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Tango

Moving to Cebu to go to nursing school

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SkyMan
19 hours ago, Tango said:

I'm 50 now

 

19 hours ago, Tango said:

my experience is that if you put in the work it's not hard to be successful. 

Somehow I think there is a correlation in the above statements.

11 minutes ago, Davaoeno said:

Im not being sarcastic at all . I got a full scholarship with a much lower gpa . To go through university with an almost perfect score in everything is a very rare thing. The big schools look for things like that .

Used to.  Now they look at your ancestry.

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RogerDuMond

You may want to check out Velez College School of Nursing. Their admissions are based on ability of the applicant and they are not in the business for the cash. They have high number of graduates passing the boards with 98.87 percent. Last I looked (2016), they had more students taking the boards than CNU.

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SkyMan

Tango - Do be prepared to take some really off the wall classes you wouldn't be taking in the US though.  Like you'll probably be taking PE and something called NSTP which is kind of a catch all for 'whatever we want you to do today.'

You may want to see if any of the schools will give you any credit for your experience.

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Tango
1 hour ago, Davaoeno said:

Im not being sarcastic at all . I got a full scholarship with a much lower gpa . To go through university with an almost perfect score in everything is a very rare thing. The big schools look for things like that .

you don't know what you are talking about

 

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Tango
1 hour ago, SkyMan said:

Tango - Do be prepared to take some really off the wall classes you wouldn't be taking in the US though.  Like you'll probably be taking PE and something called NSTP which is kind of a catch all for 'whatever we want you to do today.'

You may want to see if any of the schools will give you any credit for your experience.

I've seen that in some of the online program descriptions. I'm hoping to get around some of these with my previous credits from America and my Degree. We'll see. I'm an animal at badminton though.

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RogerDat

"Results thru daily effort" Quinton Creech.

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samatm

 AWESOME   a 50 yro Career Change..    I like your spirit.   Go for it bro.   Welcome to the Forums. 

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Jester
On 12/12/2017 at 7:25 AM, Tango said:

Hi,

Thanks for the replies. I am an American. I have no Filipino heritage. I've been an expat most of my life. I'm 50 now and retiring from my career and want to become a nurse in the USA. Eventually, I'd like to do travel nursing and take 3 months off a year and travel.

Going to school in the USA is a pain and it's expensive and  I don't really want to live there for the time it would take me to be in school and make no money. 

I love Asia and could live like a kind at a fraction of the cost of doing this in the USA.

It's my understanding that if the school is CHED approved then the credits will convert and I can take the Nclex exam in my home state of Colorado.

I've been a medic for 15 years and have all my prerequisite science and math courses and a BS in Communications as well. My lifetime gpa is 3.97.

I'm not worried about passing the test in the USA at all. I'm a very good student and my experience is that if you put in the work it's not hard to be successful. 

Any input or experience would be greatly appreciated. 

I'm planning on coming to cebu in July to scope it all out.

Cebu Normal Univ. was the one I was looking at.

I've been looking at the process for getting a student visa and that looks fairly simple as well. Is there some kind of local "fixer" service that can help with these types of things?

Cheers!

Tango

added text

 

Let me tell you this about that.   Personal opinion I would not send my wife to the PI's for nursing school for a myriad of reasons. 

You can take a 1 year LPN cross over course in the US for cheap, then take a 2 year LPN to RV course while working. You will be done in 3 years compared to the 5 it will take you in the PI's. 

Edited by Jester
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colemanlee
On 12/13/2017 at 4:01 PM, Davaoeno said:

. I got a full scholarship with a much lower gpa

For those of us that know you, thats obvious 

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Thalcoozyo

I am U.S. citizen, intimately familiar with the U.S. nursing vs. Philippines nursing issues.  Short version of the long story:  do NOT go to the Phils for nursing school. It will hinder your career.

Despite what all you may hear, there is NO way that anything done in the Phils will qualify you for automatic US licensure. You WILL have to take the NCLEX if you want to work in the states. Some Phils college credits may transfer to the U.S. (such as chemistry or biology or math) but none of the Phils nursing education is recognized by U.S. colleges.

Typically, in the Phils, a new nurse has to work long hours at very low pay in order to get needed experience. RECENT EXPERIENCE WITH MY NIECE in the Phils has proven that overseas assignments will typically require a minimum of 2 years prior work experience. Also, the overseas recruiter will require the English equivelancy exam to be passed which is a significant test which many Filipinas fail. Sure, most college grads can pass the reading & speaking portions, but the written portion is quite difficult for most Filipinas and this is the section they fail. However, not all OFW assignments require this exam; it is based on the country. Most countries do require it, especially if the country's native is English. My niece is now in Qatar; they did not require the equivelancy exam.

