JamesMusslewhite

New Boat Build Project - (Totally Rebuilding an Older Boat)

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Well done James! Thanks for sharing.

 

Hear hear !!

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Nicely done James..and from the looks of the money you've saved on razor blades recently you'l have a few pesos to spare for the fuel too  :)   

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James mentioned interest in a radar reflector for his new boat in his fine "New Boat Build Project - (Totally Rebuilding an Older Boat)" thread.

 

Several years ago I wrote an article for a cruising sailing magazine about radar reflectors and described how to build a DIY reflector which will outperform anything on the market, it's easy to build and costs very little (a 6'x4' x 1/8" ply sheet and some kitchen Al foil) will make 2 x 2' ones with outstanding performance, or 8 x 12" minimum sized ones).

- give a couple of 12" models to your sailing friends for Xmas?

 

I've lost the text of my article, but I still have the drawings (which I sent to James by PM)

 

If there is enough is interest, I'll start a new  "DIY Radar Reflector" thread. (or PM info if only one or 2 are interested)

 

Like the Government,  "I'm here to help you!" - Lol!

 

Oops! Sorry James, I meant this to go in the "So you want to build/buy a boat in the PH" thread.

I screwed-up!

I've copied/pasted it into the correct thread.

Edited by Oz Jon
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For the last two weeks the 'Arthur 1' has been receiving an upgrade. The old 8.5hp engine has now been replaced with an 18Hp engine.This required the installation of a heavier shaft and replacing the 2-propeller prop with a larger 3-propeller prop. New outriggers have been added as well as wooden side bench seats and a canopy. All that is needed now is for the new paint to finish curing and she will be back in the water. With a little luck she will be ready for a test spin in the next couple of days.

 

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This is a side view of the 'Arthur 1' which allows you to see the height of the wooden bench seats. I am presently getting settled in the small house my business partner built on his island for my wife and I to live while I am constructing a small prototype lobster hatchery here in Surigao. The boat will be our main transportation between our farm, lobster huts, the island and Surigao city so the upgrades will make life much easier especially when the rains kick in after the holiday seasons and our heavy rain season starts. It can rain almost straight through from late December until April. The boat is suppose to be delivered here to the little island in the next couple of days and when she is delivered I will take some more detailed photos of the new work done and will post them here in the thread for those members who might be interested.

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well the boat builder hired to do the upgrades brought the 'Arthur 1' to the little island where we are now living while I am working on this current project. I is the first time I have actually seen the boat upgrades. We took it out for a test drive and I was quite pleased with the performance of the new motor and prop, as it now has the power needed to haul the materials and product needed as well as having plenty of speed. There we just one thing I did not like which was the front standing pole which supports the peak of the new canopy. It will restrict and or hinder the loading and unloading of bulky items in and out of the boat, so I asked that it be redone and designed to exclude the front wooden pole. This will be simple enough to do and with luck it will be finished in the next few days.

 

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When they finish redoing the canopy and deliver the boat I will add some roll-up side panels to each side of the canopy using lengths of bamboo and nursery shade cloth. These panels can be easily rolled-up or let down when needed and help screen the hot sun, and the nursery shade cloth unlike vinyl or canvass will allow air to pass through it's overall surface. This allows a breeze even when let down, and this characteristic helps eliminate the wind drag, harsh popping and stresses that one encounters with vinyl and canvass. I will still have to put a vinyl panel on each side which will only be lowered in rainy weather. These vinyl panels will of course be lowered on the outside of the shade cloth panels and each will be firmly tethered to the outriggers when let down. 

 

I will be taking some more closeup photos of the boat interior, motor and canopy and will post them to the thread at a later date.

Edited by JamesMusslewhite
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Thanks for posting that video James. Love it. Really different construction method from the boat build threads I been reading recently over on "the hull truth" forum. They do pretty much fiberglass stuff there, seems like most are taking old hulls, cutting out everything including transom and stringers, recoring and glassing everything back into custom center consoles. Or there are the new builds, really fascinating to watch something like a 42' Freeman cat build from the mold up. Those south Florida guys sink incredible amounts of money into sport fishing boats of either monohull or cat design. The cats seem to be the winners as far as ride quality in the chop. Incredible they way these guys power boats like that, quad 7 Marine 627's and triple Veradoes and all that. Check this video out, guy has got quad Suzuki 300's and records the hole shot.....whooo hoooo!

 

I'm interested because I am restoring a 1973 Starcraft Mariner 14 aluminum side console boat. The hull is stripped now. I am learning to buck solid aluminum rivets and laminating plywood and fiberglass for a new transom board. I will re-deck it, replace the cable and pulley steering with a Teleflex NFB sytem, rewire everything. I have a 1971 Johnson 50hp 20" shaft two stroke with 155 psi compression on both cylinders that runs, Will rebuild the lower unit. A little bit of overpower for this boat, she should scoot pretty good when I get it propped right.

 

I noticed you are using Pioneer Marine epoxy for your build, is that two part, what is your pot life when mixed and how easy is it to get? When I finally make it to the Philippines I would be very interested in boat building as a hobby.

