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Comparing Philippine's Education to Other Countries

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JamesMusslewhite
1 hour ago, Joe Sixpack said:

It's always interesting to hear how different expats rationalize their decisions to raise kids here.   I've got one starting 1st grade next week and I would say she's ahead of her peers in the US merely because this is her 4th year in a quality private school. 

 

We're happy with the education at this point but plan to have her in the US system by age 10...mainly to remove her from the toxic, corrupt culture here.  Yeah, she could get a good education here but there's a reason many rich filipinos send their kids abroad. 

 

I like living in the Philippines but not enough that I would ask my child to make sacrifices for me.  But everyone different...and thats my opinion.

   Before we moved here in 2008 I had already removed my child from the HISD (Houston) Public school system. This is because I feel education was more important than the Government imposed liberalize feminist gay/lesbian political-correct agenda being forced on my young son. I saw no need for my son to deal with having to walk through metal detectors and drug dog locker searches, nor subjected to the peer pressure from mindless drones influenced by the ever increasing moral decaying society; were peer-pressure encourages acting-out, being disruptive and conducting themselves in needless counter-productive antisocial behavior. What does the US school system produce today? Showflakes, where college students require safe-spaces, cry-baby pillows and coloring books merely because their candidate did not win. Where the lazy, inept and under-achiever is rewarded for participating or merely occupying a seat.

   I brought my son here in 2008 and we enrolled him in an excellent High School where he was among bright students who were genuinely focused on being educated; and were taught to respectful to their teachers and school authority. His teachers actually encouraged competitiveness from their students and openly rewarded those achievements. The school demanded that all students maintain a 'B' average throughout the four-year curriculum, and if the student's grades fell below a 'B' average they were given a warning and a makeup exam. And if the student received a 3rd warning at anytime during the year program they were dis-enrolled. 

   What his education here did lack was unruly anti-social teens, drug abuse, teen pregnancies, street gangs, high dropout levels politically correctness, emasculation of males, stiffening of competitiveness, inept teachers and administrators trying to dope their students and school systems which have decayed to the level of merely becoming taxpayer funded babysitters. And to the best of my knowledge there has never been a mass school shooting in a Philippine school by a fellow student.

   Did my decision wrong for my child?  .

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Joe Sixpack
11 minutes ago, JamesMusslewhite said:

  

   Did my decision wrong for my child?  .

Well congrats on having raised your son properly, against all odds.  Being born in Houston and raised nearby I know a thing or two about the area.  Like yourself, my parents cared enough to move us out of there at an early age.   But just to a nearby city with much better schools.  

 

As I said its interesting watching the rationalizations for raising potential first world kids in a developing nation....in your case its an unfair comparison between Philippines and an inner city US school.  Houston was a rough place for kids in the early 70"s when I was a toddler and its only gotten worse....its a shame thats all you and your son know about US schools.  Anyways, good luck to your kid and wishing him continued successes.

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Enuff

Education has very little to do with the schools, teachers or systems. Its all about what is taught at home.

Me and my 2 brothers received little to no direction from our broken home. We all graduated but all 3 barely. School was nothing more than a free lunch and a place to hang out with friends.

Unfortunately my 24 yr old son got some direction from me but he just couldn't hack it. Constantly getting in trouble and fights left him expelled by 11th grade.

In every class I recall the 3 or 4 students who tried and learned and all the others like me.

Now my wife and all her siblings were valedictorians because momma cared, maybe too much. Anything less that too grades meant kneeling in salt with arms extended hold books for hours. Maybe an extreme but shows her effort.

All of the niece's and nephews went to public school and all now have college degrees and are above average thinkers . . . . and so are their friends.

My 17 yr old niece might be the smartest of all and is starting CTU in June for her 11th & 12th grades. And I've seen evidence of how pathetic her classes were, but she and others learned dispite the surroundings.

Youngest stepdaughter is lucky andr enrolled in a private school of just 15 students, all starting 6th grade in June. Her school is different because it's free and doesn't have any dancing or holidays.

There are bright spots In every system but usually It depends on the student and parents.

Sent from my CPH1819 using Tapatalk

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JamesMusslewhite
Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, Joe Sixpack said:

Well congrats on having raised your son properly, against all odds.  Being born in Houston and raised nearby I know a thing or two about the area.  Like yourself, my parents cared enough to move us out of there at an early age.   But just to a nearby city with much better schools.  

 

As I said its interesting watching the rationalizations for raising potential first world kids in a developing nation....in your case its an unfair comparison between Philippines and an inner city US school.  Houston was a rough place for kids in the early 70"s when I was a toddler and its only gotten worse....its a shame thats all you and your son know about US schools.  Anyways, good luck to your kid and wishing him continued successes.

I was also born a raised in Houston and attended Woodrow Wilson elm., Lanier Jr. and Lamar High school (graduated  Vanguard 77) then attended UofH (business) and later twice A&M (Biology and Botony). Back in the 60s and mid 70s those HISD schools had amazing school libraries and quality dedicated educators. Lamar High was actually college prep curriculum and one of the highest rated public High schools in the county. But they are not now what they were back when I attended those schools. The funds are being absorbed by over-paid bureaucrat-administrators instead of well stocked libraries and quality textbooks. The teachers seemed unpaid, under-qualified, over-whelmed and poorly motivated. Curriculums seemed more geared to trying to develop cheat-sheets so students passed the TAS test for funding, then they were with actually establishing a curriculum which challenged the students. My son initially attended schools in Splendora and Cleveland,Tx before I moved back down to Houston.

   The total feel of the city had changed. I was primary raised in the Greater Heights/Montross areas of Houston. I still remember Nixon's forced busing from underprivileged districts but the schools were still safe and non-violent. After school you could openly inner and roam through the halls of your school as there was no need for armed guards. The schools have all totally clanged now as there are gated parking, multiple HPD armed guards, metal detectors, school uniforms to eliminate gang-colors.  After my son graduated from Piney Point Elem and was accepted into a Math/Science/ Graphics magnet program at Sharpstown J. High I would drive to Lee High School for his bus. Lee use to be an excellent school with an outstanding football program, but now it is over 80% Hispanic. They dropped their football program because they could not get enough students to field a team. It would be easier to enter Huntsville Prison than it is to enter that High School now. Lamar is still probably the best academic High Schools in Houston but they were also affected by the liberal/PC agenda. Lamar's Football team are no longer the 'Redskins' (political correctness), rather they are now the 'Texans' God forbid we hurt the sensibilities of the tribes reservationed in River Oaks.

   I remember when I drive to Lamar with a fully-loaded shotgun and 30/30 in an open gun rack, and was never once told to remove it or to not to bring them on school property. Hell there were probably another 50 gun rakes along with mine every morning, I carried either a Buck knife on my belt all through Jr. High and High School as did a lot of my fellow students, and never once was there a shooting or a stabling at those schools. Perhaps liberalism and Political Correctness makes people more violent, or perhaps when students are allowed arm themselves everyone is just nicer to each other. Looking back I realize that when I attended I was probably at the very tail end of a dying era in Houston culture, just before the liberal infection of political correctness and spineless blind appeasement crept into the culture a changed everything for the worse.

   But my son was able to experience an education more akin to what I experienced, so I do not regret bringing him here when I did as he was 13 years old at the time. He experienced the culture which raised his mother and was able to develop genuine bonds with his many cousins. I just regret that my wife did not teach him Tagalog and Visayan, as I feel that doing so may have further enriched his experience here. 

Edited by JamesMusslewhite
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