Then, to add insult to injury, most OFW nurses are working at a rate of pay that would, for a westerner, be considered slave-wages. The allure of OFW nursing is the free or subsidized housing, the free or subsidized meals, the free RT flights... all of these allow them to save a fair amount of money to send back home. But the amount of money they are earning is not nearly what a typical U.S. nurse would make.

If you are U.S. citizen, wanting to be a nurse, there is absolutely no advantage whatsoever to come to the Phils for nursing school. None whatsoever. And I've been assisting my niece in her nursing education/career/OFW work for the past 9 years. I have first hand knowledge about which I speak.

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Tango
On 2/10/2018 at 9:10 PM, Thalcoozyo said:

I am U.S. citizen, intimately familiar with the U.S. nursing vs. Philippines nursing issues.  Short version of the long story:  do NOT go to the Phils for nursing school. It will hinder your career.

Despite what all you may hear, there is NO way that anything done in the Phils will qualify you for automatic US licensure. You WILL have to take the NCLEX if you want to work in the states. Some Phils college credits may transfer to the U.S. (such as chemistry or biology or math) but none of the Phils nursing education is recognized by U.S. colleges.

Typically, in the Phils, a new nurse has to work long hours at very low pay in order to get needed experience. RECENT EXPERIENCE WITH MY NIECE in the Phils has proven that overseas assignments will typically require a minimum of 2 years prior work experience. Also, the overseas recruiter will require the English equivelancy exam to be passed which is a significant test which many Filipinas fail. Sure, most college grads can pass the reading & speaking portions, but the written portion is quite difficult for most Filipinas and this is the section they fail. However, not all OFW assignments require this exam; it is based on the country. Most countries do require it, especially if the country's native is English. My niece is now in Qatar; they did not require the equivelancy exam.

Then, to add insult to injury, most OFW nurses are working at a rate of pay that would, for a westerner, be considered slave-wages. The allure of OFW nursing is the free or subsidized housing, the free or subsidized meals, the free RT flights... all of these allow them to save a fair amount of money to send back home. But the amount of money they are earning is not nearly what a typical U.S. nurse would make.

If you are U.S. citizen, wanting to be a nurse, there is absolutely no advantage whatsoever to come to the Phils for nursing school. None whatsoever. And I've been assisting my niece in her nursing education/career/OFW work for the past 9 years. I have first hand knowledge about which I speak.

Thank you for your help. After some investigation I had come to the same conclusion. In the end the best solution for me is simply to go back home and pay the ridiculous cost of a private nursing school. In the end the expense will be similar when you figure in lost earnings due to extended time frame. Thanks again for your lengthy and well thought out reply.

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Davaoeno
On 2/11/2018 at 1:38 AM, colemanlee said:

For those of us that know you, thats obvious 

hitting the hooch again today Lee ???

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colemanlee
14 minutes ago, Davaoeno said:

hitting the hooch again today Lee ???

Naw, could not pass up the dig

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soupeod
On 12/12/2017 at 4:25 AM, Tango said:

Hi,

Thanks for the replies. I am an American. I have no Filipino heritage. I've been an expat most of my life. I'm 50 now and retiring from my career and want to become a nurse in the USA. Eventually, I'd like to do travel nursing and take 3 months off a year and travel.

Going to school in the USA is a pain and it's expensive and  I don't really want to live there for the time it would take me to be in school and make no money. 

I love Asia and could live like a kind at a fraction of the cost of doing this in the USA.

It's my understanding that if the school is CHED approved then the credits will convert and I can take the Nclex exam in my home state of Colorado.

I've been a medic for 15 years and have all my prerequisite science and math courses and a BS in Communications as well. My lifetime gpa is 3.97.

I'm not worried about passing the test in the USA at all. I'm a very good student and my experience is that if you put in the work it's not hard to be successful. 

Any input or experience would be greatly appreciated. 

I'm planning on coming to cebu in July to scope it all out.

Cebu Normal Univ. was the one I was looking at.

I've been looking at the process for getting a student visa and that looks fairly simple as well. Is there some kind of local "fixer" service that can help with these types of things?

Cheers!

Tango

added text

 

Did you consider becoming a PA?  There are several programs in WA state I know of for people with your experience and it is a two year course with your credentials.

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JohnSurrey
7 hours ago, Tango said:

Thank you for your help. After some investigation I had come to the same conclusion. In the end the best solution for me is simply to go back home and pay the ridiculous cost of a private nursing school. In the end the expense will be similar when you figure in lost earnings due to extended time frame. Thanks again for your lengthy and well thought out reply.

Yup one of my wife's relatives qualified as a Nurse here (took the board exam etc) went to the US about 6 years ago - been working as a carer/low grade assistant whilst taking her exams there ... finally started working as a real Nurse in the US (for real US Nurse pay) last year!

 

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