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On 07/06/2017 at 8:16 PM, davedude said:

Thanks for posting that video James. Love it. Really different construction method from the boat build threads I been reading recently over on "the hull truth" forum. They do pretty much fiberglass stuff there, seems like most are taking old hulls, cutting out everything including transom and stringers, recoring and glassing everything back into custom center consoles. Or there are the new builds, really fascinating to watch something like a 42' Freeman cat build from the mold up. Those south Florida guys sink incredible amounts of money into sport fishing boats of either monohull or cat design. The cats seem to be the winners as far as ride quality in the chop. Incredible they way these guys power boats like that, quad 7 Marine 627's and triple Veradoes and all that. Check this video out, guy has got quad Suzuki 300's and records the hole shot.....whooo hoooo!

 

I'm interested because I am restoring a 1973 Starcraft Mariner 14 aluminum side console boat. The hull is stripped now. I am learning to buck solid aluminum rivets and laminating plywood and fiberglass for a new transom board. I will re-deck it, replace the cable and pulley steering with a Teleflex NFB sytem, rewire everything. I have a 1971 Johnson 50hp 20" shaft two stroke with 155 psi compression on both cylinders that runs, Will rebuild the lower unit. A little bit of overpower for this boat, she should scoot pretty good when I get it propped right.

 

I noticed you are using Pioneer Marine epoxy for your build, is that two part, what is your pot life when mixed and how easy is it to get? When I finally make it to the Philippines I would be very interested in boat building as a hobby.

   The marine epoxies were multi-purpose 2-part which of course you have to mix and needs to be applied rather quickly. This was used at all joints and outside surfaces of the hull frame to add an additional bond for the marine plywood skin. I used a lot of clear epoxy which is a two-part sold in a 1 gallon can with a smaller can of hardener. This I applied quite thickly on all of the inner surfaces once the plywood outer skin was finished. In some areas as many as 5 thick coats were painted and usually took a couple of hours to sufficiently harden before we pained the next payer.  

   After the clear coats had sufficiently dried and cured we flipped the boat and painted 3 thick layers of clear coat to all the surfaces of the hull and keel. After these layers had dried we pained all the inside surfaces with 2 layers of white pigmented epoxy primmer, and then 3 layers of white pigmented epoxy base paint. Then the boat was flipped and 3 layers of yellow pigmented epoxy primer, 2 layers of orange pigmented epoxy base; and then two layers of blue pigmented epoxy base was painted to the hull and keel at the waterline, and 3 layers of blue pigmented epoxy base to the accents and top deck. When all the painted surfaces had sufficiently dried and cured we added 2 additional layers of clear epoxy top coat to all interior and exterior surfaces of the boat. Some may think that seems like over-kill but the boat was built for heavy service often in shallow water with heavy rocks and corals. We have hauled numerous heavy loads of supplies which were being loaded and offloaded; such as hollow blocks, bags of stone and sand, plants, trees, as well as lengths of bamboo and heavy lumber. I still spent less than $400 for all the epoxy and epoxy primers, paints and topcoats; and I feel it has been money well spent.

   Now let me add this: The last layer of blue pigment epoxy we painted on the top deck, we added washed coarse mason sand into the paint and mixed it well, and then pained the top decking both forward and aft.. When that top layer was pained it had the consistency similar to drywall-spackling, and even with the 3 layers of epoxy clear coat being applied over this blue spackled layer, it allowed for a non-slip top deck even when wet you stay sure footed. I strongly suggest to anyone building a boat to do the same as saltwater spray, rain or heavy humidity/condensation can normally make the top deck as slippery as ice. It certainly helps avoiding unnecessary slipping which can case embarrassments, injuries or falling into or out of your own boat. Just a little advice.

   You will find that multi-function and marine rated epoxy and epoxy based painting products are readily available here in most big towns and cities here, as the Philippines is a boat culture. You will also find quality saltwater resistant hardwoods and quality marine plywood and sufficient assortment brass nails and stainless steel bolts, nuts and screws. I have probably have 80-90 thousand pesos invested in this 34 footer (not including motor), which is the price for a decent motorcycle here  With regular maintenance the 'Arthur 1' will give me dependable service for decades to come. I am quite pleased with how the project came out as it is a good looking boat but has proven to be a real workhorse. My next boat build will be two or three years away but I am designing a wide-body 45-50 footer which will be needed for business, so the 'Arthur 2' is now on my drawing board. It will still be small enough to easily fit into the shallows but sea worthy enough to scoot around these islands.

   It has always been a wish-list item of mine to build a comfortable 65 foot cabin cruiser based on the hull design of a WW2 US Navy PT boat. That design has more than proven to be perfect for these waters around the Philippines even during rough water conditions. The living quarters would be like a 40 foot mobile home that floats; now that I could really enjoy in my retirement years.           

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Thanks for posting that James. Very good information. Best of luck to you in your endeavors.

PT boats are a bit of a buzz all the time but recently another one was restored and put back in the water I think. Fascinating the construction details and history of those. I was at the WW2 museum in New Orleans last year but missed this display somehow....Hull Truth thread on the PT boat with some good photos:

http://www.thehulltruth.com/boating-forum/827096-ww2-pt-boat-roars-life.html

 

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