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New Law - Foreigners Can't Be Buried in Philippines


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#61 Majorsco

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Posted 04 January 2014 - 10:00 PM

maybe they remember that 1 million filipinos were killed by the Americans 1899-1902 [ estimates range from hundreds of thousands to 1.5 million ]


Estimates over about 60-100k are dubious. I have not seen evidence of large numbers, but lots if anecdotal stories. Remember this is a so called war that was only a war from the Filipino side. From the American side it was just a post territorial transfer from Spain with an insurgency. The Muslim problem in the south was a sticking point that Gen Pershing had to deal with that had one or more reputed massacres.

Even in1898 large death counts got reported, but in the Philippines no such substantiated reports existed.



#62 Brucewayne

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Posted 05 January 2014 - 6:11 AM

Technically, you can be a dual citizen here. It just needs to get voted on by congress and only like 50 people a year or something get it. I can't remember the exact details, been awhile, the guy who owns bigfoot on mactan got citizenship here.

 

http://en.wikipedia....chael_Gleissner

 

The head guy at BI told me a few years ago that if I were to abandon my U.S. citizenship to become a Philippine citizen, I could apply to the U.S. for dual citizenship after I had acquired Philippine citizenship.

The Philippines at that time didn't allow us to become outright dual citizens, but couldn't stop us from doing so after gaining Philippine citizenship.

Very expensive and convoluted process if one were to ask me.



#63 Majorsco

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Posted 05 January 2014 - 7:43 AM

The head guy at BI told me a few years ago that if I were to abandon my U.S. citizenship to become a Philippine citizen, I could apply to the U.S. for dual citizenship after I had acquired Philippine citizenship.
The Philippines at that time didn't allow us to become outright dual citizens, but couldn't stop us from doing so after gaining Philippine citizenship.
Very expensive and convoluted process if one were to ask me.


There is no US citizenship reacquisition process like there is for Philippines. If you lose US citizenship you have to go through naturalization process which requires renouncing of foreign citizenship to be sworn in as American.

#64 Brucewayne

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Posted 05 January 2014 - 7:56 AM

There is no US citizenship reacquisition process like there is for Philippines. If you lose US citizenship you have to go through naturalization process which requires renouncing of foreign citizenship to be sworn in as American.

 

 

See what I mean?



#65 dHb

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Posted 05 January 2014 - 1:40 PM

Was discussing this with my wife - we bought 2 burial lots in a private memorial park back in 2008 and my father-in-law is interred there. As long as the lot has been legally bought by the family (Filipino national of course), anyone (such the foreign husband/children) can be buried there.

 

She thinks this "law" is more for the public cemeteries...



#66 Headshot

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Posted 05 January 2014 - 1:54 PM

There is no US citizenship reacquisition process like there is for Philippines. If you lose US citizenship you have to go through naturalization process which requires renouncing of foreign citizenship to be sworn in as American.

 

While this is true, gaining citizenship in another country no longer automatically nullifies your US citizenship. It used to, but not anymore. Now, you have to apply to the US State Department (and pay a fairly large fee) to renounce your US citizenship. Simply becoming a citizen of another country does not do that. The US decided a few years ago that there is more money in keeping you as a citizen than there is in revoking your citizenship.


If you don't know da rules, please read them.

If you do know da rules, please follow them.


#67 SkyMan

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Posted 05 January 2014 - 3:22 PM

That duty was implemented  on April 1, 2003   .  Its 13%

Ouch!! I thought we didn't have to give tips.

Is that true that the USA and its allies are paying for cemetary rentals after giving there lives for this country?? Does France do the samething? Not meaning to hijack

We pay millions to france every year to maintain cemeteries for our troops that died there to liberate them.

#68 SkyMan

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Posted 05 January 2014 - 3:28 PM

...you have to go through naturalization process which requires renouncing of foreign citizenship to be sworn in as American

No longer true. Renouncement of foreign citz is no longer required or assumed.

#69 Majorsco

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Posted 05 January 2014 - 3:52 PM

No longer true. Renouncement of foreign citz is no longer required or assumed.


My wife got US citizenship only 4 years ago and yes she had to give up her Philippine citizenship.

What law changed it? Is there a citation? I have not heard of any law passing to change it.

#70 Majorsco

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Posted 05 January 2014 - 4:18 PM

From the USCIS website today:http://www.uscis.gov...-states-america

 

Naturalization Oath of Allegiance to the United States of America

Oath

"I hereby declare, on oath, that I absolutely and entirely renounce and abjure all allegiance and fidelity to any foreign prince, potentate, state, or sovereignty, of whom or which I have heretofore been a subject or citizen; that I will support and defend the Constitution and laws of the United States of America against all enemies, foreign and domestic; that I will bear true faith and allegiance to the same; that I will bear arms on behalf of the United States when required by the law; that I will perform noncombatant service in the Armed Forces of the United States when required by the law; that I will perform work of national importance under civilian direction when required by the law; and that I take this obligation freely, without any mental reservation or purpose of evasion; so help me God."

 

The principles embodied in the Oath are codified in Section 337(a) in the Immigration and Nationality Act (INA), which provides that all applicants shall take an Oath that incorporates the substance of the following:

  1. Support the Constitution;
  2. Renounce and abjure absolutely and entirely all allegiance and fidelity to any foreign prince, potentate, state, or sovereignty of whom or which the applicant was before a subject or citizen;
  3. Support and defend the Constitution and laws of the United States against all enemies, foreign and domestic;
  4. Bear true faith and allegiance to the same; and
  5. A. Bear arms on behalf of the United States when required by the law; or
    B. Perform noncombatant service in the Armed Forces of the United States when required by the law; or
    C. Perform work of national importance under civilian direction when required by the law.

The language of the current Oath is found in the Code of Federal Regulations Section 337.1 and is closely based upon the statutory elements in Section 337(a) of the INA.






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