside in the Cebu City area, may be considered a tad hypocritical by Skywalker, having this reasoning. 

 

Ahhhhh.....I find it hard to believe that anyone on this Forum is hypocritical...nor could they define what hypocritical means... :sarcasm: 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Skywalker

 

 

Skywalker disagrees with some other members here, who, over time, have stated how polluted the city of Cebu seems to be.

 

The operative word being overstated.

 

There is pollution everywhere, both man made and natural.  I framed the Topic subject to invite participation.  The pollution indicated by some members was simply the results of change in temperature that produces a ground hugging morning mist, which occurs even in the Countryside, that was being misinterpreted as vehicle pollution.


Yes? Or Yes and Yes?

 

 

Yes, to both questions.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.
Sign in to follow this  

  • Commercial Banner Advertisers

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use, Privacy Policy and Guidelines. We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue..